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November 21, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-21

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Page 2-Sunday, November 21, 1982-The Michigan Daily
NEW TACTICS HARDER TO COMBAT

Terrorists elude security efforts

EDITOR 'S NOTE- Ten years
ago, Palestinian commandos
massacred 11 Israelis at the Munich
Olympic games, riveting world at-
.tention on international terrorism.
Today, terrorism eludes a growing
net work of security forces,
spreading steadily in ever-changing
Patterns.
By MORT ROSENBLUM
AP Special Correspondent
AMSTERDAM (AP)- A Dutch
Justice Ministry official, palms spread
in futility, is blunt: "Eliminating
terrorism is an absolute impossibility.
OK, we're ready for the hijackings and
hostage-taking. But for most of it, we
can only sit and wait."
In a decade of containing terrorism,
Italy shattered the Red Brigades and
West Germany all but obliterated the
Baader-Meinhof group. Dutch marines,

behind the roar of diving jets, recap-
tured a train, persuading hijackers that
terror will not free the Moluccan islan-
ds from Indonesia.
But European and U.S officials say
groups are springing up faster than
police can track them. And, they say,
entrenched nationalists, "Palestinians,
Irish and others," use new tactics to
elude authorities who cooperate only
partially across borders.
"THESE NEW groups are very
small, very aggressive and very
dangerous," the Dutch specialist says,
asking the anonymity that is customary
in this delicate area. "And the old
problems remain."
If terrorist groups do not threaten
governments' survival, officials say,
they push free societies toward
repressive measures, forcing innocent
citizens onto a vaguely defined bat-
tlefield.
On Aug. 9 in Paris, terrorists burst in-
to Jo Goldenberg's delicatessen and
sprayed gunfire, killing six people.
FRANCE suffered 112 incidents in a
30-day period this summer, many of
them victimless bombings by Corsican
autonomists.
In Italy, where terrorism is declining,
leftists and rightists struck 428 times in
See WORLD, Page 6

Nominations Are Now Being
Accepted for the
Rackham Pre- Doctoral
Rak o iP e Fellowships
For students who have substantially com-
pleted all course requirements and depart-
mental exams required for admission to
candidacy; Stipend plus Tuition for 2'/2
terms.
STUDENTS MUST BE NOMINATED
BY THEIR DEPARTMENT
Deadline: Feb. 4, 1983
For further information contact
the Fellowship Office 764-2218

AP Photo
This was the scene moments after terrorist bomb blast in east Beirut two
months ago, which killed Lebanon's president-elect Bashir Gemayel at his
Christian Phalangist party's headquarters.
- I

