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September 10, 1982 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-10

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Paae 6-Fridav. September 10, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Israel rejects, Arab

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FEZ, Morocco (AP)- Israel rejected
an all-Arab plan for a Middle East set-
tlement that implies recognition of the
state of Israel for the first time, and
meanwhile sent warplanes against
Syrian anti-aircraft missiles in
Lebanon for the second straight day.
Lebanese radio said Israeli jets also
struck Syrian armor positions in
Lebanon, heightening the threat of a
showdown between the tens of thousan-
ds of Israeli and Syrian troops
remaining in that war-battered land.
SOURCES AT the Arab summit con-
ference in Fez, Morocco, said the Arab
leaders approved Syrian President
Hafez Assad's request to cancel the .6-
year-old Arab League mandate for his
Syrian "peacekeeping force" in
Lebanon, enabling him to withdraw the
troops. But Israel questioned Assad's
sincerity.
"I think this (Syrian readiness to
leave Lebanon) is lip service and there
is no reality in it," Chief of Staff Lt.
Gen. Raphael Eytan told Israeli army
radio.
"It is a political tactic. In my opinion,
the Syrians have made every effort to
stay in Lebanon for a long time."
THE FEZ summit, concluding late
yesterday, produced the first collective
Arab proposals for peace with Israel
since the creation of the Jewish state in
1948.
The proposals were not immediately
made public, but as high-level-
delegation sources outlined the plan, it
contained elements long rejected-by the
Israelis: the creation of an indepen-
dent, PLO-governed Palestinian state
in the Israeli-occupied West Bank of the
Jordan River and Gaza Strip, and in-

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e plan
corporating the Arab-populated sector
of Jerusalem in that state.
The reported proposals do not e-
plicitly offer recognition of Israel. >
IN ISRAEL, Prime Minister
Menachem Begin's spokesman, Uri
Porat, dismissed the summit, saying it
was no different from previous such
meetings "and there is no reason to pay
attention to it.
"They don't recognize Israel and they
speak of the PLO as the sole represen-
tative of the Palestinian people," he
said.
The Begin government has offered
limited autonomy to the 1.3 million
Palestinian Arabs of the West Bank and
Gaza, insists on ultimate Israeli
sovereignty over the territories,
refuses to deal with the PLO, and sas
all of Jerusalem will forever be Israeli.
All the 22 Arab countries except
Libya and Egypt took part in the sum-
mit, 15 of them at chief-of-state level.
Libya boycotted the meeting and Egypt
was barred because of its separate
peace treaty with Israel.
The Israeli air attacks on Syrian
missile positions Wednesday and
yesterday marked an escalation in the
Lebanon confrontation one week after
the completion of the PLO guerrilla
pullout from Beirut.
The Israeli military command repor-
ted yesterday its warplanes returned to
the same area and knocked out four of
the mobile SAM-9 batteries. No Israeli
planes were lost, it said.
A Syrian military spokesman in*
Damascus said the jets hit "three air
defense vehicles." He gave no other
details.
w hurdle,
doesn't come to us, we have to work to
get it." Cohen said nearly one-third of
all research grant money goes to the
University for research administrative
costs.
"Over the past three or four years,
for every dollar of general fund support
for research, the Institute has been able
to get five dollars in outside support"
he said. "Cutting that money wouldnt
save anything. J
"But," he added, "Vice President
Frye understands our problem and 'I
think the cuts that are made will be fair
to us."
Frye would not speculate on the even-
tual decision of the executive officers,
but he expressed dismay about
negative attitudes in the University
community about the review process.
"I've had some concern about at-
titudes that a reviewmnecessarily means
closure," he said. "There are many
outcomes other than closure."
h
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AP Photo
ISRAELI PRIME Minister Menachem Begin waves a copy of the Camp
David accords Wednesday as he debates President Reagan's peace
proposals. Israel rejected both the Reagan and Arab summit plans.

ILIR clears first revie

(Continued from Page 1)
ting funds to high priority areas.
BY CUTTING ILIR's budget, the sub-
committee expects the University
would save nearly $150,000 per year.
The subcommittee's report involves
three major recommendations: ILIR,
primarily a research institute, should
stop offering courses taught by non-
faculty staff members; the University
should offer no additional support for
research; and funds to the Labor
Studies Center should be continued,
while the center looks for other sources
of money.
ILIR's total budget is $1,460,000. The
institute receives $360,000 from the
University's General Fund.
The institute's achievements have
been carefully publicized by ILIR,
which gave out its own press releases
this summer, gathered supportive let-
ters, and held a 25th anniversary

celebration in June.
ILIR HAS trained more than 10,000
state workers in the past 10 years,
Cohen said in defense of the institute.
"Innovative research and action
programs to aid the men and women of
this country, that's the theme of our in-
stitute," he said.
The institute is now under contract
with the U.S. Department of Labor to
study immigrants and their em-
ployment patterns, to research where
jobs are being created, and to develop
training programs for unemployed
workers.
Although Cohen said he is happy with
the way the review was conducted, he
said the administration's proposed
General Fund cuts to the institute
would be "devastating."'
"WE NEED General Fund support to
fund staffers to get reporters for out-
side funding," he said. "The money

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