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December 03, 1982 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-12-03

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A

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ARTS

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The Michigan Daily
Pennell' s

Friday, December 3, 1982

Page 8

I

,. ,

Ri & SAT otA 12:OO/oII sQt ea q3'
The Most Fun
You'l Ever Have O
BEING SCARED .
B, D

By Coleen Egan
"S4 RARE A wond'red father and a
wise man Makes this place
Paradise," asserts Ferdinand about
Prospero, the wizard in Shakespeare's
The Tempest. So rare a wond'red
production is the University Players'
performance of The Tempest, with
renewed classical actor Nicholas Pen-
nell as Prospero and directed by Dr.
Richard Burgwin. The opening night
performance of Shakespeare's last play
was wonderful in almost every way.
The play tells the often tragic, often
comic, tale of Prospero, the exiled
Duke of Milan, and his struggle to bring
order back into his world. Pennell's
portrayal of the god-like character was
as artful and magical as the character
he played. His beautiful, deep, full,
voice and his ingenious, sensitive ac-
ting were two of many highlights in the
production.
Pennell, well known for his perfor-
mance with the Skakespeare Festival

7 kMGM/UA
RICHARD PRYOR
LIVE ON
SUNSET STRIP
MOVIES AT
BRIAR WOOD
799.9751 " 462 SNIARWOOD CIRCLE

in Stratford, Ontario, skillfully lead the
audience through the tragic story of a
man who neglected his dukedom in or-
der to pursue his fascination with
supernatural power. He then charmed
the audience through Prospero's
growth from a vengeful, vain wizard to
a forgiving, wise human being. The
many facets of the talented and ex-
perienced Pennell convincingly
brought forth the serene, com-
passionate, metamorphosis of
Prospero.
The juxtoposition of Ariel, Prospero's
airy spirit (played by Gregg Henry)
and Caliban, Prospero's savage slave
(played by William Freimuth) was
another highlight of the play. Both
Henry and Freimuth played their par-
ts marvelously. Henry, costumed in a
sky blue and white leotard, - represen-
ting the fluid elements of water and air,
triumphed in a very demanding part.
His physical limberness and grace,
coupled with a pleasant speaking and
singing voice, satisfyingly enhanced
the supernatural element in the play.
Freimuth's Caliban, contrasted in ac-
tions as well as costumes, wearing ear-
th green and brown, was commendable
also.
Walter Bilderback and A. H. Alpern
were also notable in their performances
of Triunculo the jester, and Stephano
the butler, respectively. The two
provided delightful comic relief from
the main action of the story. H. D.
Cameron as the garrulous, old coun-
selor, Gonzalo; David Robinson as An-
tonio the brother of the Duke of Milan;
and Mary Trapp as Prospero's
daughter Miranda, all warmed up to

najestic
their parts as the play progressed and
were able to outact their mates.
The music and set design for this
production of The Tempest, both spec-
tacular, expressed perfectly the
mystical and etheral quality of the
play. The scene design by Debbie
Fishman consisted of a curved, spiral-
like platform with pillars. It projected
an appropriate feeling of motion for the
tempest Prospero creates in the first
scene. The pillars served as lookouts
for the suggested ship in this scene and
for Ariel's perches in the rest of the
play. The revolving center of the spiral
and pillars aided in establishing a
change from one side of Prospero's
Mediterranean island to another.
The music, combinations of har-
psichord, recorder, cello, percussion,
and choir was distinctively and ex-
pressedly beautiful, and augmented
characterizations, atmosphere, mood,
and actions in the play. It did need to be
a bit more dramatic as did the lighting
to make the tempest in the first scene
more believable.
The highly effective wedding masque
acted out by the mythological charac-
ters Iris Ceres and June was also
lacking. In this scene the poetic charm
that should have been there was
missing. Overall though, the spectacle
in the show was quite attractive and fit-
ting to Prospero's tale.
To all of those involved in The Tem-
pest, the first of the Theatre depar-
tment's power series, "Honor, riches,
marriage blessing, Long continuous,
and ever increasing, Hourly joys be still
upon you" for a job well done.

Prospero

A

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Nicholas Pennell stars as Prospero in Shakespeare's 'The Tempest.'

Curi~ng thehazards ol

By Sarah Bassett
V INCENT VAN GOGH might have
been one victim. The blurry stars
and haloed lights in Van Gogh's later
paintings may have been due to more
than artistic license: The painter may
have suffered from swelling of the optic
nerve, a side effect of the lead poisoning
he might have acquired from lead-
based paints.
Goya may have been another victim.
While many historians think
schizophrenia or syphilis was respon-
sible for the artist's illness in his middle
age, the fact remains that Goya used a
lead-based white pigment in his pain-
tings. He, too, may have had lead
poisoning.
Since the danger of poisoning from
art materials was not well understood
when Van Gogh and Goya lived, their
diseases were possibly diagnosed and
treated incorrectly. But today, a
growing number of researchers are
studying the very real health hazards
associated with the fine arts. They
speculate that the physical suffering
these two historical figures experien-
ced was, ironically, a result of their
greatest joy-their art.
The researchers also contend that
contemporary artists face similar
hazards, if not from lead compounds in
paint then from other, less well-known
toxic materials. The general consensus
is that artists who are regularly ex-