TUESDAY LUNCH DISCUSSION
12 NOON
November 23, 1982
"INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN"
Speaker: DR. JON HEISE, Director,
The International Center, U. of M.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Salvadoran troops retake towns
held by leftist guerrillas
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador- Hundreds of troops began leaving
Chalatenango Province in north El Salvador after retaking four of six towns
seized by leftist rebels last month, military sources said yesterday.
One of the sources, who asked not be named, said the military suffered 40
dead and 60 wounded during the 10-day operation by 5,000 soldiers. The
Defense Ministry has refused to disclose army casualties.
It was not immediately clear if the entire operation had ended or if only
part of the force was leaving the area, which rebels opposed to the U.S.-
backed government attacked last month in a major offensive. The sources
also did not explain why the army retook the rebel-held towns 50 miles north
of San Salvador. The Defense Ministry earlier claimed it did not consider the
towns valuable because they were worthless "ghost towns."
Soviet officials say Andropov
leads candidates for president
MOSCOW- Yuri Andropov, the new Soviet Communist Party chief, has
consolidated his power far more rapidly than expected and now appears to
be the top candidate to assume the late Leonid Brezhnev's other post, that of
president, Soviet sources and Communist diplomats say.
When Brezhnev died Nov. 10, the betting was that Andropov held the edge
in taking Brezhnev's party post but no one ruled out Konstantin Chernenko,
Brezhnev's long-time friend and aide.
In the past few days, sources have confirmed that Andropov, 68, and Cher-
nenko, 71, waged a tough battle to succeed Brezhnev but that Andropov won
after getting the support of Defense Minister Dmitri Ustinov, Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko and Ukrainian party boss Vladimir Sherbitsky.
When Andropov was named general secretary of the party two days after
Brezhnev died, it was believed that Chernenko would be named president, a
job which confers head-of-state status. He is still seen as having an outside
shot at the job-but only if Andropov has decided that he doesn't want it.
Pope attacks mafia in Sicily
PALERMO, Sicily- A heavily guarded Pope John Paul II traveled to this
Mafia stronghold yesterday and lashed out at the wave of "barbarous
violence" that has claimed 130 lives in gangland murders this year, in-
cluding four just hours before his arrival.
Police picked up two West Germans and an Austrian carrying empty car-
tridge magazines and a bayonet in backpacks near the papal route two hours
before the pope got to Palermo. However, they had no guns, police said.
Police said two of the men would be placed under formal arrest but did not
say what they would be charged with. They said later they did not believe the
incident was linked to the papal visit, but refused to elaborate.
The pope was shot and wounded by a Turkish extremist in St. Peter's
Square on May 13, 1981 and a year later escaped unharmed when charged by
a bayonet-wielding renegade Spanish priest in Fatima, Portugal. After his
motorcade passed just yards from the spot where Italy's top crime fighter
was assassinated in September, the pope went to a palm-lined central square
Saturday and threw down an immediate challenge to Palermo authorities
and citizens to put an end to the killings.
PLO renews effort to free
captured American in Lebanon4
DAMASCUS, Syria- The Palestine Liberation Organization has renewed
its efforts for the release of David Dodge, the acting president of the
American University of Beirut who was kidnapped four months ago.'
A PLO source here said the kidnappers are getting nervous and at one
point threatened to kill the 58-year-old Dodge, but a top PLO official urged
them not to and has personally taken charge of attempts to win Dodge's
freedom.
Dodge, abducted July 19 from the American University of Beirut campus
during the Israeli siege of West Beirut, is still in good health, according to
the well-placed source who declined use of his name.
"We know exactly who has him," he added. "We are talking with them."
The PLO official said the name of the small, radical group that abducted
Dodge was known to the PLO but it was not part of the PLO.
Western and Lebanese sources in Beirut have said they believe Dodge was
abducted by a small group of Pro-Iranian Lebanese radicals who had broken
away from Amal, a political and paramilitary organization of Lebanese
Shiite Moslems who follow the teachings of Iran's- Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini.
Walesa meets with Polish bishop
WARSAW, Poland- Solidarity leader Lech Walesa met yesterday in War-
saw with Archbishop Jozef Glemp, Roman Catholic primate of Poland. It
was the former union leader's first trip outside his Gdansk home since his
release last week from 11 months of imprisonment.
There was no word of the subject of the 2 -hour meeting between Walesa
and Glemp, who had personally appealed for the Solidarity leader's release.
The last reported meeting between the two men took place four days
before martial law was imposed on Dec. 13 and Walesa was taken into deten-
tion.
Aides would not say whether the meeting had any connection with a U.S.
television report that security agents had attempted to smear Walesa by
showing sexually "compromising" pictures, tapes and documents to church

officials.
Walesa, wearing a gray suit with a Black Madonna badge in its lapel and
carrying a bunch of flowers, looked serious when he left the primate's palace
in Warsaw's Old Town shortly after 2:30 p.m.
Vol. XCIII, No. 64
Sunday, November 21, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
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at the
International Center for additional information,
603 E. Madison St. please call 662-5529
Co-sponsored by The Ecumenical Campus Center, The International Center,
Church Women United in Ann Arbor.

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Editor-in-chief DAVID MEYER
Monaging Editor PAMELA KRAMER
News Editor ANDREW CHAPMAN
Student Affoirs Editor ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor MARK GINDIN
Opinion Page Editors JULIE HINDS
CHARLES THOMSON
Arts Mogozine Editor RICHARD CAMPBELL
Associate Arts Magazine Editor BEN TICHO
Sports Editor BOB WOJNOWSKI
Associote Sports Editors BARB BARKER
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK
Photogrophy Editor . . .. .. . BRIAN MASCK
ARTISTS Norm Christiansen Pete Sinclair Jon

Joe Ewing. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter, Chuck Jaffe.
Robin Kopilnick, Doug Levy, Tim Mokinen, Mike
McGraw, Larry Mishkin. Liso Noferi, Rob Pollord. Don
Price, Jeff Quicksilver. Paul Resnick, Wendy Rocha.
Lenny Rosenb..um. Scott Solowich. John Toyer, Judy
Walton, Karl Wheatley. Chuck Whitman, Rich Wiener.
Steve Wise. BUSINESS

Business Manager
Sales Manager
Display Manager
Finance Manager
Assistant Display Manager.
Operations/National Manager
Circulation Manager
Sales Coordinator..
Classified Manager

JOSEPH G. BRODA
KATHRYN HENDRICK
ANN SACHAR
SAM G SLAUGHTER IV
.... PAMELA GOULD
LINDSAY BRAY
KIM WOOD
E ANDREW PETERSEN
PAM GILLERY

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