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September 10, 1982 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-10

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 10, 1982-Page 11
House override gives
Reagan first major defeat

From AP and UPI
Yesterday's house vote killing
President Reagan's veto marked the
first major economic defeat for the
president in Congress.
The vote sent the bill to the Senate,
where GOP Leader Howard H. Baker of
Tennessee said a vote would be held
today. He said the outcome there was
"uncertain."
The House vote was 22 more than the
two-thirds majority needed to override
a presidential veto. A similar two-
thirds Senate vote is needed to enact the
bill into law over the president's objec-
tions.
The fight basically was a struggle
between spending money on guns or
butter. Reagan wanted more money for
defense and less for education, tran-
sportation and jobs programs.
But in attempting to woo House
members to sustain Reagan's veto,
House GOP leader Robert Michel said
"it is my understanding the president
can live with the lowered defense spen-
ding" in a new supplemental funding
bill that also cuts more from social
programs.
It was only the second time in nearly
two years the House has voted to over-
turn one of Reagan's vetoes, and the
first such action on a major spending
bill. The vote came as the president was
flying from Topeka, Kan., to Utah on
the first trip of his fall political offen-

sive.
Just moments before the tally, House
Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill, (D-Mass.)
appealed to Republicans who originally
supported the bill to "stay with your
conscience. "
"Let's get America moving again.
And let's not leave these elderly, the
handicapped and the disadvantaged
behind," said O'Neill, who took the
unusual step of casting a vote. As
speaker, O'Neill normally votes only in
the event of a tie
In all, the measure was about $1.9
billion below the amount originally
requested by the president, even though
he rejected it as too costly.
But by administration figures, it con-
tained $918 million more in domestic
spending than the president wanted for
programs such as community service
jobs for senior citizens, mass transit,
highways, student financial assistance
and aid to education. It also cut $2.1
billion from Reagan's defense request,
although Congress indicated it would
approve that money next year.
The bill provides funding for several
federal agencies and programs through
Sept. 30, the end of fiscal 1982. Without
enactment of a supplemental bill, most ,
federal agencies and programs will
begin running out of money next Wed-
nesday.
Unpaid furloughs of federal em-
ployees, including the military, have
been avoided so far through cash-

shuffling schemes that also will expire
next week. Thousands of government
workers could face layoffs then unless
legislation is agreed to in the mean-
time.
Amid the predictions of a close vote,
the House Appropriations Committee
was already at work on a backup bill.
Some measure is needed by next week
for the government to meet its military
and civilian payrolls.
Since the bill was actually under
Reagan's overall request, House
Republican Leader Robert H. Michel
(R-Ill.) said the president lost support
because lawmakers did not believe it
was a budget-buster.

-

-NIABO

I

- ' INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5thAwe o lberty 761-9700

AP Photo
HOUSE SPEAKER Thomas O'Neill (D-Mass.) and House Majority Leader Jim Wright (D-Tex.), far right, celebrate
the House vote yesterday which overrode President Reagan's veto of a $14.2 billion spending bill. Standing with them
are Rep. Thomas Foley (D-Wash.), far left, and Rep. James Whitten (D-Miss.).

14

House overrides Reagan

's

veto

of supplemental financial aid bill

"Irresistible'
"Nothing less than the be
comedy about being
young since Truffaut's
'Small Change'."
VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. TIMES

(Continued from Page 1)
"It's too close to call," said Harvey
Grotrian, head of the University's
financial aid office. He said the
Republican majority in the Senate may
prove to be a significant obstacle for the
bill.
IF THE Senate fails to override the
veto, Congress then would be forced to
draft a compromise version of the bill.
Congress would have the option of
altering parts of the bill or eliminating
them altogether.
"I see a bloody battle," Butts said.
"There are a number of scenarios that
might be played out," he added, while
declining to speculate on the
)ossibilities.
The supplemental aid bill, which
would provide additional funds to the
SEOG Program, was sponsored by

Rep. Carl Pursell (R-Plymouth), who
spoke yesterday on the House floor in
favor of the override.
"HE (PURSELL) believes the chan-
ces of a Senate override are better in
light of the House's action," said a
spokesman for Pursell.
The spokesman said if the Senate
sustains the president's veto, Pursell
would continue to fight for "essential"
parts of the bill.
The University originally expected
its 1982-83 allocations to drop more than
$260,000 from the SEOG Program, a 25
percent reduction. In the BEOG (Pell
Grant) Program, the University was
scheduled to lose $600,000, a 12 percent
cut.
STUDENTS IN lower-income
brackets probably would benefit the
most from the additional UIniversity

SEOG and BEOG funds; according to
both Grotrian and Butts.
While other universities across the
country have reported a backlog in
processing applications due to late
federal decisions concerning aid
allocations, Grotrian said this has not
been the case at the University.
"We finished notifying continuing
students (of their aid) during the week
of Aug. 16 and are continuing to process
Guaranteed Student Loan ap-
plications," he said.
"We have, over the years, been ac-
curate in our projection of federal fun-
ds," Grotrian added. "'The changing
nature of the federal programs did slow
us down somewhat but it never halted
us in the processing of student ap-
plications."

