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November 21, 1982 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-21

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4

Page 6-Sunday, November 21, 1982-The Michigan Daily
TVLISTINGS

(Continued from Page 5)
holiday approaches, members of the widely
dispersed Walton clan try to organize a fami-
ly reunion.
8 ®~ MOVIE ***1/ "The China Syn-
drome" (1979) Jack Lemmon, Jane Fonda.
After his warnings that an atomic power
plant is headed for a meltdown go unheed-
ed, a nuclear engineer takes over the control
room.
®O f 6 eQ S THE MAGIC OF
DANCE
* JIM BAKKER
Q 0 DBEST OF MIDNIGHT'SPECIAL
530 S( )NEWHART
IDMOVIE * "Virus" (1982) Glenn Ford,
Chuck Connors. A deadly virus is stolen from
a military lab and unleashed on the popula-
tion, spreading a trail of death and destruc-
tion.
'1000 ()CAGNEY & LACEY
HBO18 MOVIE ***1/2 "Prince Of The
City" (1981) Treat Williams, Jerry Orbach.
A New York cop is caught between federal
pressure and loyalty to his fellow officers
during an investigation of widespread police
corruption. 'R'
® THE GOLDEN AGE OF TELEVISION
"The Comedian" Mickey Rooney stars as an
egotistical comic who thrives as a, star by
devouring everyone around him.
SED FAITH FOR MIRACLES
©Q (ED 90 Q NEWS
w S i la MOVIE ***/2 "Nothing
Sacred" (1937) Fredric March, Carole
Lombard. A terminally ill girl receives two
weeks of pleasure as part of a publicity
stunt.
IQ ® THE NATIONAL I JOURNAL
(140 ©S4SIX GREAT IDEAS
10MOVIE ** "How To Succeed With
Sex" (1970) Zack Taylor, Mary Jane Car-
penter. A young man uses the instructions
contained in a sex manual to seduce his
unwilling girlfriend. 'R'
® MOVIE **1/2 "Wanda" (1970) Barbara
Loden, Michael Higgins. After a painful
divorce and a series of loveless affairs, a
woman finds herself attracted to a bumbling
crook. PG'
1:06QDNEWS
1'1004381) 1) NEWS
STO BE ANNOUNCED
The University of Michigan Gilt
(7

0 0SANFORD ANDSON
© 0 DSOAP
Q ® SPORTSCENTER
Q ® DICK CAVETT
E 0CMACNEIL / LEHRER REPORT
11:05 Q (D WOMAN WATCH
) 6 NEWS
11:30 (2) ()MADAME'S PLACE
o () THE BEST OF CARSON
® D! 8 0 ( S ® Q PBS
LATENIGHT
® ADVENTURES OF THE FALCON
0 0 ® BENNY HILL
0 0 CHARLIE'S ANGELS
m MOVIE ** "Your Ticket Is No Longer
Valid" Richard Harris, Jeanne Moreau. A
love affair develops between a fading tycoon
and a beautiful woman.
m MOVIE *** "Ghost Story" (1981)
Fred Astaire, John Houseman. Mysterious
deaths begin to decimate the ranks of a
small circle of elderly men who share both a
monthly storytelling get-together and a 50-
year-old secret. 'R'
11:350 0 (NEWS
O ® DETROIT FIGHTS BACK Peter Arnett
examines the plight of the American auto
industry and what factories in Detroit are
tryno to do to improve the situation.
WEI MARY TYLER MOORE
12:006 Q IRONSIDE
®DNEWS
80 00THREE STOOGES
O m BIG 10 FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS
OS®TO BE ANNOUNCED
6 ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY Celebrate the
world premiere of a new violin concerto by
composer David Amram featuring soloist
Charles Castelman.
12:05 0 ! ABC NEWS NIGHTLINE
12:15 A MOVIE "Keep Rolling" (1940) Gene
Autry, Smiley Burnette.
12:300 ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT
0D UNTAMED WORLD
0 ED0MOVIE **** "Goodbye Again"
(1961) Ingrid Bergman, Yves Montand.
Neglected by her lover, a Parisian lady
accepts the attentions of another man.
12:350 () THE LAST WORD
O mE MOVIE * 1/2 "Goodbye, Charlie"
(1964) Tony Curtis, Debbie Reynolds. Shot
by an irate husband, a playboy is reincarnat-
ed as a girl.
bert and Sullivan Society presents
i/i1P.rn

