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November 16, 1982 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-16

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 16, 1982-Page 3

Council debates street

By KRISTIN STAPLETON
The Ann Arbor City Council last night
tabled a plan that would make parts of
two campus streets one way thorough-
fares and add a traffic signal at an ad-
joining intersection.
Council asked Acting City Ad-
ministrator Godfrey Collins to provide
more information about how the
alterations of Thompson, Monroe, and
Packard Streets would affect the
residents of that district and the traffic
flow on those roads.
THE PROPOSED alterations, which
were requested by the State Street

Merchant's Association to relieve con-
gestion, would make Thompson Street
one way from William to Jefferson,
Monroe Street one way from Packard
to State Street, add a traffic signal at
the Packard/Monroe/Thompson inter-
section, and remove the stop sign at
Thompson and Madison.
Collins indicatedthat the city tran-,
sportation department is also con-
sidering eliminating the Monroe access
onto Packard by making it a dead end
street.
Council tabled the motion until next
week despite requests from the mer-
chant's association to have the changes

completed before the beginning of the
holiday season.
Larry Hunter (D-First Ward) said he
was concerned that the city is becoming
"cluttered with traffic signals." He
questioned the city's method of deter-
mining where signals should be placed.
Raphael Ezekiel (D-Third Ward)
agreed. "I'm dubious about the cost-
benefit of putting that new light up," he
said.
The traffic issue was the only con-
troversial resolution brought up at the
brief and unusually harmonious council
meeting. The meeting was not
marked by the partisan bickering that
so often occurs at council meetings.

hanges
In other business, council "voted to
amend an ordinance to allow a
restaurant to be built on the northeast
corner of Huron and State Streets. It-
also approved measures to aid residen-
ts whose homes were damaged by
spring flooding.
The council also approved resolutions=
to purchase a dump truck and under-
body scrapers. Virginia Johansen (D-
Third Ward) reported that the Hunger
Coalition- which the city provided
$2,500 to serve meals to the poor - is
serving about 90 people per meal and is
in need of volunteers.
Mayor Louis Belcher was absent.

MIT tops list of

AP Photo
Aerial Illusion
Though this may look like a scene from a new Hollywood feature, the top car
is ac tually a picture painted on a billboard along a highway in metropolitan
Cincinnati.
HAPPENINGS
Hghlight
Today is the last day of LSA-Student Government elections for president,
vice president, and 15 candidates-at-large seats. Poll sites are: Michigan
Union, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; UGLi, 3:30 p.m.-7 p.m.; Fishbowl, 8:45 a.m.-3:15
p.m.; East Quad, 4 p.m.-6 p.m.; South Quad, 4:15 p.m.-6:15 p.m.; West
Quad, 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.; Bursley, 3:45 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Vote, vote, vote!
Democracy still matters.
Films
CFT-The Man Who Knew Too Much, 7 & 10:20 p.m.; The Wrong Man, 8:30
p.m., Michigan Theater.
AAFC-Apocalypse Now, 6:30 & 9:15 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Cinema Guild-A Man Escaped, 7 p.m. & 9:05 p.m., orch Hall.
Performances
School of Music-Piano Concert Recital, doctoral students of Theodore
Lettvin, 8p.m., Recital Hall.
Michigan Union Arts Program-International Arts Series, Malini
Srirama, dancer, "Arts in India," 12:30 p.m., Kuenzel Rm.
Speakers
Alliance Francaise D'Ann Arbor-Jonathan Ngate, "African Perspective
of Mitterand Government in France,"8 p.m., Rackham, W. COnf. Room.
Economics-Hans Ehrbar, "The Political Economy of World Peace VII:
The American Peace Movement: What Kind of Peace?" 7 p.m., 1429 Mason
Hall.
Chinese Studies-Steven C. Davidson, "Calendars, Cosmology, and Early
Imperial Confucianism," noon, Lane Hall Commons Rm.
Bioengineering-Robert Andres, "Biodynamic Modeling," 4 p.m., 1042 E.
Eng.
Committee on Southern Africa-David Gordon, "South Africa: Obser-
vation of a Society in Conflict," noon, CAAS Lounge, 407 Lorch.
Art-Emmett Leith, "Holography," 4 p.m., Art & Arcg.; Patrick Murphy,
Workshop on laser work, 7 p.m., 2210 Art & Arch.
Int'l Ctr.-Andreau Tryphonas, "The Cyprus Problem," noon, Int'l Ctr.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Support Group for FLOC-7:30 p.m., 308 E. William.
Baptist Student Union-7 p.m., 2435 Mason.
Ann Arbor Go-Club-7 p.m., 1433 Mason.
CEW-Informal Drop-in Job Hunt Club, noon, Ctr. Library.
His House Christian Fellowship-Fellowship and Bible Study, 7:30 p.m.,
925 E. Ann.
Society of Christian Engineers-Noon, 315 W. Eng.
Students Counseling Office-Goal Planning Workshop, 10 p.m., E. Quad.
Cross-Country Ski Club-Racing and Touring mtg., Films, The Cross-
Country Experience, 7:30 p.m., 429 Mason.
U-M Bicycle Club-8 p.m., 1084 E. Eng.
Impact Jazz Co.-Workshop, A. Boda, 7 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Aikido Club-5 p.m., Sports Bldg.
Univ. Lesbian Network-6:30 p. m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
The Rudolph Steiner Institute-Prof. Emer. E. Katz, "The Human Soul
After Death," Steiner Institute, 1923 Geddes Ave.
Chemistry - Departmental colloquium, Prof. Frank Weinhold, "Bond
Orbital Studies of Molecular Structure and Interactions," 4 p.m., Rm. 1300,
Chem. Bldg.
Ann Arbor Public Library-Althea Helbig, "Imagination's Neglected
Places," 7:30 p.m., Public Library, 343 S. Fifth Ave.
CEW-"GRE, LSAT, GMAT: Getting Ready," Admission and the Exam-
Taking Process: Panel discussion with women who have succeeded, 7:30
p.m., Rackham E. COnf. Rm.
Russian & East European Studies-Discussion for enrolled students only, 4
p.m., 200 Lane Hall.
Folk Dance Club-Beginners' class, 7-8:30 p.m.; Intermediate
Macedonian class, 8:30-10 p.m., dance studio, 3rd floor corner-of State and
William.
University Cross Country Ski CLub-general meeting and free film "The
Cross Country Experience," Mason Hall, rm. 439.
Students' Counseling Office-goal planning workshop, 10 p.m., East Quad,
Room 124.
Tau Beta Pi-elective meeting, 7:30 p.m., 140 Administration Bldg.
Miscellaneous
Near Eastern and North African Studies-Language Roundtable (in
Arabic), Wafa Wahba, "The Development of Egyptian Education:
Economic and Political Repercussion," 2 p.m., B137 MLB.
Museum of Art-Art Break, Ann Benner, "What's In a Name?" 12:20 p.m..