I
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*Schmidt ignores calls to resign

"IT WILL LEAVE
YOU FEELING TEN
FEET TALL"
-REX REED

BONN, West Germany (AP)- Chancellor Helmut
Schmidt ignored calls for his resignation yesterday
and dared'his jeering opponents to try to vote him out
ofofice:
After hours of verbal jousting in the Bundestag, or,
Parliament, it appeared nothing had been settled to
quiet the constant criticism that has racked Sch-
midt's weakened coalition government for months.
IN HIS annual state-of-the-nation address, Schmidt
told opposition- leaders they should call a "no-
confidence" vote and elect a new chancellor if they
are so determined to get him out of office before
general elections in 1984.
"Let's vote on it next week. I have no fear of a no-

confidence vote," Schmidt said. "I am not thinking of
resigning," he added.
But opposition Christian Democrat leader Helmut
Kohl refused to pick up the gauntlet, saying he
preferred to await the outcome of two state elections
scheduled Sept. 26 and Oct. 10.
INSTEAD, KOHL demanded Schmidt's
resignation, saying the "lingering illness of the
government threatens to take over our entire coun-
try."
Genscher's small, liberal Free Democrat Party
and the Social Democrats have been governing West
Germany in tandem for 13 years.

20' white bond copies (8% x II loose sheets/no min.)
celebrating the grand opening
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kinko's copies 1
540 EAST LIBERTY
CORNER OF MAYNARD & LIBERTY
(Above Burger King)
a(313) 761-4539
SALE ENDS SEPTEMBER 30, 1982
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK!

(R)

Business as usual at University Cellar

(Continued from Page 1)
renovations aren't done yet, so I don't
know what we'd be doing right now if
we'd stayed there," he said.
Anticipating greater sales because of
the U-Cellar's move, Follett's officials
said they bought more textbooks than
usual this year.
"We're selling a lot of books that
we've never sold before, in quantities
that we've never sold before," said Lyle
Leuk, the store's manager. Follett's
purchased up to 40 percent more books
in certain subjects, he said.
"IF NOTHING else, there is more
traffic going past our store, Leuk said.
I think a lot of students will stop by
here because it is closer and more con-
venient (than the U-Cellar)."
Follett's is located at 322 S. State St.,
near the Nickels Arcade. "Even if
they're true blue U-Cellar customers,
it's hard for them to walk past here to
the Cellar," Leuk said.

Officials of Ulrich's Bookstore,
another U-Cellar competitor, said that
although they ordered more textbooks
than last year, the U-Cellar move had
nothing to do with the increase. More
books were ordered this year because
of an inventory shortage last year, ac-
cording to Tom Musser, Ulrich's
manager.
Musser said it's too early to tell
whether Ulrich's is doing more
bookrush business this year than last,
but that "this is a good bookrush."
Several students shopping at Ulrich's
yesterday said they chose the store
because of its convenient location. "The'
Cellar would be more inconvenient
because I'd have had to carry my books
back across campus," said sophomore
Walt Bauer.
Although U-Cellar shoppers
acknowledged the inconvenience, they
said the trip was worth it, for one

reason or another. "It's a little incon-
venient," said junior Andy Teklinski. "I
did part of my shopping at Ulrich's, but
now that I've seen the (U-Cellar) place,
I'll do all of my shopping here."
To offset the inconvenience of the new
location, according to Assistant
Manager John Sappington, the U-Cellar
has offered several incentives to
students who shop there. In addition to
the discount on textbooks offered by
other stores, the U-Cellar has offered a
shuttle service all week. The shuttle,
which stops at the Hill dormitories, the
corner of South University and East
University streets, and the Michigan
Union, runs between 10 a.m. and 3:30
p.m.
The management also is raffling off a
prize of complete reimbursement for
course books this term, and a prize of
the 6-foot stuffed bear on display in the
store, Sappington said.

RICHARD GERE
DEBRA WINGER
DAN OFFICER
ANDA
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BOOK BAG SALE
LEVIS-$15.99
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