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November 09, 1982 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-09

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The Michigan Daily

Tuesday, November 9, 1982
Light in the

Page 5

long tunnel

By Ben Ticho
A T-LEMANIA returns to the
States. Ranking Roger leads
the latter-day invasion to Second
Chance as the English Beat take
Ann Arbor by force last Sunday
night.
Throngs scream and scramble
over each other to touch lead singer
Dave Wakeling's outstretched hand.
The guys and girls dance wildly and
sing along on "Twist and Crawl, "
"Mirror in the Bathroom,'" "Jean-
nette, " and all the other ska and
post-ska hits. Temperatures rise and
bubble over as six-feet plus Roger
vaults across the stage. The
collegiate masses have a good time.
Afterwards, group members relax
with a shower and cigarette. Daily
staffers C.E. Krell and Ben Ticho
stop backstage to chat with their
new friends, Wakeling and bassist

David Steele. You're much more in-
terested in hearing what they have to
say, so I'll let Dave and David take
it away:
Daily: Where do you prefer to play?
Bigger halls or ...
David Steele: Less hot places. It's not
a pleasant sensation if you're playing
on stage and you feel like puking up half
the time.
D: Are you doing anything different
on this tour?
S: Yes, we're selling records.
D: What do you think accounts for
that?
S: I don't know-it's probably a bad
sign. Everybody says that once you
start selling records in America most
people say you're doomed in England.
As soon as the Clash started selling
records here, everybody in England
immediately went off them. And the
Police in England are a joke as well.
D: A lot of people say that the Beat
has changed. When you first came out,
it was just praise upon praise upon
praise ... then it seemed (after Wha'p-

pen?, their second album) you made a
bunch of singles that got really ... bad
reviews ...
S: We didn't even like them our-
selves.
D: What happened?
S: I don't know. It's hard even after
you've done one LP; I mean, to us,
playing in a group is about three things
you do-you get on top of the pops, you
do an LP, and maybe you get on the
cover of Smash Hits (England Music
magazine). After that, there's not
really very much more you can do;
you've done a record, you've done a
tour, you've been to France, you've
been on your favorite TV show. . . So we
didn't really know what we wanted to
do.
D: What do you do now?
S: (laughs) Now we do it to make
money. We decided to make it in-
teresting; we just thought we'd try and
break America-when we first started
we didn't really give a fuck about it.
Which is a bit narrow-minded-you do
tend to lump all America as idiots, but
then when we actually came here we
found there were some nice ones. You
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know, say, maybe ten percent.
D: Now that you initial popularity has
waned, what have you got left to say?
S: Nothing. We said all we had to say
in the first LP, so . . . I mean you can
still do interesting things musically,
but lyrically . . . you can only say
something once-you can write a song
about nuclear employment once, you
See RANKING, Page 7

Daily Photo by ELIZABETH SCOTT'
bops to the beat of The English Beat last Sunday night

Tf
BE IN THE
FOREFRONT
OF TODAY'S
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See your ideas ma-
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A great way of Wde

Ranking Roger (left)1
at Second Chance.

F eln' stronger with Chicago
By Mare Hodges

CHICAGO PROVED THAT THEIR
legend lives on Friday evening at
Chrisler Arena in a two-hour show that
included such classics , as "Feelin'
Stronger Everyday," "Saturday in the
Park," "If You Leave Me Now." The
crowd greeted them with enthusiastic
cheers and appaluse that echoed
throughout their entire sixteen-sonmg
performance.
Chicago's newest edition, Bill Cham-
plin, featured on keyboards and
vocals, was warmly welcomed by
Chicago fans young and old as he per-
formed a song from his solo LP
"Satisfaction." Champlin has filled the
spot of the late Terry Kath with special
vocal qualities enhancing many of
Chicago's popular hits.
If it's Chicago's insttumentals that
thrill you then you would have gotten
your fill at Friday's concert. The band
played several, lengthy instrumental
'arrangements .between songs;
featuring a clarine't solo by Walt
Parazaider, a wonderful piano piece by
Robert Larrim, and even a drum solo,
with Danny Seraphine on drums.
Chicago performed a few songs from
their new, highly acclaimed LP, XVI.
These tunes included "Follow Me," an
Vpbeat romance song that had the
audience dancing in their seats, "Love
Me Tomorrow," and "Hard to Say I'm
Sorry." These last two, both top-40 hits
were met with resounding applause and
dancing in the aisles.-

r7
-f
.N . :

