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November 10, 1982 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-10

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Page 10-Wednesday, November 10, 1982-The Michigan Daily

BREWER SHORTSTOP OUTPOINTS MURRAY

Club Sports
SAILING
The Michigan sailing team hosted the Area A
eliminations last weekend on Base Line Lake. The
sailors proved to be less-than-gracious hosts, however,
as they completely dominated the event.
Michigan took first place, seven points in front of
second-place Notre Dame. The other five teams were
never in contention for top honors.
"It was an excellent regatta for us," said team captain
Doug Wefer. "We were able to dominate the regatta,
using our third- and fourth-string crews."
Michigan boats took the top spots in both the A and B
division races. The A boat had a crew of Dave Watt
(skipper), Dianna Lowry, and Adam Rosen. The B crew
consisted of Greg Danalich and Beth Borton.
The victory qualified Michigan for the Timmie
Angstan Regatta on Thanksgiving weekend at the
Chicago Yacht Club. Cleveland State and Notre Dame
also qualified.
SOCCER
How often does a goalie score the winning goal in a
soccer match? Not very often, but it happened in the
Graduate Soccer Club's 2-1 victory over Siena Heights
College.
Jay Weiss, who is normally the team's first-string
goalie, was forced into front-line action because most of
the starters were not available for the contest.
The Wolverines nabbed an early lead when Paul
Knight took a free-kick and chipped it over the defensive
wall and into the net. Knight also had the assist on the
game-winning goal.t
Shortly after the first goal, the game was interrupted
by a fight. After order had been restored, Siena Heights

Roundup
knotted the game with 15 minutes left to play in the first
half. Weiss' game breaker came with 15 minutes
remaining in the contest.
"It was a wild game," said Captain Mike Backfield.
"It was very physical out there. You know it's a strange
game when your goalie gets the winning score and one of
your players was playing his first game with the team."
Saturday's victory was the graduate club's last game
of the season.
The undergraduate soccer club raised their season
mark to 8-5 last Wednesday by defeating the Grand Cup
Club 2-1.
The Wolverines scored once in each half and con-
trolled the contest from the beginning. Scoring for
Michigan were Tom Park and Fatih Tezok.
Grand Cups goal came late in the game when the out-
come was no longer in doubt and Michigan had already
put in their second and third stringers.
Two weeks ago, the team dropped a match to Spring
Arbor College by a 1-0 count. Spring Arbor is ranked six-
th in the National Association of Inter-collegiate
Athletics poll.
"We played our hearts out against Spring A rbor,"
said captain Eric Freeburg, 'and it was a real tough loss.
After that game, the club's moral has been really low. A
lot of people have lost their enthusiasm and it was hard
- to get up for our remaining games.
The women's soccer club came back from a 1-0 deficit
to defeat Ohio State 2-1 in Columbus.
Goalie Carolyn Barns made some outstanding saves to
preserve the'victory.
The Club Sports Roundup relates briefly the ac-
tivities of Michigan club sports during the previous
week. This week's information was compiled by
Daily sports writer Dan Price.

Milwaukee's Yount named MVP

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BILLBOARD
There will be a pep rally Friday night
at the Beta Theta Pi fraternity for
Saturday's Michigan Purdue football
game. The rally, which begins at 7:30
p.m., is sponsored by the Martha Cook
Student Organization, Beta Theta'Pi,
and the University Activities Center.
Head coach Bo Schembechler, tri-
captains Anthony Carter, Robert
Thompson, and Paul Girgash are ex-
pected to speak.

NEW YORK (API - Robin Yount of
the Milwaukee Brewers, who capped
his finest season by setting one World
Series record and equalling another,
was named Most Valuable Player of the
American League by a large margin
yesterday.
Yount, a 27-year-old shortstop,
received 385 points in balloting by a
special panel of 28 members of the
Baseball Writers Association of
America, two from each AL city. Eddie
Murray of the Baltimore Orioles was
second in balloting with 228 points.
YOUNT received all but one first-
place vote. The other went to Reggie
Jackson of the California Angels, who
GRIDDE PICKS
Did you ever wonder how Griddes got
started? I knew you did. Once upon a
time in a land far, far away, was a man
who made pizzas. This man's name was
Bob. It seems that this Bob made such
incredibly good pizzas that everyone in
the small village in which he lived wan,
ted some. Every day. Every day for
every meal.
But since this was such a small town,
Bob's ambitions outgrew his clientele,
and so he moved to the land of the
world's best beer drinkers - Ann Ar-
bor. Bob rightly figured that students
who drank so much beer needed
something to soak up all those good
suds - so he opened Pizza Bob's. And
he needed a gimmick to set him apart
from all those other pizza places, so he
got in contact with those folks at the
Michigan Daily and the Griddes com-
petition was started. Besides, Bob had
never won any competitions, and he
figured he ought to be able to win a com-
petition that he was sponsoring. But he
never has. Show up Pizza Bob by
bringing your picks to the Daily offices
before midnight Friday for your chance
at taking one more small one-item piza
from the paws of big Bob.
1. Purdue at MICHIGAN
2. Ohio State at Northwestern
3. Illinois at Indiana
4. Minnesota at Michigan State
5. Wisconsin at Iowa
6. Georgia at Auburn
7. Penn State at Notre Dame
8. Washington at Arizona State
9. Clemson at Maryland
10. Missouri at Oklahoma
11. Stanford at UCLA
12. Virginia at North Carolina
13. Tulsa at New Mexico State
14. USC at Arizona
15. San Diego at Brigham Young
16. Mankato State at Nebraska-Omaha
17. North Dakota State at St. Cloud
18. Kutztown State at Layfayette
19. California State at Slippery Rock
20. Purdue Bowl Express at
DAILY LIBELS

