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September 09, 1982 - Image 73

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-09

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V V U U U U V

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e 14-E-Thursday, September 9, 1982-The Michigan, Daily

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The Michigan Dai-Thursday, Septemt

It's 21 in town,
but drinking is easy

(Continued from Page 7)
"I don't think any of the (liquor)
stores are selling to underage people,"
said Dave. He added that recently,
liquor stores are enforcing the law
more strictly.
Jeff, however, explained one simple
way that minors obtain alcohol from
liquor stores. "Whenever a friend who
is 21 is going down to a store to buy
some (alcohol), you just ask him to pick
you up something."
"I've asked people I don't even know

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to buy (alcohol) for me and they've said
'sure,' "said Kathy, a 19-year-old LSA
sophomore.
According to Jeff, getting thrown out
of a bar is more of a worry to minors
than being arrested for drinking. "A
friend of mine and I went into (Good
Time) Charley's and the bouncer didn't
give us any problems," he explained.
"Then my friend tried to order a drink
and they asked him to leave."
Kathy, however, said, "It's a lot
easier in a bar" than in a liquor store to
purchase alcohol. Daye agreed, saying,
"I've found I've been able to buy at all
the (popular campus) bars." He also
noted that some bars are less strict
early in the evening, when they are less
crowded.
Underage drinking in bars "depends
on the bar," said Jeff. "I have someone
else actually buy the drink."
"We do the best we can" to uphold
the law, said Steve Crowley, a manager
at Rick's American Cafe, 611 Church St.
He said one of the biggest problems
they have is that many underaged
people come to Rick's for the music.
"I question the ambiguity of the law
in allowing 18- to 21-year-olds into the
bar," Crowley said. "That's what
causes problems."
Restaurants are the easiest place in
which minors can get served alcohol,
according to both Dave and Kathy.
When she celebrated her 19th birthday
at a popular local restaurant, Kathy
said she bought drinks with her meal
and paid for them with a check. The
waitress saw Kathy's driver's license,
with her correct age on it, as proof of
identification, but said nothing except
to warn her to always buy alcohol with
cash.
The Ann Arbor Police Department is
"extremely effective" in enforcing the
21-year-old drinking age law, according
to Chief William Corbett.
The method the police currently are
employing to enforce the drinkinglaws
has come under fire in the past year.
"We use young (underage) agents,
working for the police," Corbett said,
who enter a bar of liquor store and at-
tempt to purchase alcohol. Most of
the youths are members of the Ex-
plorer Scouts organization.
"I just got set up," said Cathy Cruise,
a waitress at Rick's. "Two Eagle
Scouts came in here and ordered a
Strohs," she explained. "They had
'paid' stamps (on their hands), which I
thought were '21' stamps. I gave (beer)
to them and a detective came up behind
me and told me I sold the alcohol to a
.minor."
Although Gruise's case never went to
court, there have been several trials for
the sale of alcohol to minors in the past
years, many of which were won by the
person charged with the sale.
"I suppose it's the only way" to en-
force the law, said Kathy about the un-
derage police agents. "It just seems a
little too sneaky. I think it's sort of
-useless having those little kids go up
and buy (alcohol)." She said the police
department should be more direct in
their approach to enforce the law.
The penalty for underage drinking, a
misdemeanor, is a $25 fine for first of-
fenders and a $50 fine and required par-
ticipation in an alcohol education
program for repeat offenders, accor-
ding to Marsha Wilson, Washtenaw
County deputy court clerk for civil in-
fractions. The instances of underage
college students being caught drinking

0*11m,-

Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
EUGENE LISANSKY, WCBN general manager, selects the next album for
play.
'U' tunes from either
end of the radio dial

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By Sarah Bassett
Tune to 88.3 on the FM dial and you
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to Fats Domino, folk songs to blues.
Spin the dial to 91.7 FM, on the other
hand, and you might hear Beethoven,
Bartok or Brahms.
WCBN and WUOM are the Univer-
sity's own radio stations. While both air
from campus studios, and both serve
the Ann Arbor and University com-
munities, the similarities end about
there. One is student-run; one is
professionally-staffed. Each station has
its own style, and each has different op-
portunities for students.

WCBN, the student-run station, has a
varied format. For a good part of each
24-hour day, the station airs "free-
form" music-meaning just about
anything goes according to each
deejay's tastes. You might catch a
polka or a sonata, reggae or new wave
rock.
The rest of the day, WCBN airs music
specials and public affairs programs.
Topics can range from women's con-
cerns to nutritional information to gay
rights. Some of the station's regular
programs are produced in cooperation
with such special interest groups. Sun-
day night's "Studio Live" gives
See 'U', Page 15

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