posed to chemical aubstances should be
cautious, and should take steps to
protect themselves from potentially
dangerous ones.
While many artists are aware of the
risks, some have an incomplete under-
standing and others remain relatively
unenlightened. In an effort to reach
people associated with the arts in the
Ann Arbor area, a group of graduate
students from the University's School
of Public Health has banded together to
present a one-day conference on
December 4: "Health Hazards in the
Arts and Crafts-A Workshop."
Jointly sponsored by two School of
Health departments-Health Behavior
and Health Education, and Environ-
mental and Industrial Health-plus the
School of Art, the conference is to con-
sist of lectures and workshops presen-
ted by artists, faculty and industrial
hygienists. Two nationally recognized
authors on health hazards in the arts
will speak: Dr. Lawrence Whitehead.
and Gail Barazani, author of two books
on the subject.
The conference will explore three
areas of control: ventilation,
housekeeping and storage methods,
and protective equipment and clothing.
The coordinators hope to attract
professional artists, art instructors and
students, industrial hygienists and con-
sultants in the field.
Kristine Thompson, one of the
program planners, said the major pur-
pose is to provide practical ideas and
suggestions for taking reasonable
precautions in arts-related work.
"Artists face some unique
problems," she said. "Most of the
research relating to health hazards has
been done in industrial settings, so it's
been difficult to translate the findings
into specific recommendations for
people in the arts. Many are simply not
aware of the hazards they face, while
others have knowledge but take very
few precautions."
Recently, the eight students perfor-
med a needs assessment study, sur-

veying representatives of local art
associations, as well as independent ar-
tists. The students figure they sampled
only a fraction of the artistic com-
munity but, even then, found that
protective measures artists can take
vary widely.
Most artists take at least basic
precautions, Thompson said, such as
the printmaker who habitually avoids
direct contact with chemical rinses.
Problems begin to arise when an artist
must choose between safety and the of-
ten gratifying experience of being
immersed" in the materials of his or
her medium.
"We ran across some people who felt
that the materials they use are such an
integral part of their art that they can't
separate them out at all," Thompson
said. "Certainly, that's their choice.
But our goal is to inform them of op-
tions they have available, perhaps ones
they've never considered."
Some may not realize, for instance,
that good ventilation can be a critical
health factor. One artist actually went
so far as to change to a different
medium after discovering' that her
work imposed health hazards not only
on herself, but on others in the same
house.
Drastic moves like that are not often
necessary, but precautions usually do
require some kind of trade-off. For one
artist, it might simply mean wearing
eye goggles, or bothersome plastic
goves. For another, it might mean
taking extra time to store chemicals
roperly or to clean work surfaces
thoroughly. And, in some cases,
adequate ventilation might be an ex-
pensive undertaking.
It depends on the individual and what
he or she is willing to do for safety's
sake, Thompson said, adding that
health risks are still not well-defined in
many areas. Processes involving the
use of neon or lasers may be hazardous,
for example. New synthetic resin com-
pounds might pose a risk through skin
absorption or accidental ingestion.

t6
E'art
The }problem g, such materials are
too new for anyne to know with cer-
tainty, and no Owe knows the actual
number of people working regularly
with these substanes. "It's hard to get
facts and figures Ot how many people'0
face problems," Thompson said,
"because only estimited statistics have
been computed. It's difficult to track
down artists who don't belong to
professional organitions. We can't
tell how serious the prbem really is."
Enough research bias been done,
however, to identify ertain diseases.
Silicosis is a lung disase more com-
monly called "potter's ot" or "potter's
asthma." Silica-the Qst of minerals
and metal compound-is a natural
component of certain clys and glazes,
which means pottery iakers should
take care with ventilatio.
Artists are beginning t push for bet-
ter product labelin as well.
Sometimes no ingredient are listed on
containers, and usually th hazards are
not spelled out, nor ar emergency
procedures specified. If these were
madeavailable, Thompsorsaid, people
could then make a rationakhoice when
buying materials.
But what happens whe the most
hazardous cleaning solvens the best
one? Or the truest colors en only be
gotten with a potentially dangerous
pigment? Many artists wold opt for
the substance that best enhaces their
work: artistic merit might tae priority
over safety.
Those are precisely the ilemmas
and questions the upcoming ciference
intends to address. "We war. to help
people recognize the risks mot fully,':
said Thompson, "and we'll pint out
community resources they cn use,
such as industrial hygienists od con-
sultants. We're here to help artts find
feasible methods to reducE their
risks-methods that involve reasnable
compromise."
The conference will take place aturr
day, December 4, from 9:00 a.m. 1:30
p.m., in the north campus art all ar-
chitecture building. Tickets are
available at the door or through avan-
ce registration. For more informaion,
contact: Dr. Scott Simonds at 763938,
or Dorothy Talbot at 663-2220.

UAC Soph Show '82

UAC Soph Show '82
presents
Bye,
Bye,
Birdie!

AN A $2 $2.00

SAT AND SUN
SHOWS BEFORE 6 PM

$2.00

INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Awe of Liberty 761-9700

- Richard Freedman
U Newhouse Newspapers

"'DON'S PARTY' IS VERY FUNNY INDEED!
BRUCE BEOESFORD MAY BE THE BEST THING THAT'S HAPPENED TO MOVIES
SINCE WILLIAM WYLER, DAVID LEAN AND FRED ZINNEMANN."
- Lewis Archibald, Aquarian
"BAWDY, FASCINATING, COMPELLING STUFF!"
Rex Reed, N.Y. Daily News
- ~OO
PARTV
An Outrageous Comedy
Directed by
BRUCE BERESFORD ("Breaker Morant")

0l

d*

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