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September 09, 1982 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



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Page 2-E-Thursday, September 9, 1982-The Michigan Daily

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, SeF

Art from all over in Ann Arbor

Video fever in A

By Jill Beiswenger
Art is an index of civilization, a way
to communicate beyond national and
regional boundaries, and a reflection of
culture in its fundamental forms.
If you agree with all of that, you'll
find justification for your beliefs quite
easily in Ann Arbor. The variety of art
on exhibit in Ann Arbor's galleries and
museums is remarkable. This includes
just about any medium you fancy and
represents nearly every corner of the
globe.
And believe it or not, gallery owners
actually like it when you browse and
ask questions.
FINE AR TS
Alice Simsar Gallery, 301 N. Main.
This gallery features contemporary
prints, sculptures and paintings,
primarily of East and West Coast ar-
tists. Often these are works of well
known artists with international
reputations.
DeGraff-Forsythe Galleries, 201
Nickels Arcade.
Major pieces by American and inter-
nationally known artists are on exhibit
here. There are oil and acrylic pain-
tings, sculpture, and sometimes
tapestries. The owners feature some
Native American works and also
specialize in Latin American artists.
Phoenix Gallery, 225 S. Ashley.
This gallery places its emphasis on
smaller pieces, mostly paintings, sculp-
ture, drawings, and prints of local and
regional artists. The owner is looking
toward expanding the selection from
artists farther afield in the future.

(Continued from Page 22)
their favorite high tech game, the
Union is planning to install a complete
arcade room on the ground floor as part
of its renovation program.
David Mitchell-Yellin, the recreation
coordinator for the Union, said that the
arcade will probably have 25 to 30
machines, which would be "a mix of
pinball and video games."
"We'll have mostly video,".said Mit-
chell-Yellin, "but there are still a lot of
pinball addicts."
Most students who try out different
places recognize the advantage and-
disadvantages of the arcades.
"Smugs has better deals, but the
Union has a better Destroyers
machine," said Steve Markevich, a
senior in the business school.
The arcades, however, are not the
only place to gorge yourself on your
favorite computerized fare.
All of the dorms have at least a few
video games on which to fritter away
the hours when you should be studying.
Lines can be a problem at some of the

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Daily Photo by-JACKIE BELL
THE UNIVERSITY'S Museum of Art hosted a special exhibit of art works by Leonardo da Vinci this summer. The -
museum's regular collection includes pieces by artists of many styles and eras, including works by Claude Monet;
James McNeill Whistler, and Andy Warhol.

PHOTOGRAPHY
Blixt Gallery, 229 Nickels Arcade.
The work of artists like Imogene
Cunningham and Andre Kertecz is
shown here, along with many other
equally talented, but lesser known ar-
tists, making for a great variety. The

gallery also sells books of photography
and frameable posters.
FOLK ART
Lotus Gallery, 617 E. Huron.
As the name implies, the selection of
this gallery is primarily Oriental:

Korean, Chinese, and Japanese. There
are paintings, prints, ceramics, and
jade and bronze from the Orient. But
Lotus also features antique pottery and
basketry from the Hopi Indians of the
southwestern United States.
See ANN, Page 15

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Unliversi ylfvities cne
The largest student--run programming
department on campus...

Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
THE HYPNOTIC GLOW of the Astro Fighter video game lures many an
unwilling student into relieving himself of another quarter.

Escape your studies:
Visit a museum

525 E. Liberty St.

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By Greg Brusstar
Several museums on campus offer
culture to the discriminating Univer-
sity student. Taking time away from,
the books and spending it at a museum
can provide a satisfying afternoon.
The Museum of Art is one of the main

attractions on campus. It is located at
the corner of State and South Univer-
sity Streets. On the first floor are oil
paintings by Italian, Spanish, Dutch,
and Flemish painters of the 15th cen-
tury and later. Also on display are
works of American art, which include
a 19th century painting by Eastman
See VISIT, Page 19

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-.009

THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE
IN THE HEART OF THE CAMPUS
(across from Hill Auditorium, Burton Tower & MLB)
When you're newly arrived in A.A.,
Graduation's a long way away-
But that jubilant June
Will be here much too soon
Once you're used to the League every day.
M.B.
Send your League limerick to:
Manager, Michigan League
911 N. University
You will receive 2 free dinner tickets if your
limerick is published.
The Little League Coffee Shop
Lower level-open
Mon-Fri 7:15-4:00
Sat 7:15-l:00am
Cafeteria-open
Mon-Sat I l:30am-1:15pm
y 5:00pm-7:15pm
Sun ll:30am-2:15pmf

featuring

---
w ,', I
THE MICHIGAN L
Staff exten ds a warm we
to new - students
Your place to:
Meet friends for breakfast, lui
snack in-The Little League
Relax in our garden
Treat yourself to our delicious
special dinner in the cafeteria
Study in the Library and 3rd f
Pick up the latest paperbacks,
souvenirs and supplies at the n

" Fresh Salads

" Steakburgers, deli &
vegetarian sandwiches
* Homemade Soups
(Including Clam
Chowder)

* Baked Potatoes
Extraordinaire
* Pizza
" Full Course Meals
" Daily Happy Hour
4-6:00 p.m.
'/ 'RICE PIZZA

Being student-run we not only provide student-
oriented activities but also the opportunity
for you to do the programming!
We're open weekdays 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
at 2105 Michigan Union (second floor).
Stop by or give us a call at 763-1107.
Also,watch for the mass meeting in the fall!

Try our'MUSIC & MEAL DEAL!
Eat-in 'bur restaurant and receive free admW
s#on to the Second Chance. Sun.-Thurs.

iI

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