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November 05, 1982 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-05

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 5, 1982-Page 3

Barnard turns down
invitation to speak

The Liddy-Lea
comes to Ann A

By LAURIE DELATER
Responding to the objections ex-
pressed by Eastern Michigan University
faculty, staff, and students, Christian
Barnard, the renowned South African
heart surgeon, has turned down an in-
vitation to give EMU's commencement
address next month.
SThose protesting Barnard's invitation
dobjected to the procedure used in
the selection process as well as Bar-
nard's political and educational
background, which left many doubting
his commitment to full black political
rights, according to Ronald Woods,
director of Afro-American studies at
EMU.
LAST SPRING, EMU president John
Porter invited' the pioneering heart
*urgeon to speak at commencement,
citing Barnard's fame and the fact that
his wife is an EMU alumnus.
September's official announcement
of the selection met with strong protests
from the EMU community, according to
spokeswoman Kathleen Tinney.
After unscheduled appearances by
protesters at a Regent's meeting two
weeks ago, Porter informed Barnard of
possible consequences if he appeared.

BARNARD SAID in a telegram to the
college, "Although my conscience is
perfectly clear and in both my spoken
word and writings, I have been one of
the greatest critics of apartheid, I feel
that under these circumstances I have
to decline." '
Student body President Jerry Curtis
said the telegram "wasn't unexpec-
ted." He said Barnard's decision to
cancel his invitation is probably the
best thing for EMU and its students
because of the uproar that probably
would have resulted at the commen-
cement ceremonies if Barnard had
come.
Woods said the Black Faculty and
Staff Association views the retraction
as a natural consequence of the univer-
sity's ill-adivsed selection procedure.
THE TELEGRAM, he said, has
resolved only one aspect of the issue-
whether or not Barnard will come to the
University. The problem of how to
prevent future ill-advised selections
remains unsolved, Woods said.
Porter said he has appointed a panel
to review the current selection
procedure and determine if another
step in the process is needed.
Porter said he has not yet decided
who will take Barnard's place as this
December's commencement speaker.

By NEIL CHASE
With one urging the overthrow of the
present establishment and the other
vowing to defend the country with his
life, a former drug culture guru and a
Watergate mastermind brought their
traveling debate show to town last
night.
The audience was alternately
delighted and frightened by the ideas
flowing from the stage, and both
Timothy Leary and G. Gordon Liddy
seemed to delight in their effect on the
nearly 1,000 people gathered in the
Michigan Theatre.
SPEAKING as a person who has
studied, enforced, argued, and broken
the law, Liddy, a convicted Watergate
burglar, said he had strong ideas about
the value of the law.
"Law and morality are two entirely
different things," he said. "Morality
comes from the individual nature of
man; law from his social nature."
Liddy distinguished between the two
crimes for which he has been tried,
saying the break-in at Dr. Daniel
Ellsberg's California office was a mat-
ter of national security. "I would have.

performed that entry for any president
of the United States," regardless of his
party, he said.
"THE WATERGATE entry was
purely a political intelligence-gathering
operation. That I would do only to ad-
vance the cause of a president with
whose political views I agree," Liddy
said.
Addressing his own crimes, Leary
said, "I'm going to take any drug I
want. If I cause a disturbance in the
state, if I come running naked down the
freeway, then bust my ass."
Revising his 1960s battle cry, Leary
encouraged the baby-boomers to "turn
on, tune in, and please hurry up and
take over. Then elections will mean
something."
Regarding the most recent election,
Leary said, "It doesn't matter. the
Democrats are just mongoloid
bunglers," he said, calling the

ry act
rbor
Republicans "mongoloid gangsters"
and "nasty militarists." Elections will
be better in the future, he said, when
the adults from the baby boom cause a
"bloodless, humorous revolution."
FOLLOWING the usual format for
their appearances together, the debate
opened with the story of the first time
the two men met "We don't agree on
anything," Liddy said. "We don't
agree on how we came to meet."
Leary, who sporting a sweater and
tennis shoes, contrasted with Liddy's
jacket and tie, said Liddy had broken
into Leary's bedroom to arrest him on a
drug charge in 1966. Liddy was then a
district attorney for Duchess County,
N.Y.
THE MODERATOR, WUOM's Fred
Hindley, pointed out as the debate
opened, that many students in the
See LIDDY, Page 6

