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November 12, 1982 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-12

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Page 10-Friday, November 12, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Small turnout mars
arms buildup forum
(continued from Page 1)
Levin said he recently talked with warheads last year, urged the audience
former President Jimmy Carter and that "it's a short time span before this
asked him if he ever felt vulnerable to a thing gets out of hand."
Soviet attack. "He told me that he never "I'm nervous about talking about
felt vulnerable," Levin said. "He post-Reagan administrations as the
always felt confident that we could time for getting the nuclear freeze
deter the Soviets. passed," she said. It may be too late,
The "window of vulnerability" she said, because many of the deadly
President Reagan is fond of referring to nuclear weapons. will have already
is nothing more than a myth, Levin been built and ready for action.
said. RUSH'S criticisms weren't limited to
"We allow the Soviets to determine the government, however. The major
our defense budget," Levin said. "If media have had a hand in slowing the
they build more, we build more freeze movement, she said, by deciding
whether w need it or not " that civil disobedience-such as her ac-
Yesterday's convocations werelion with the Plowshares 8-shouldnt
organized by a netword of large e d
national professional groups - scien- The people who take part in such ac-
tists, engineers, doctors, lawyers - that tivities do so because they won't sit
have been interested for years in back and be passive when their moral
educating the public about nuclear ar- and religious beliefs are put in jeopar-
ns. Business has been booming recen- dy, she said. "They don't do it to make a
tly - last Nov. 11, 170 campuses ran media splash," she said. "We're not
freeze convocations, and last April 350 fearless, heroic people, but peoplewho
frezconvogstjnsd laare not willing to let go of what we
more colleges joined in. believe in."
"WE WANT people to realize that Nancy Bailey, one of the few students
passage of the Nuclear freeze is not at at the conference, said that although
all the last thing to be done," said she enjoyed the speeches, she thought
Residential College student Sandra the one-sidedness hurt their effec-
Gregerman, one of the local organizers. tiveness. "I thought maybe they should
"We need further organizing in the present some of the opposing views,
communities, in churches, in social too," said the third-year nursing
groups, to keep building the momentum student. "It would probably have
we have." strengthened the peace argument."
Molly Rush, a member of the Daily staff writer Andy Mead
Plowshares 8 and convicted on felony
charges for smashing nuclear filed a report for this story.
OPEN AAUP CHAPTER MEETING
Friday, Nov. 12 at Noon
Michigan Room in Michigan League
Speaker: PROFESSOR VICTOR STONE
(Low, University of Illinois)
National President of AAUP
ON
"Pros and Cons of Collective Bargaining at Universities"
THE PROGRAM WILL BEGIN AT 12:30
Those attending may take lunch trays from the cafeteria to the Michigan
Room on the second floor. The program will begin at 12:30.
- m mmm ----------------------
Please check as appropriate
I wish to receive the AAUP Newsletter and enclose a donation of $
(checks made out to U-M Chapter of AAUP)
I wish to join AAUP. Please send information. Mail to W. Kaplan'
Math., 347 W. Eng.
CALL 995-9107 for AAUP help

Levin backs U.S.
presence in Lebanon

By BILL HANSON
The presence of U.S. Marines in
Beirut is helping to create a unified,
pro-western Lebanon, U.S. Senator
Carl Levin said yesterday.
Levin was in Ann Arbor to address a
convocation on Solutions to the Nuclear
Arms Race at Rackham Auditorium.
Afterward, he spoke to reporters for
several minutes.
"THEY (marines) are performing a
very useful function there," Levin said.
"The risk is worth it."
The senator said the Marines
probably will be in Beirut "quite a
while longer," because their departure
depends on the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon.
Recent estimates indicate there are
8,000 Palestinian Liberation
Organization fighters, 30,000 Syrians,
and some 40,000 to 50,000 Israelis still in
Lebanon. Their removal, Levin said,
will be "very difficult" to achieve.
ONE REPORTER asked Levin what
he thought about a report charging that
the Marines were oppressing
Palestinian civilians in Lebanon.

Daily Photo by SCOTT ZOLTON
Senator Carl Levin (D-Mich.) speaks with reporters at the Rackham
Building after addressing a crowd of 150 people at the Solutions to the
Nuclear Arms Race conference yesterday.

Pausing for a moment, Levin calmly
replied, "I think that's pure bullshit."
American troops have been in Beirut 4
since Spt. 29. Along with French and
Italian troops, they make up the
multinational peacekeeping force
there.
LEVIN WAS not about to miss
yesterday's opportunity to speak out pn
domestic issues, either. He said the
Democratic sweep in last week's elec-
tions "very definitely" affected',ifie
newly proposed Republican jobs bill.
"That message of Nov. 2 got to
Washington with great speed," he
said.
The proposal would focus _On
rebuilding the country's highways,
bridges, dams, and sewage treatment
plants. It is designed to ease 'the
staggering 10.4 percent unemployeidpt
rate by providing up to 200,000 new jobs.
As for 'the future, Levin said he
probably will seek re-election to..$ie
U.S. Senate in 1984, and he's not aftywd
of any battles - not even from e
National Conservative Political ACtZtn
Committee, .famous for going aier
liberal politicans like Levin.
ar survey
help from the University's Institute ,for
Social Research.
Rita Dalton, one of the students
working on the project, said she chose
to do it over an individual survey
"because there seems to be excess'fun-
ds the city has, and they need us to find
out where the funds should be spent."
The students will be surveying
residents of government-assisted
housing about what areas most require
city assistance.
The surveying is scheduled to begin
this week, and probably won't be
finished until next semester, when the
CDD will analyze the data, Ezekiel'
said.
Staff writer Barb Misle filed a
report for this story.

