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November 12, 1982 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-12

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L.S.A. STUDENT GOVERNMENT ELECTION
VOTE

Page 2-Friday, November 12, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Independent candlidate
runs on uniqua"ate
run an u u sl 688A

November 15
Union 10:00 am-2:09 pm
UGLI 7:00 pm-10:00 pm
Fisbowl 8:S am-3:15 pm
Mosher Jordan 4:00 pm-6:00 pm
Alice Lloyd 4:15 pm-6:15 pm
Couzens 4:30 pm-6:45 pm
Markley 4:45 pm-6:45 pm~

November 16
Union 10:00 am-3:00 pm
UGLI 3:30 pm-7:00 pm
Fishbowl 8:45 am-8:00 pm
East Quad 4:00 pm-6:00 pm
South Quad 4:15 pm-6:15 pm
West Quad 4:30 pm-6:45 pm
pursiey 4:45 pm-8;45 pm

Have a say in your Student Government and

vote for fifteen candidates-at-large,
a Vice-President, and a President!
L.S.A.S.G. 4003 Michigan Union

763-4799'

tU
r r Receive a FREE
Pass for two to
"PERSONALS"
the new movie at
:o "the Ann Arbor Theatre
just by placing a personal ad
in the Daily Classifieds.
Good till Fri., Nov. 12
call 764-0557 or come to the Daily at 420 Maynard St.
Live for God and His People as a ...
l
Capuchin
a what?
Capuchin Franciscans are a religious
fraternity of men trying to live the Gospel in
the Spirit of Francis of Assisi in today's
world.
Join us in promoting peace, education,
and justice-- in ghettoes... in jails... in
soup kitchens... in parishes... in halfway
houses... on radio and TV.
Join us in working with and for the
advancement of blacks, whites, Hispanics,
native Americans and people of the Third
World in Central America.
Check out whether being a Capuchin,
committed to living for God and his people,
in the spirit of Francis, is for you. No
obligation. Write today for more
- information.
Clip and Mail Today!..-.....-.............
Father John Holly, OFM Capuchin, 1820 Mt. Elliott Avenue,
Detroit, MI 48207
Yes, send me information about the Capuchin way of life.
Name Age
College Add ress
City State Zip

By ROB FRANK
Michael Jones, presidential can-
didate for the LSA Student Gover-
nment, is giving the word "slate" a new
meaning. Instead of the standard
smattering of hopefuls for various of-
fices, Jones' Independent Students Par-
ty offers only a presidential and vice-
presidential candidate.
"It became too much of a hassle,"
said Jones, explaining why he hadn't
drawn other students to run for the 15
LSA-SG
Elections
at-large:seats available in the Nov. 14-
15 election.
This year's election, in general, has
been plagued by a lack of student in-
terest. But, according to Jones, run-
ning with vice-presidential candidate
Kathy Bonczak, this problem won't af-
fect LSA-SG's productivity in the
future. "Student government is in a rut
now," he said. "But, I think we're
going to pull out of it."
The independent candidate has more
student government experience than
any of the other presidential candidates
having served on LSA-SG since his
election in September, 1981. "I think
experience has some bearing, but only in
the leadership roles. The other can-
didates might not know the ropes as
well."
ALTHOUGH Jones cites University
budget plans, admissions, and student
input as some of his high priorities, he
says his efforts as president next year
would focus on curriculum.
"It (curriculum) should be looked at

Jones
...curriculum is key
more closely," said the LSA
sophomore. "If you talk abut how
much students are paying, we really
should review what we're learning. We
should see if we really are getting a
liberal arts education.
The presidential hopeful said he also
is concerned about the impression
students have of their student gover-
nment. "There's a really lack of
credibility to LSA-SG. In order to
restore that credibility, we have to start
immediately after the election and go
straight to the students."
JONES ALSO wants to revive the en-
thusiasm of LSA students who have
long displayed apathy toward their
college, he said. "We have to start
right in the grass roots. You don't have
to go any further than your own back
yard (for student support)."