finished sixth in balloting with 107 poin-
ts. Third in the vote was Doug DeCinces
of the Angels with 178 points, followed
by Hal McRae of Kansas City with 175,
Cecil Cooper of the Brewers with 152
and Jackson.
In all, 33 players received mention
on the ballot on which panel members
were asked to vote for 10 players. Each
first-place vote was worth 14 points,
second place was worth nine points and
on down the line to one point for 10th
place.
.In 1982, Yount coupled an improved
offense with his most consistent season
in the field to reach beyond the poten-
tial that even his boosters had forecast
when he broke into the major leagues in

1974, at age 18.
BEFORE. THIS year, Yount's best
season had been 1980 when he set
career marks with a .293 average, 23
homers and 87 RBI. But he eclipsed
that season in 1982 with a batting
averae of .331, one point behind league
leader Willie Wilson of Kansas City,
who sat out the final game of the season
to preserve his .332 average.
Yount, whose bat cooled off during
the American League playoff against
California, was outstanding as the
Brewers met St. Louis in the World
Series. He hit .414 with one homer and 4
shared the team lead in RBI with
Cooper by driving in six runs.

in automotive parts

YPSILANTI

Off the Record
By BOB WOJNO WSKI
Last word on the Illini .. .
.in a 'no-class' by themselves
T HERE HAS BEEN perhaps too much and then again not enough said
about the circumstances surrounding Michigan's 16-10 victory over
Illinois last Saturday. More directly, too much has been said about the antics
of the Illini and not enough has been said about the relative classlessness of
those antics.
First, some background. Last year, Michigan defeated Illinois, 70-21, and
many felt that Wolverine head coach Bo Schembechler had run up the score
on the Illini. Observers reasoned that Bo harbored ill feelings toward the
Illinois organization because of its wholesale recruitment of junior college
players, its firing of Schembechler protege Gary Moeller, and the manner in
which the Illini handled the Dave Wilson situation two years ago when the
Big Ten declared Wilson, a junior college transfer, ineligible.
Since that game a year ago, the Illinois coaching staff did little to temper
the fans' cries for revenge and instead seized the opportunity to build a
bloodbath rivalry with Michigan. Illinois head coach Mike White will deny
that until he's maize and blue in the face but, after all, who authorized the
word "Payback" to be flashed on the Memorial Stadium scoreboard
throughout a week of practices? Who allowed a Wolverine football helmet to
be filled with a vile-smelling substance and hung inside the Illinois locker
room?
When some of White's players, notably receiver Oliver Williams, spouted
off about how the Illini would run up the score on Michigan this year, where
was the coach to stifle them?
It is very easy and perhaps desirable to dismiss the antics that Illinois
engaged in prior to and during the game to fever-pitch emotional flames that
had been fanned by inflammatory media coverage. But it would be more ac-
curate to attribute the behavior to an Illinois team that suddenly this season
became a prominent member of the Big Ten and got caught up in how
prominent it would become.
I do not wish to absolve Michigan of any wrong-doing, but clearly the
Wolverines and the Illini engage in different forms of emotional hype when
preparing for and then participating in a big game. And those differences
can be traced to, and in fact are a reflection of, the varying personalities of
the two coaches.
Bo is arrogant. He is also stubborn. He is often belligerent. Some of his
play-calling skills can be questioned. But a Schembechler-coached team has
never, and would never, engage in the type of low-budget, no-class, and just
plain stupid hijinks that the Fighting Illini engaged in prior to, during, and
after last Saturday's game.
White, who coaches and presumably leads the Illini, has never been ac-
cused of being a stern disciplinarian. Nobody calls White arrogant. Nobody
says he's particularly stubborn. Nobody says the Illinois football team has
any class either.
Two games at once
I sat in the press box in Champaign and, when not mesmerized by the
game being played on the field, was amused by the game being played off of
it. It was a rough game-on the field-with a few personal fouls called and a
few more that weren't. Illinois for the afternoon was whistled down for 93
yards worth of penalties, Michigan 40.
When an Illinois player would make an exceptional play, he would make
sure the entire audience knew, usually by jumping and thrusting a fist in the
air. In pigskin jargon, that is known as show-boating.
But the most disgusting display of classlessness occurred on the Illinois
sidelines, where both players and coaches engaged in running conversations
with Michigan players on the field. Almost, every Wolverine player who
spoke after the game said that the observers on the Illinois sideline spent the
entire game yelling at them, indeed even mocking them when they missed a
tackle or blew a block. Mind you, this was not just behavior confined to the
players, but the coaches also. And it was not just an isolated instance;
nobody from either side would deny that it occurred.
Michigan players after the game called it the most hostile atmosphere
they had ever played in. More so than Ohio State, where they know what a
true rivalry is.
The Illinois players, meanwhile, had no tales of verbal abuse to tell. One
guesses that they were not so abused. Instead, they said things like: "When
you think of Michigan you think of great athletes; when you think of Illinois
you think of great coaching." That gem brought to you by quarterback Tony
Eason.
The Michigan football program is far from pristine, but the point here is
that the Illinois program is farther. And using classless methods to build
superficial rivalries will not give the fans in Champaign anything to be proud
of, anytime soon.

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