Barnard

. . declines invitation

I

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ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
GRADUATE STUDY IN SOCIAL WORK
AT
WURZWEILER SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
several programs leading to the
Master of Social Work degree (M.S.W.)
Residency in New York City or in any city in North America.
Field placements also available in Israel.
MEET WITH PROF. BEN MAYER ON THURS., NOV. 18, 2-5 pm
AT HILLEL, 1429 Hill Street
APPOINTMENTS SHOULD BE MADE THROUGH THE HILLEL OFFICE
663-3336

P I
Highlight
Chicago will be performing this evening at 7:30 p.m., in Crisler Arena.
Tickets for the performance are still available. For more information, call
763-2071.
Films
Committee for Gender Research-Cave People of the Philippines, 12 p.m.,
International Center, 603 E. Madison.
Ann Arbor Film Coop-Fellini's Casanova, 6:30 and 9:15 p.m., MLB 4.
Cinema Guild-Cries and Whispers, 7 & 9:00 p.m., Lorch.
Cinema II-Passe Ton Bac D'Abord, 7 & 9:35 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. A.
Cinema I-Experimental Films, 8:30 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. A.
Classic Film Theatre-Fritz the Cat, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m., Michigan
Theatre.
Classic Film Theatre-Heavy Traffic, 6,9 & 12 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Mediatrics-Dragonslayer, 7 & 9:00 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Polish-American Student Association-Workers '80, 8 p.m., 2302 School of
Education.
Performance Network-San Francisco International Video Festival, 8:00
p.m., 408 W. Washington.
Performances
Saline Area Players-Arsenic and Old Lace, 8:00 p.m., Saline High School
Auditorium.
Department of Theatre and Drama-The Amen Corner by James Bald-
win, 8:00 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn.
Ark-Peter Madcat Ruth, harmonica virtuoso, 8:30 p.m., 1421 Hill St.
School of Music-Opera, "The Rake's Progress," 8:00 p.m., Power Cen-
ter.
Ars Musica-Tribute to Haydn Concert, 8:30 p.m., St. Andrew's Episcopal
Church, 306 N. Division.
Speakers
Union of Students for Israel-Jonathan Kessler, "The Current State of
United States-Israel Relations: A Washington Update," 7:30 p.m., Hillel.
Anthropology Department-Thomas Moylan, "On Reviving the Notion of
Tribe: Some Linguistic Evidence for Social Groups in New Guinea," 4:00
p.m., 2003 Angell Hall.
Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies-Vira Sachakul, "Bangkok
Shop Houses: Socio-Economic Analysis and Strategies for Improvement,"
12 p.m., Lane Hall Commons Room.
Guild House-Len Suransky, "The Prospect of Returning to Southern
Africa," 12 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Museum of Art-Barbara Hamel, "High Spirits & Mystery," 12:10-12:30
p.m., Stella Exhibition.
Transportation Studies-Jerome Rudnick, "Impact of Deregulation on In-
tracity Bus Service," 2-5:00 p.m., Henderson Rm., League.
Near East and North African Studies-Maya Tavori, "Consumer Protec-
tion Agency as Consumer Advocate in Israel," 2:00 p.m., B137 MLB.
Artists and Craftsmen Guild-Terri Marra, "Programs and Opportunities
Available to Students and Staff at the Guild," I.B. Remsen, "Share Ex-
periences as a Working and Exhibiting Artist in Ann Arbor," 12:30-1:30 p.m.,
Second Floor, School of Art Auditorium.
Meetings
Human Sexuality-Gay Coffee Hour, 5-6:30 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
Tae Kwon Do Club-Practice, 5-7:00 p.m., Martial Arts Room, CCRB.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class-English, Mandarin, and Cantonese
groups, 7:30 p.m., Univ. Reformed Church.
International Student Fellowship-Meeting, 7:00 p.m., 4100 Dixon Road.
Open to all foreign students.
University Duplicate Bridge Club-7:15 p.m., League.
Folk Dance Club-8:00-midnight, Dance Studio, corner of State and
'William, Third floor.
Miscellaneous
Alpha Phi Omega-Blood Drive, 11:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Markley.
Hockey-Michigan vs. Michigan State, 7:30 p.m., Yost Ice Arena.
Astrofest 117-"Spacesounds," 7:30 p.m., MLB Aud. 3.
Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library-Book Sale, 5:30-9:00 p.m., Ann
Arbor Public Library, corner of Fifth and William.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
A University Players Showcase F;,F' oIan
A THE

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