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November 13, 1982 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-13

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, November 13, 1982-Page 3

Candidate to tap student energy

By ROB FRANK
Rajeev Samantrai said he was first
interested in LSA-SG as a forum for his
own gripes about the University. Now,
the sophomore hopes to become its next
president.
LSA-SG "tends to attract disenchan-
ted students, and I thought student
government would be a good forum for
LSA-SG
ELECTIONS
effective change," Samantrai said.
HAVING worked on Michigan
Student Assembly committees in the
past, the presidential hopeful applied
for one of the vacancies which opened
this fall on the LSA body. After two
a months in the position, he said he now

t
t
t

feels he can handle the presidency.
"It's a more interesting job (than coun-
cilmember)," he explained.
Among Samantrai's concerns are
student involvement, TA training, and
communication with the students he
hopes to represent. "We have to keep
talking up student government," he
said. "There's a lot of energy out there
to be tapped."
As for the role of LSA-SG, Samantrai
said the primary responsibility will be
advocating student concerns. "We have
to work with other groups and with
students to decide if an issue is ap-
propriate for students.
SAMANTRAI will be running on the
SAID slate because "SAID and I have
similar interests including strong
directed leadership." He says that he is
"more aware of the issues, and more
committed to the issues" than his
rivals, LEED 83's Barry Powers and

indepentent Mike Jones. -
Despite recently released data
showing black enrollment to be at 4.7
percent, Samantrai believes the figure
to be much lower. He says that if elec-
ted, raising the sagging enrollment will
be a high priority of his. "We have to
get more black students here and when
they're here we have to make sure we
don't ignore them," he said.
Among his suggestions for achieving
this is to have students accompany
recruiters when they visit high schools.
Samantrai said he would extend the
Bridge Program, which brings
minority students to the University for
the summer before they begin classes.
Samantrai was critical of those who
downplay the role of student gover-
nment in University policy-making. "a
lot of people say 'don't work on student
government because we don't get
anything done.' But slowly, we are
getting things done."

.Safintrai
.inicrease black enrolnment

International Week
festivities begin

4 pm

Tickets Available at Revelli Hall
and at the door.

By THOMAS MILLER
Celebrating both the variety of
cultures and nationalities on the
University campus, and its 21st an-
niversary, the Ecumenical Campus
Center will kick off International Week
1982, beginning tonight.
The festival should "establish a
sound understanding between people of
all nations, (let them) see and enjoy the
vitality of the world's peole, and also
draw attention to the wonderful ser-
vices of the ECC," said Ema
Ema, the coordinator of this year's
events and a University graduate
student from Nigeria.
SENIOR Raymond Ginepro, another
ECC resident and festival organizer,
noted that the community will play an
important rule. "We want to get people
of the community to interact with
foreign students and to understand dif-
ferent cultures."
A variety of activities have been
planned, because as, Ema added, "We
would like to appeal to the entire com-

munity to make it a successful week."
The festivities begin tonight with In-
ternational Disco Night, at 9 p.m., at
the ECC, 921 Church. The rest of the
week's activities include films, slide
shows, lectures, dances, and exhibits
featuring more than 10 countries. The
final event is an open house on Sunday,
Nov. 21, at 2 p.m., at the ECC.
GINEPRO said he feels the
Exhibition of Arts and Crafts and
Friday's International Cultural Night
are expecially good because, "these
events give you a good feeling for the
other cultures."
The ECC is a residence for foreign
students, but its work goes beyond
merely providing shelter. Its directors
sponsor many activities for all foreign
students, not just residents.
Several campus grouups are helping
sponsor this week's events, including
the Michigan Student Assembly,
Rackham Student Government, The In-
ternational Center, and the Office of
Student Services.