most costl
NEW YORK (AP)- What's this
year's most expensive college? One
newly published college guide puts the
student tab at $12,250, a second says
$13,500. But no one disputes that the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
tops the list.
Still, some highly selective schools
remain not only affordable, but
downright cheap. "Competitive
Colleges," just published by Peterson's
Guides in Princeton, N.J., lists Cooper
Union in New York as the least expen-
sive college. Students pay a $300 annual
fee to cover items like student activities
and yearbooks, but no tuition.
THE 123-YEAR-old private school
pulls this off with the help of a $43.9
million endowment started by its 19th
century founder, New York
businessman Peter Cooper, who once
said that "education should be as free
as air and water."
A second recently published guide,
the College Board's "College Cost
Book," lists the total cost for a year at
all 3,200 public and private colleges, in-
cluding tuition and fees, room and
board, books and personal expenses.
The book doesn't separately list the
most expensive schools, but board
spokesman Fred Moreno says MIT's
$13,500 is tops. A year ago, small, highly
competitive Bennington College in
Vermont was listed as most expensive
at $12,030.
"COMPETITIVE Colleges" focuses
on what it considers the 296 most selec-
tive schools. Unlike the College Board's
guide, it includes separate lists of the 10
most and least expensive colleges, but
does not include in its cost estimates a
student's expected personal expenses.
So MIT also places first in the guide,
but is said to cost just $12,250.
The remaining most expensive
schools in the guide are Bennington,
$12,140; Harvard-Radcliffe, $12,100; St.
John's College, in Annapolis, Md.,
$11,900; Barnard College, $11,842; Yale
CORRECTION
In a story yesterday ("Mayor vetoes
controversial plan"), the Daily in-
correctlyreported thata University
class taught by city councilmember
Rapbael Ezekiel would get $15,000 from
the city to pay for a survey of city
human services. Actually, the city
allocated only $5,000, to be spent by the
Ann Arbor Community Development
Department, for the costs of that sur-
vey, which would have been conducted
by Ezekiel's class.

colleges
University, $11,790; Tufts University,
$11,763; Bard College, $11,762; Sarah
Lawrence College, $11,750; and Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, $11,700.
The nine least expensive schools,
besides Cooper Union, are California
State University, Hayward, $345; North
Carolina State University, Raleigh,
$2,672; University of Missouri-
Columbia, $2,718; Virginia Polytechnic
Institute, $2,784; Auburn University,
$2,790; New Mexico Institute of Mining
and Technology, $2,828; Virginia
Military Institute, $2,860; University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, $2,876; and
University of Missouri, Kansas City,
$2,903.

ROSE BOWL'1
Flights to Los Angeles
from $284
Rose Bowl Tours Available
from $577 per person including Air
HURRY-Space very limited

* u telius
wX ayou want.
Your AftCarved representative will be on campus soon to show you the
latest in class ring designs. With dozens of styles to choose from, you'll be proud to select
your one-of-a-kind design. Just tell us what you want. And be on the
lookout for posters on campus to get you where you want.

t

Date:

NOVEMBER 15-19

ARTQARVED

Location: University Cellar

I I

AGAM}
ANT
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including.
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Friend Or Foe
Goody Two Shoes
Sornething Girls AOAM ANT
FRIEND OR FOE
THE JOHN LENNON
C O E C T O N

LUTHER VANDROSS
FOREVER, FOR ALWAYS, FOR LOVE
including:
Bad Boy/Having A Party
You're The Sweetest One
Since I Lost My Baby/Better Love
She Loves~ Me Back

OO
X10

imno

LP's and
cassettes
are always
the same
price

Check
out
our
import
department

$5.99 each

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