1:00 6 Q SATURDAY NIGHT
0 ® LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID LETTER-
MAN
il HBO MOVIE **12 "So Fine" (1981)
Ryan O'Neal, Jack Warden. A stuffy college
professor saves his father's floundering gar-
ment factory by inventing a new type of
ladies' jeans. 'R'
0 GREAT PERFORMANCES
0y MOVIE * * V2 "They Met In Bom-
bay' (1941) Clark Gable, Rosalind Russell.
A pair of jewel thieves is forced into fighting
the Japanese instead of searching for a trea-
sure.
1:15 I®MOVIE ** "Lady For A Night" (1942)
Joan Blondell, John Wayne. A woman from
a gambing boat marries a man for his
wealth and a much-coveted position in soci-
ety.
1:30 Q ®INSIDE BASEBALL (R)
E MOVIE * * "How To Succeed With
Sex" (1970) Zack Taylor, Mary Jane Car-
penter. A young man uses the instructions
contained in a sex manual to seduce his
unwilling girlfriend. 'R'
Q MOVIE * * "Convoy" (1978) Kris Kris-
tofferson, Ali MacGraw. Truckers and cops
attempt to outwit one another in a rough-
and-tumble war on wheels. 'PG'
1:35 d MOVIE **** "The French Con-
nection" (1971) Gene Hackman, Fernando
Rey. Two tough narcotics investigators foil a
huge heroin deal.
2:00 ©Q CBS NEWS NIGHTWATCH
O ® ROMANCE THEATRE
ED THE MAGIC OF DANCE
10 i®FUTURE SPORT A scientific explora-
tion of athletic performance which can aid
athletes in improving their game. (R)
® MOVIE **'/2 "Wanda" (1970) Barbara
Loden, Michael Higgins. After a painful
divorce and a series of loveless affairs, a
woman finds herself attracted to a bumbling
crook. 'PG'
2:30 0 ® MOVIE ** '/ "I Love My Wife"
(1970) Elliott Gould, Bt'enda Vaccaro. A
young surgeon turns to extramarital affairs
when he becomes bored with his job and
family.
y-SPORTSCENTER
2:35 DHBO MOVIE ** "Loophole" (1981)
Albert Finney, Martin Sheen. A criminal
mastermind and a respectable architect plan
to execute an elaborate bank robbery from
the sewers below the streets of London.
2:500(EDl0NEWS
2:55 0 MOVIE ** "Sweethearts On Parade"
(1952) Ray Middleton, Lucille Norman. The
teacher at a music school sees her ex-hus-
band return to town as head of a carnival
show.
3:00 ®BUDDY HOLLY: REMINISCING Twenty
years after Holly's death, this program
examines the legend of this remarkable '50s
artist and explores the changes which have
occurred in the lives of the members of his
band, his widow, his family and the musical
world.
©D m NEWS
F3MOVIE * * "Your Ticket Is No Longer
Valid" Richard Harris, Jeanne Moreau. A
love affair develops between a fading tycoon
and a beautiful woman.
3:05 O m MOVIE * * 12 "The Green Glove"
(1952) Glenn Ford, Geraldine Brooks. A
World War I veteran gets involved in murder
when he returns to France in search of a
jeweled glove hidden during the war years.
330 a mE TOM COTTLE: UP CLOSE
O3® COLLEGE FOOTBALL Notre Dame
Fighting Irish at Air Force Falcons (R)
m MOVIE ** "Good Riddance" Charlotte
Laurier, Maurie Tifo. A precocious 13-year-
old's obsessive love for her mother provokes
a destructive sibling rivalry.
4:00 EmPBS LATENIGHT
©DEDBARRY FARBER
® ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY Celebrate the
world premiere of a new violin concerto by
composer David Amram featuring soloist
Charles Castelman.
4:20(0D HBO MOVIE ** 1/2 "Any Which Way
You Can" (1980) Clint Eastwood, Sondra
Locke. Before settling down with his girl and
petorangutan, a bare-fisted fighter signs up
for one last, lucrative match. 'PG'
4:30 0 G®NEWS
4:40® MOVIE **/2 "Slightly Honorable"
(1939) Pat O'Brien, Broderick Crawford.
An attorney attempts to uncover high-soci
ety crime and crooked policemen.

