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November 30, 1982 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

America's gifted youth
frown on sex, dope

NEW YORK (AP) - Most of Amer-
ica's highest-achieving high school
students say they have never had sex or
smoked pot, and they give President
;Reagan higher marks than he gets from
other Americans, according to a survey
released yesterday.
The 13th Annual Survey of High
'Achievers, published by "Who's Who
Among High School Students," showed
that the nation's most capable students
'tend to be conservative on many issues
&and are usually from happy, stable
homes-in keeping with past surveys.
"HAPPINESS at home is the main
thing," said Denise Parent, 17, a senior
at Columbus High School in Marshfield,
Wis. She plans a career in neurop-
sychology and is one of 23,000 students
who took part in the survey.
The survey found that 75 percent said
they have never had sex, but 50 percent
approve of premarital sex. Only 4 per-
cent said they used marijuana, com-
pared with 10 percent in the 1981 sur-
vey, and 21 percent in 1970. And 39 per-

cent favor legalized abortion, down
from 42 percent a year ago, and 70 per-
cent in 1970.
Reagan is apparently regarded far
more favorably by high-achieving
youngsters than by the general public.
Nearly 55 percent of the youngsters
surveyed say Reagan is doing a good or
excellent job with the economy, com-
pared with 33 percent in the November
Associated Press-NBC News poll of
American adults.
AND ON foreign policy, Reagan gets
a good or excellent rating from 56 per-
cent of the students surveyed - com-
pared with 36 percent in the AP-NBC
poll.
The group surveyed was selected
from among 363,000 students attending
public and private schools across the
country who were nominated by prin-
cipals or guidance counselors to be
listed in "Who's Who Among High
School Students." Students are not
charged a fee for being listed, nor do
they have to buy the book.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 30, 1982-Page 3
"LAW SCHOOL
CONVERSATIONS"
With
UM Law School Admissions Dean
Allan Stillwagon
Small group discussions on preparation for law school, law
school expectations, how admissions decisions are made, and
how to select a law school.
Time: 9 to 12 and 1:30 to 3:30
(Hourly Discussions)
Place: 312 Hutchins Hall
(Law School Admissions Office)
Please sign up for time and date.
Dates: November 16, Tuesday
December 1, Wednesday
January 11, Tuesday
JOSTEN' S
White Lustrium Rings