For more info, call 764-0582

Donation

$2

U I

I

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1

I[ N RO

SAT,.* SUN

L INDIVIDUAL THEATRES shows before
5th Ave o Lberty 761S700 6:00 pm.
"A fine sensiti
.' ~film"-King TV
"Believable a
eminitely likeab
4- O~4t~g~~~~ 0-seattlI
Captured the vulnerabili
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FR I-MONif
6:40, 8:30, 10:20 Discover a new way to fal inElove.
SAT, SUN--1:10, 3:00, 4:50, 6:40, 8:301-10:20 (PG)

ive
News
nd
le"
Is P.I.
ite
rd'
rican

Pointer Party Daily Photo by DAVID FRANIEL
Freshperson Kim Easterle anxiously watches as June Pointer of the Pointer
Sisters signs an autograph for her, at a bash held in the Union Ballroom
yesterday.
Highlight
An African Arts and Crafts exhibition and dance are being held tonight at
the Trotter House, 1443 Washtenaw, sponsored by the African Students
Association, Michigan Student Assembly, and Trotter House. The exhibit
will be held from 1-6:30 p.m. and the dance begins at 9 p.m.
Films
Mediatrics-Body Heat, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Nat Sci.
Cinema II-Mr. Klein, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Gargoyle Films-M*A*S*H, 7 p.m., Catch-22, 9:15 p.m.,
Cinema Guild - Last Tango in Paris, 7 & 9:20 p.m., Lorch Hall.
AAFC-Chariots of Fire, 7 & 9:15 p.m., MLB 4.
Alt. Act.-La Cage Aux Folles, 7 & 10:25 p.m., La Cage Aux Folles II, 8:40
p.m., MLB 3.
Hill St.-The Harder They Come, 7 & 9 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Performances
School of Music-Trumpet recital, CatherineBarnes, 4 p.m., and Armando
Ghitalla, 8p.m., Recital Hall.
Theatre and Drama-"The -Trojan Women," 8 p.m., New Trueblood
Arena.
UAC Soundstage-The Vincent York Quintet with Marcus Belgrave, 9:30-
1:30 p.m., U-Club, Michigan Union.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Go-Club-2-7 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
Women's Aglow Fellowship of Ann Arbor-9:30 a.m., Holiday Inn-West,
2900 Jackson.'Rd.
Miscellaneous
Tae Kwon Do Club-practice, 9-11 a.m., Martial Arts Rm., CCRB.
Football-Michigan vs. Purdue, 1 p.m., Michigan Stadium.
Friends of Traditional Music/Folklore Society-old-time square and con-
tra-dance, 8 p.m., Law Quad.
Museum of Art-"Major Works from the .Collection of John Philip
Kassebaum," 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Museum of Art.
Union of Students for Israel-coffee house, 8:30 p.m., Green Lounge, East
Quad.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
fappenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

Profs react to new leader

(Continued from Page 1)
image or reputation, Meyer said.
"There's no reason why he (Yuri An-
dropov) should disassociate himself
with the KGB."
HISTORY Professor William Rosen-
berg added that it was no worse than
U.S. Vice President George Bush being
former CIA director.
Rosenberg described Andropov as
"very knowledgeable and very in-
telligent, a sophisticated fellow." He
added that Andropov "has a reputation
of being tough."
Meyer said that although he thinks
Andropov is known for being a "soft-
liner," he doesn't know if the reputation
is deserved.
POLITICAL science Professor
Raymond Taras said that he thought
the leadership change might lead the
U.S. to test Andropov,scomparing it to
the Cuban missile crisis when he said
the Soviets tested the new U.S.
president, John Kennedy.
"I think America might be tempted to
do something of the same kind to test
Andropov," he said, adding that he
thought such an action would be un-
wise.

Although Andropov is 68-years old,
Meyer said he thinks the Soviet gover-
nment may start to shift to younger
members. "Within ten years,
everybody in the Politboro will be
gone," he said, adding that he sees a
"major shift between the Brezhnev
generation and the generation that will
replace him."
HE SAID that this new generation
"may be significantly younger - not five
years, but fifteen."
Singer agreed, saying he sees three
or four years of transition after which
'probably some younger guys will
emerge."
History Professor William Rosenberg
said he thought the U.S. was wrong in
sending only a "relatively minor
delegation" to Brezhnev's funeral.

THE MOST PRAISED AND LOVED ROMANTIC
FILM OF THE SEASON

THE FILM THAT "LIFTS YOU UP
WHERE YOU BELONG" HAS THE
NUMBER ONE HIT SINGLE Richar
IN THE COUNTRY Gere
AN OFFICER Debra
AND A Winge
GENTLEMAN
FRI-MON-7:10, 9:20
SAT, SUN-12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:10, 9:20

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