"LAW SCHOOL
CONVERSATIONS"
With
UM Law School Admissions Dean
Allan Stillwagon
Small group discussions on preparation for law school, law
school expectations, how admissions decisions are made, and
how to select a law school.
Time: 9to 12 and 1:30 to 3:30
(Hourly Discussions)
Place: 312 Hutchins Hall
(Law School Admissions Office)
Please sign up for time and date.
Dates: November 16, Tuesday
December 1, Wednesday
January 11, Tuesday

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Walesa to be freed within days
WARSAW, Poland- Interned Solidarity leader Lech Walesa has offered to
help "find a solution" to Poland's problems and will be freed without con-
ditions in a few days, the marital law regime said yesterday.
The announcement came a day after the failure of a general strike called
by underground leaders of the outlawed independent labor union. "If it is
true, I will be happy," Walesa's wife Danuta told The Associated Press by
telephone from the couple's home in the northern port city of Gdansk. "I'm
full of joy and fear, because I cannot imagine the crowds of people who will
want to see him."
Walesa was interned, along with thousands of Solidarity members, after
the imposition of martial law last Dec. 13. The 40-year-old electrician played
a key role in the Aug. 1980 creation of Solidarity, the first free union in the
Soviet bloc.
Social Security system faces
shortage of up to0 $200 billion
ALEXANDRIA, Va.- The National Commission on Social Security
Reform reached quick and unanimous agreement yesterday that the system
faces a shortage of $150 billion to $200 billion over the next seven years.
The 15 members then set about the far more difficult task of trying to
agree on ways to close that gap, either through higher taxes, a slowdown in
the growth of benefits or a combination.
Later, the panel members agreed, again unanimously, to use the Social
Security trustees' intermediate long-term forecast to gauge the size of the
system's deficit over the next 75 years.
That forecast indicates a need for a 15 percent increase in the payroll tax
to close the gap over that longer period.
Economist Alan Greenspan, the chairman, marshalled the members into
accord on the seven-year target figures with little dissent, although some
Republican lawmakers said the deficits could be even worse.
The commission adjourned after putting off a vote on whether to recom-
mend that Social Security be taken out of the unified federal budget. Most
members seemed to favor that move.
Lebanese explosiondestroys
Israeli military headquarters
A Lebanese "kamikaze" car packed with explosives slammed into an
Israeli military headquarters in Lebanon's southern city of Tyre yesterday,
killing and wounding scores of Israeli soldiers and Palestinian prisoners.
Israeli soldiers at the scene of the suicide attack, believed to be the single
most deadly attack against Israeli forces since they invaded Lebanon June
6, said as many as 200 people were killed or wounded.
The force of the blast collapsed the six-story building in the former
Palestine Liberation Organization stronghold on Lebanon's southern coast.
In a message to Beirut's independent An Nahar newspaper, the previously
unknown Armed Struggle Organization claimed responsibility for the bom-
bing.
"The sole efficient way to get the cancerous microbe, Israel, out of our
nation, is armed struggle," the message said.
Habib to return to Middle East
WASHINGTON - President Reagan said yesterday he is sending Am-
bassador Philip Habib back to the Middle East to negotiate the withdrawal
of foreign forces from Lebanon and seek an overall peace in the region.
Habib, who will leave later this month, will take over negotiating duties
from U.S. ambassadors Morris Draper and Richard Fairbanks. Reagan,
posing with Habib for photographers, was asked why Habib was being tap-
ped again. The president replied, "Let's just say it's always worked better
when he's there."
Speaking later with reporters, Habib, 62, said his goal was for withdrawal
of all foreign forces from Lebanon by the end of the year. He said he would
pursue both objectives - the withdrawal and Mideast peace - simultaneously.
"Don't think we can't succeed," Habib told reporters. He denied that
Reagan's peace plan is in trouble, but acknowledged that "there are
problems."
Reagan stresses global peace
President Reagan said yesterday Russia and the United States bear "a
tremendous burden" to work for world peace following the death of Soviet
leader Leonid Brezhnev, but warned "peace is a product of strength, not of
weakness."
At the start of a nationally broadcast news conference, Reagan pledged to
continue to work toward global peace, but said while "we remain hopeful for
better relations," the United States "is determined to remain a free people."

In other news conference items, Reagan said: Democratic proposals are
"make-work job programs" which may cost more jobs than are created. He
said in the seven-year period ending in 1981, the government spent $66 billion
on jobs programs such as those being talking about on Capitol Hill.
Vol. XCIII, No. 56
Friday, November 12, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
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