-APPENINGS-
Highlight
The Citizens' Advisory Committee on Rape Prevention will present the
second in its seres-of educational/outreach meetings on sexual assault at
7:30 at the Ann Arbor Public Library.The programwill be broadcast live
on Public Access TV channel 10. Fbr more information contact Lowell
Peterson at 663-9069.
Films
Cinema Guild-Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid. 7 & 9:05 p.m., Lorch
Hall.
Classic Film Theatre-Pretty Baby, 5:30 & 9:30 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Classic Film Theatre-Murmur of the Heart, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Speakers
The Center of Chinese Studies -R. Bin Wong, "Significance of the Fbod
Riots in Qing China and Western Europe," 12 p.m., Lane Hall Commons
Room-
Flumenical Campus Center -Prof. Lemuael Johnson, "Racism in the U.S.
and Britain (An African Perspective)", 12 p.m., 603 E Madison Street.
Rudolph Steiner Institute of the Great Lakes Area-Prof. Elnst Katz,
"Man in the Spiritual World After Death," 8-10 p.m., 1923 Geddes.
Hillel and Law School Student Senate -Nathan Dershowitz, "Congress
and the First Amendment: A JewishPoint of View," 8 p.m., Hillel, 1429 Hill
St.
Dept. of Chemistry -Stephen [nchchetti, "Chemical Substructure Sear-
ching Via Cas-Olnline," 4 p.m., 1210 Chem. Bldg.
Organization of Arab Students-"Middle East in Turmoil: What Can We
Do About It?", Presentation by ADC, 7 p.m., Marley Hall, North Pitt.
Chinese Studies-Prof. Wang, "Tenant Agriculture & Tenant-Landlord
Struggle During the Ming andQuing Periods," 3-5 p.m., W. Conf. Rm,
Rackham.
Bioengineering-J. L. Hudson, "Cytometry: Instrumentation &
Tchniques," 4-5 p.m., 1042 E Ehg.
E1onomics -Hans Ehrbar, "The Political Elonomy of World Peace IX: The
International Monetary System," 7 p.m., 1429 Mason.
Biomedical Research Council & Warner Lambert Co. -Donald Reis, "Cen-
tral Autonomic Control in the Circulation," 4 p.m., Aud.
Human Growth & Development-Peter Smouse, "Genetic Implications of
Age-Dependent Penetrance in Manic-Depressive Illness: Sex & The Single
light," 12 p.m., 300 N. Ingalls Dining Rm. 2.
Ellucation-Garry Walz, "Adult Life & Career Development," 4 p.m.,
1211 SFB.
Meetings
University Lesbian Network, meeting 6:30 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
Tau Beta Pi-Final Bectee meeting, 7:30 p.m., 140 BSAD.
Ann Arbor Support Group for the Frm Labor Organizing Committee -
Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,308 E William.
Baptist Student Union -Meeting, 7 p.m., 2435 Mason.
Ann Arbor Go Club -Meeting, 7-11 pm., 1433 Mason Hall.
His House Christian Fllowship - Fellowship & Bible Study, 7:30 p.m.,
925 E Ann St.
Society of Christian Ehgineers -Brown Bag Meeting, 12 p.m., 315 W.
Rhg.
Bicycle Club -Mtg., 8 p.m., 1084 E Ehg.
Aikido Club -Mtg., 5 p.m., Sports Bldg., 606 Hoover St.
Racquetball Club -Practice Meeting, 7-9 p.m., CCRB, Cts. 10 & 11.
Miscellaneous
Impact Jazz Company -Impact Dance Workshop, A. Parish and H. Hsu,
7-8:30 p.m., Pendleton Room.
American Society Fbr Public Administration, Huron Valley Chapter -
Dinner Program, "Revitalizing Michigan's Ebonomy: What the Dcperts
Propose," 5:30-9 p.m., Holiday Inn Elst-Flaming Pit Banquet Center.
Uof M Wildlife Society -Wildlife Art Sale, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., first floor of
School of Natural Resources.
New Age Universal life Church -Full moon meditation service, 8 p.m.,
FHiends Meeting House, 1420 Hill Street.
CEW -Informal Drop-in Job Hunt Club -12-1:30 p.m., Cntr.library.
School of Music - Student Brass Quintet, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly
Hall.
School of Music-Percussion Esemble, 8 p.m., Rackham.
School of Music-Haechung, Piano Recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
HOUSING DIVISION
FOR WINTER TERM 1983
POSITION OPENING: RESIDENT ADVISOR-
Michigan House, West Quadrangle (Male Corridor)
Interested individuals who have an updated application on file
may call the Housing Office (763-3161) and request that their
application be forwarded to West Quad. New applicants may
pick up an application; job description, etc., in the Housing

Office, 1500 S.A.B. from 8:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon and from 12:30
n~m.4:3 n~m. Tesda. Nvemer 3 thoughTuedo I

Probing the mind APPhoto
Observers look at an image of the human head, made without X-rays at a
radiologists' convention in Chicago. The process, called nuclear magnetic
resonance, uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field to make an analysis
of tissue without surgery.