... N

FULL

Chicago blares out another winner last Friday at Crisler Arena. Daily Photo by DAVID FRANKEL

SERVICE

PHOTO

LAB

The band performed a jazzy rendition
of everyone's favorite "Does Anybody
Really Know What Time It Is?" sen-
ding the crowd to their feet, where they
stayed for the remainder of the perfor-
mance.
The show was coming to a close as
Chicago played the romantic "Color My
World," and then went back to perform
the tune that they opened with, "Only

the Beginning." Stomping feet and
banging chairs brought the boys back
onstage for two encores, including "I'm
a Man" and an exciting rendition of "So
Glad We Made It," a tune recently
made popular by the Blues Brothers.
For their finale, Chicago played the
Beatles' hit "Got To Get You Into My
Life," turning the arena lights on for

the audience to join in. This tachnique,
popular among various pop-rock artists
these days, got the crowd even more
excited.
Overall, it was an excellent perfor-
mance and from the reaction of the
crowd it seems that Chicago fans are
glad to have this legendary group per-
forming again.

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Holly Near gets even closer

By Tom McDonald
GGY POP couldn't fill up the
Michigan Theatre a week and a half
ago, but Holly Near sure did last Satur-
day night as she had her enthusiastic
fans spilling out into the aisles and on to
the floor. Not a scene to be expected
from a vocalist with such limited ex-
posure, but after a powerful 20-song,
Stwo hour set, I understood why. The
uoyant singer and songwriter, best
kpown for her polished integration of
policies and music, kept the excited and
responsive audience at bay with her
disciplined, Broadway-trained voice, as
she proceeded through various selec-
tions from her ten year, six album
career.
' Holly Near has nothing to hide. She
lays what she has to say on the line.
Perhaps it is her candidness and sin-
cerity in speaking her mind that attrac-
ts such a diverse audience representing
All walks of life including gays, political
activists, social interest groups, liberal
women, old people, and just people who
enjoy her music. Holly attempts to

siphon the human experience out of
society and relay it back through her
music in which she presents the in-
dividual with dignity and respect. She
advocates the maximization of human
potential and creativity to help make a
better society. Despite her strong, out-
spoken views, Holly is .foremost a
singer who is politically and socially ac-
tive and not a political and social ac-
tivist who sings.
In an interview before the show,
Holly voiced some of the liberal views
included in her songs. In regard to the
nuclear movement she said, "It's easy
to destroy the world, we already know
how; the challenge is to figure out how
to preserve and save it." She added,
"People are jeopardizing the planet's
existence by building up nuclear ar-
ms . .. we have to alter how we treat
each other and confront life style im-
pressions that make survival difficult."
Near cites the passage of Proposal E as
a start to a long battle to reach the goal
of nuclear disarmament.
Holly broke down any communication
barriers on the stage as she opened her

set with a crisp rendition of "I Really
Didn't Want To" from her last album,
Speed of Light. Holly's comment,
"We're not talking logic here" speaking
in reference to the "ineptness of world
leaders" provided an introduction to
her anti-nuke snthem, "Family
Promise," which was met with a
dramatic reaction by the crowd. Holly's
able musicians, Nina Glodin and Carrie
Barton appeared tight and well-
rehearsed in providing a solid for-
foundation which worked well within
the range of Miss Near's vocals.

To the delight of many, women's
music is no longer riding the back seat.
Holly Near proved that Saturday as she
instilled feelings of worthwhileness to
an inspired audience. I had a good time
and I didn't even seem to mind all the
ladies in the men's rest room.

r

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 7:30 P.M.
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Film Show and Comments by Dr. Leonard Suransky
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 8 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION, 2nd Floor BALLROOM
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 7:30 D.M.
MICHIGAN UNION, 2nd Floor BALLROOM
A Symposium: "African development-PROBLEMS AND PARADOXES"
Topics and Participants:
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Chris Dede, Engineer, SIRC, Inc.
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Professor Lemuel Johnson
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Professor Teshome Wagow
"AFRICA AND THE WORLD ECONOMY"
Professor Ernest Wilson
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