Councilmember 'S class gets city grant f
i f P

(Continuea rom rage i1)
a biased report. "
"I still would have approved it," he
said. "I don't think U of M students will
follow Rafe Ezekiel's line of
reasoning."
Belcher said that although he thinks
Ezekiel will make a fair report, "I'll
probably talk to Rafe and make sure his
instructions are in the best interest of
the city of Ann Arbor."
LESLIE MORRIS (D-Second Ward)
said that, although she had heard
Ezekiel's class was conducting the sur-
E SI I
A ~
EVEC141E SE-IRCH 5 26I C
4( ;C~fix9 5 26
fTAN-('401 T107

vey, she didn't think it was appropriate
to mention it.
"I d on't really think it is supposed to
make any difference (who conducts the
survey)," she said. "It's not totally
proper to include that , in council
debate."
Morris said that because Ezekiel's
role as a councilmember and as a
professor are "totally different . . . it
would have been improper to mix the
two."
THE REPUBLICANS on council
probably would have questioned
Ezekiel's motives, Morris said, ex-
plaining that "that's why I didn't say
anything. Maybe they wouldn't have
understood that it was an ad-
ministrative study."
Councilmembers are especially con-
cerned about bias in the study because
Policy confer
(Continued from Page 1)
treasury secretary to Ford, agreed that
Congress has severly limited the White
House's ability to formulate an effec-
tive foreign policy, but suggested that
the greatest problem was that frequent
U.S. elections take time away from
policy-making.
The major focus for most of today's
politicians, he said, is the "art of win-
ning an election," rather than working

they are split along party lines in the
emphasis they place on certain areas of
human services need.
The Republicans say the city's chief
responsibility is to alleviate immediate
needs and focus on providing money to
hunger and emergency housing
programs.
The Democrats say the city has an
obligation to fund "enabling" projects
such as job training and child care
scholarship programs. Ezekiel said he
was afraid the Republicans would think
his class was conducting the survey to
further Democratic ends.
MEMBERS OF Ezekiel's class said
they chose to do the project instead of
doing individual survey projects. The
students had some input into the
questions asked, Ezekiel said, but most
of the work was done by the CDD with

'ence ends without solutions

on the problems of the nation. The
result, Simon said, is a constant shifting
of gears in both foreign and domestic
policy, creating a shambles of the
nation's economy and crippling
relations with other nations.
The only solution to such problems
would be longer terms for both the
president and members of Congress
with a limit on the number of terms
they could serve, Simon continued.
UNIVERSITY professors Graham
Hovey and John Kingdon, however,
said conflicts between legislative and
executive branches, while sometimes
inefficient, do serve a purpose.
"In general, I have always opposed
attempts by Congress to propose

foreign policy," said Hovey, who is a
former member of The New York
Times' editorial board and is now a
University communications professor. '
The congress does have a role in
U.S. foreign polciy, however, Hovey
said, citing U.S. experiences in Viet-
nam and Angola as examples of the
positive force the legislature can play.
Kingdon agreed for the most part,
asserting the constitutional checks
and balances were "designed to me
usually messy" to ensure no gover-
nmental branch gained too much
power. Both Kingdon and Hovey
suggested better cooperation between
the president and Congress is essential.

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(Continued from Page 1)
As they jockey among themselves for
power, Andropov, Konstantin Cher-
nenko and the others are unlikely to
embark on new international ventures,
in the view of U.S. officials.
In fact, there is a strong hunch here
that the Soviets may be easier to get
along with - at least until one man
emerges as the dominant figure in the
Kremlin.
"As long as the Soviet government is in
a transition period, it's unlikely to take
any new initiatives, either of a positive
or a negative kind," a top ad-
ministration official noted recently.
Another said the Soviets might have

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been tempted in the late 1970'4}o
challenge the United States by moyig
into Iran or into Southeast Asia. "You
could have made a very strong
argument that we were getting closer toO
war," he said.
But now, he said, "if the central issue
in our relationship is whether we are
getting closer to or further away from
war, then I would say we are getting
further away from war."
Calm prevailed in the Soviet capital
yesterday as authorities projected an
image of unity and order. The official
announcement of Brezhnev's death
referred three times to the party's
"collective" will and guidance and once
to the "unshakable unity of the party."
"The domestic and foreign policy of
the Communist Party, formulated un-
der the leadership of Leonid I.
Brezhnev, will continue to be pursued
consistently and purposefully," the an-
nouncement said.

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