Special Price!
$89.00

MSU faculty
(Continued from Page 1)
a run-off; that no one (of the three
choices) would get more than 50 per-
cent of the vote the first time."
Both McGuire and Korth said they
were surprised with the outcome of the
vote. "We were unhappily surprised
because we felt that from our surveys
that we would do much better," Korth
said.
PROF. JOHN Henderson, spokesman
for the Committee of, Concerned
Faculty - a group opposed to collective
bargaining - said he was surprised by
the wide margin of defeat. "I thought
we would win, but I didn't think it would
be as sizeable."
"I believe that the majority of the
faculty conceive of themselves as
professionals in their respective fields
of researchers and teachers and not as
employees," Henderson said.
"I think the majority also believe that
the last thing needed at a university is
more bureaucracy," he added.
MCGUIRE suggested that if the elec-
tion had been held a year ago, the out-
come might have been different.
Because of the year delay, the univer-
sity's 1981 financial crisis was not fresh
in the minds of faculty members. Since
that time, he added, administrators
have kept a low profile.
Another problem, McGuire said, is
that since May, 1981, when the elections
were first authorized, a number of
collective bargaining supporters left
the MSU faculty.
Finally, he said, the two groups were
at a disadvantage because they did not
have the support of faculty from
schools which have been exempt from
serious budget cuts-such as the
colleges of agriculture, business, and
engineering.
Both McGuire and Korth agreed the
role of the faculty in the decision-
making process is of greater concern to
MSU professors than salary increases.
"ESSENTIALLY, the basic issue is

rej ects union
what is the role of the faculty in the
university," McGuire said. "The salary
decision is one facet of a larger
problem."
Although the faculty does have some
input, its voice is not always heard, he
said. "What happens is the faculty
committee makes a recommendation
that the university can then do with it
what it wants," he explained. "We can
talk all we want but that talk is ineffec-
tive."
Although law prohibits another vote
from taking place for one year, Korth
said he is optimistic. "We've just got to
keep on trying."
F AST ST EREO SE RVICE
TV RENTALS
USED EQUIPMENT
HI F1 STUDIO
215 S. ASHLEY
DOWNTOWN i BLOCK WEST OF MAIN
',BLOCK NORTH OF LIBERTY
769-0392 or 468-7492

s#p
t*
1.

_- -
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See your Josten's Representative

\\cij ii cdav,1
Main IIor e: l

Decemnber 1
11 :00 azv-

- Friday,
4:00 pin

MOR T N AIBOKSTR

Dcecmber 3
I~c i lo ic hi rom

1 [

THE WOL VERINES
ARE GOING To THE RS OL R OU?
SALUTE, TO THE ROSES
A Special Celebration For The Wolverines in Los Angeles
ONE NIGHT ONLY! THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1982 7:00 p.m.-MIDNIGHT
"Salute to the Roses," the Rose Bowl event you won't want to miss, will take place
at Southern California's most exciting attraction, SIX FLAGS MAGIC MOUNTAIN,
AIAGOhome of COLOSSUS, the ultimate roller thrill! FREE FALL, THE REVOLUTION,
MOUNTAIN ROARING RAPIDS plus 260 acres of more FUN, THRILLS & SHOWS! TOP NAME
1ust2sminutesnorth STARS! MARCHING BAND! CHEERLEADERS! DRILL TEAM! DIXIELAND BAND!
ofuniversalStudios CELEBRITY AUTOGRAPH BOOTH! MUCH, MUCH MORE! UNLIMITED USE OF ALL
ofUnvesa Sudos RIDES, SHOWS AND ATTRACTIONS!!

The Night
Before
New Year's
Eve!

PERFORMING IN PERSON!
Showcase Theater Big Band Show & Dance
PETER MARSHALL GORDON MAC RAE
& CHAPTER 5 HELEN FORREST
Green Willow Theater THE INK SPOTS
Country Western Show ALVINO REY & ORCHESTRA
starring Contempo Pavilion
JOHNNY TILLOTSON TOP 40s ROCK SHOW & DANCE

Send For
Tickets
Today!

Tickets Must be Purchased in Advance. Use Discount Coupon Below.
Tickets will be available at hotel tour desks at regular price $24 adults, $12 child under 12.
Tickets with transportation included also available at hotels in Los Angeles & Disneyland area.
PRESENTED BY THE LEUKEMIA SOCIETY OF AMERICA AND INSIDE HOLLYWOOD TOURS, INC.
S SPECIAL WOL VERINES DISCOUNT COUPON--CL P & SA VE $2.00 PER ADUL T TICKET
SA LUTE TO T HE ROSE S
1 --

moMENTEST PREPARATIO
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
Visit Any Center
And See For Yourself

)N

I

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