Federal tax breaks aid wealthy

(Continued from Page 1)
income exceeding $50,000 a year make
up only 4.4 percent of all taxpayers, but
pay nearly 33 percent of all taxes even
after taking advantage of various tax
credits.
Reuss said the study was the "most
current and thorough" analysis of
revenue losses resulting from 33
separate exclusions, exemptions,
deductions and other tax credits
provided for under existing tax law.

It shows, he said, that the "most
progressive" tax breaks under current
law include the earned income credit,
exclusion of disability pay, exclusion of
untaxed unemployment benefits and
tax credit for the elderly.
The Treasury analysis indicated that
only 2.2 percent of the benefits from the
tax credit for the elderly go to those
with incomes exceeding $50,000 and
that high income taxpayers get no
benefits from the other three.
The biggest loss, about $24.4 billion,

comes from the exclusion of pension
contributions and earnings from
taxation. Only 26 percent of the benefits
from such tax savings go to high-
income taxpayers.
The second biggest loss in tax
revenues, $19.6 billion, comes from the
deductibility of mortgage interest oOi
owner-occupied homes. The more af-
fluent taxpayers get 30 percent of the
benefits from that tax break, according
to the study.

world terrorism: Harder to combat

4

or The King of Barataria
December 8, 9, 10, 11 Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Ann Arbor, Michigan
s-SU dent
$4.0Ot,

(Continued from Page 2)
eight months of 1982.
Targets include diplomats, security
forces, synagogues, banks, politicians
and unfortunate passersby. Public
places. often bristle with preventive
weaponry. Some embassies are for-
tified, on sealed-off streets. Bomb
squads haul away suspiciously parked
cars.
IN EXTREME response, generals in
El Salvador and Guatemala allow
mysterious agents to kill or torture
suspected left-wing terrorists-or sym-
pathizers-by the thousands, Western
intelligence sources say.
Democracies seek to safeguard in-
stitutions despite the terrorist threat.
Suspects must not only be identified but
also convicted and, if arrested in
another country, extradited.
As a result, known terrorists can of-
ten slip across unchecked borders and
go free, protected by incompatible laws
and political differences.
CIA REPORTS identify more than
100 groups that used terror for political
goals since 1968, from romantics who
bomb empty buildings for lost causes to
technology-equipped commandos who
kill en masse.
Some are agents of governments,
such as Syria, who work behing
diplomatic immunity, intelligence
sources say.
Many share safe houses, arms,
money, training and techniques. "We
have no evidence of any unified com-
mand, but when terrorists come to a
town, they know where to go," says a
top Interpol officer in Paris.
UNTIL RECENT waves of violence,
France and Belgium were considered
terrorist havens, and police admitted
privately to an unwritten truce with ac-
tivists who left their jurisdictions alone.
After the Goldenberg's assault,
French President Francois Mitterrand
vowed to "tear out terrorism at its
roots." He added a "public safety"
department to his Cabinet, reinforced
the police and ordered strict border
controls.
But France shelters 150,000
registered refugees, and uncounted ac-
tivists, including wanted Italians, Latin
American guerrillas and Middle
Eastern dissidents. Despite orders,
road borders remain casually watched.
' IMPORTANT sectors in France op-
pose new police computers as a threat
to civil rights. Many argue controls on
foreigners violate a tradition of
political asylum.
Jealousies among French police for-
SHORT OR LONG
Hairstyles for
Men and Women
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Liberty off State........668-9329
East U. at South U........ 662-0354
Arborland .............. 9975
Maple Village ...........761-2733

see what they do.'

