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November 12, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Brezhnev's death will
have no drastic effect

The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 12, 1982-Pag

(Continued from Page 1)
we'd be in a holding pattern," said
Rusk, who was President Johnson's
secretary of state when Brezhnev came
to power in the last major transition in
the Soviet government.
Haig, who resigned from the Reagan
administration only six months ago
said all the United States can do in the
next few days is wait and watch. "We
must merely conduct our policies as
usual," he said, emphasizing the United
States could have no effect on the selec-
tion of Brezhnev's successor.
THE SOVIET leaders that do emerge
are likely to be only transitional figures
themselves, according to Brzezinski,
though the former President Carter
aide added the transition should not
deter the United States from initiating
new foreign policies. President Reagan
should give the new leaders "something
constructive to chew on," he said,
suggesting new arms control policies.
"I believe that in arms control we
could make some intermediate
proposals designed to break the
logjam," Brzezinski said.
University political science Prof. J.
David Singer agreed, though he
wouldn't wait until the new leaders
assume power. "The U.S. has to take
some initiatives," he said. The hardline
stance of the United States has
narrowed the field of Brezhnev's suc-
cessors, he said. "All of them have to be
fairly hawkish" to respond to the
rhetoric of the Reagan administration,
he added.
SINGER explained that a hardline
U.S. position only begets the same in-
transigence in the Soviet Union, and
that policy will carry over to future
leaders.
As in past instances of leadership
change, a group will probably emerge

to form a collective leadership, Singer
said.
Raymond Taras, a professor in the
University's Center for East European
and Russian Studies, agreed. Taras
predicted Brezhnev's death would have
no immediate effects on U.S.-Soviet
relations. He did, however, suggest that
the death leaves a "political vacuum"
that will be tough to fill.
"THERE'S A tendency to adopt a
holding pattern and work out a 'modus
vivendi' for a short time," he said.
Taras said long-term trends in Soviet
policy are difficult to predict, but he
suggested there may be some "de-
Brezhnevizing" of the nation's political
structure that might bring younger
members into leadership positions and
liberalize the economy somewhat, but
the changes probably will not be major.
"There's also considerable commit-
ment to detente among the current
leadership," he said.
Political Science Prof. Alfred Meyer
said the debate over who will succeed
Brezhnev is a waste of time. "What we
should try to find out are the problems
the Soviet Union faces. Within 10 years
they (the current leadership, whose
average age is 70) all will be gone."
Meyer also agreed with Singer that
the United States has nothing togain
from belligerency."If we make it tough
for them, they will only make it tough
for ourselves. But they don't want
trouble with the U.S.,"he said.

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Daily Photo by MARY CASSARD
Poet Carolyn Forche speaks on her two-year trip to El Salvador. Forche's
week long stay was part of the University's new Writers in Residence Program.
El Salvador poems
are Forsche's forte

By GEORGEA KOVANIS
When Carolyn Forche writes,
people listen. Especially when her
poems focus on El Salvador, where
American involvement in a civil war
has generated great controversy.-
Forche, the first of three authors to
participate in the University's new
Writers in Residence Program, will
end her week-long stay here today.
A two-year trip to El Salvador, she
stressed during her stay, has changed
the major focus of her works from
that of growing up in Michigan to the
complexities of a Central American
revolution.
THROUGHOUT her trip to Central
America, which ended in 1980, she
worked as a freelance journalist and
"began what was an education for me
in El Salvador." During that time she
also discovered that the media were
not at all interested in El Salvador.
After studying at Justin Morril, an
international relations college at
Michigan State University and doing
research in Ann Arbor on the labor
movement, Forche began working for
Amnesty International and finally
met up with Claribel Alegria, a
Salvadoran poet. Forche lived with
her in 1977 while translating Alegria's
works into English.
This was the beginning of what For-
che called an education which
changed her life.
SHE WAS persuaded by Alegria's
brother to go to El Salvador in 1978.

She accepted the offer and for two
years lived in El Salvador with an
element of danger that she often finds
difficult to talk about. ,
Forche said that she was "very,
seldom in more danger than anyone
else." but she added that it was
dangerous for anyone to document the
progress on human rights.
She said she had to come to terms
with the fact that she might die there.
"I prefer not to say too much about
it," she said. However, she does
describe what she believes was a
close call with a Salvadoran "Death
Squad."
SHE SAID that in March, 1980, she
was walking with a Salvadoran
dissident down a street in the coun-
try's capital of San Salvador. While
walking, the two noticed that gunmen
were training machine guns on them.
She said that there was no way of
knowing whether the gunmen inten-
ded to kill her or the dissident. But,
she added "it was a fluke that we
escaped.".
Forche left San Salvador within a
week of the incident. "If the 'death
squad' wants to kill you and you stay
in the country, they kill you," she
said.
FORCHE SAID she would like the
U.S. government to end all military
aid to the Salvadoran regime and
make a "severe reduction" in
economic aid.

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E-Systems continues
the tradition of
the world's great problem solvers.

Center may get $250,000
(continued from Page 1)

center does not yet have the space or
the organization to use it.
In 1981, the University's molecular
biology faculty was awarded $750,000
over a five-year period from the Thu-
rnau Trust, which has gone to support
graduate students, post-doctoral
researchers, and a search for two new
professors. Next week, the R.eigents

will be asked to put that money under
the control of the center.
OXENDER said an international
search for a permanent director will
begin if the Regents approve the center
next week.
Currently, University researchers in
14 departments receive about $8 million
a year for molecular genetics research.

Unquestionably, Leonardo
da Vinci possessed one of the
world's great minds. Not only re-
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exceptional talents to the me-
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That's only a small seg-
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