-U.S. Terrorism expert

ces, the paramilitary Gendarmerie and
intelligence services have erupted in
public acrimony, and officers accuse
one another of hiding information.
U.S. and European officials complain'
they are often frustrated, or confused,
when seeking French help.
"THEY sometimes just let people go
to avoid political hassles," one U.S. of-
ficial says, upset at a recent refusal to
return Vicker Tcharkhutian, an Ar-
menian wanted for a Los Angeles bom-.
bing.
France, in 1978, freed Abu Daoud,
suspected mastermind of the Munich
Olympics massacre, refusing ex-
tratition to West Germany of Israel.
Italian prosecutors accuse France of
having harbored Red Brigade kingpins.
"Maybe they will help now that they
need us," an Italian official says. "But
we'll have to see."
BUT THE Socialist government last
year granted amnesty to Jean-Marc
Rouillan, leader of the anarchist group
Direct Action, who had been captured
in a shoot-out.
Justice Minister Robert Badinter
argues terrorism must not distort
legality. Interior Minister Gaston Def-
ferre insists terrorists must fear
punishment. When police arrested two
Rouillan lieutenants recently, and
linked ,them to Palestinian groups, a
conservative cartoonist had Defferre
telling Badinter: "Please don't free
them before the weekend. I have to
paint my house."
Belgian police set up an anti-
terrorist unit and decided to com-
puterize records. But Belgium remains
a favorite black market arsenal. "It's
no secret that 3,000 pistols a year disap-
pear from the national arms factory,
and that's only part of it," a Belgian of-
ficer remarks.'
IN WASHINGTON, a Justice Depar-
tment specialist observes:
"Sure, police cooperate. But some
terrorist groups can't be infiltrated,
and if they are, no one wants to en-
danger his own agent to help someone
else. There is so much political turf to
protect, even within individual coun-
tries, that I don't think we'll ever see
really effective cooperation."
He says the FBI controls terrorism
by pursuing every case to the end. "We
spent $4 million and two years to find
the guys who shot a Cuban diplomat,"
he says.
AFTER MUNICH, authorities
mounted such strike forces as west
Germany's GSG-9 and Italy's
"Leatherheads." They agreed on anti-
terrorist conventions and shared what
they learned.
"We were caught off guard at first

with no anti-terrorist apparatus," says
Arturo Chiodi of the Italian Interior
Ministry. "It was like building a For-
mula One racing car while hurtling
down the track."
West Germany's Bundeskriminalamt,
the BKA, uses computers that can rout
out safe houses by analyzing electricity
and telephone use patterns. Last year,
35,000 Germans called police with
leads, prodded by large rewards and a
sense of social discipline.
ITALIAN police plea bargain, using
information from repentant terrorists
to catch those still at large.
Terrorists also adapted. A secret
British Army report on the Irish
Republican Army typified assessments
of other groups:
"The mature terrorists, including the
leading bombmakers, are usually suf-
ficiently cunning to avoid arrest. They
are continually learning from mistakes
and developing their expertise."
MOST NOW avoid confrontation,
leaving victims rather than taking
hostages in a method the IRA calls
shoot and scoot.' They flee across
borders, leaving confusing clues that
create international legends and ob-
scure tracks.
"For a while, it was Carlos (Ilich
Ramirez Sanchez), and police saw him
behind every tree," says a Belgian
specialist. "Now it is Abu Nidal."
A Polish-made WZ-63 machine pistol
is the presumed signature of Abu
Nidal-Hassan Sabri al-Banna-a
Palestinian dissident condemned to
death by the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
HIS COMMANDOS are linked to anti-
Semitic and anti-PLO attacks across
Europe, including the June shooting of
Israeli ambassador Shlomo Argov in
London which triggered the Lebanon
war.
But the Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine, the extremist
PLO faction which mounted the Munich
Olympics assault, remains a focal point
of international terrorism.
PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat
renounced terrorism in the mid-1970s.
But as one Arafat aide put it, "If
established governments cannot con-
trol all of their own people, how can you
expect us to?"
INTELLIGENCE sources say
Israel's invasion of Lebanon cut into
arms supplies to European groups and
dismantled PLFP training centers.
But one U.S. specialist sums up the
lingering problem:
"Even if you get the big guys, there
are the little ones who get together in a
back room' and decide to use terror for
some cause. You can only wait to see
what they do. It's a fact of life."

'Even if you get the big guys, there are the little
ones who get together in a back room and decide to
use terror for some cause. You can only wait and

I OR

I

Coming Soon
Look for
-MOV IE
in the
next
issue
of your
4r college
news-
paper.

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