100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1982 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6

.

Lifestyle programs tei
JFlCnss. buildhealthier mins

By LISA NOFERI
If you are interested in something for
nothing, or nothing that is anything but
fun, then consider the Adult Lifestyle
Program at the CCRB.
You can benefit your body and your
GPA by joining one of the many exer-
cise classes, according -to the coor-
dinator of the program, Phyllis
Weikart.
"ACTIVITY should be considered an
essential part of everyday life, par-
ticularly for students who often feel too
pressured by the demands of
academics to allow time for a regular
exercise program," Weikart said.
Adapting an exercise routine to one's
lifestyle will lead to, increased in-
dividual productivity.
"We are here to impart to students a
knowledge of the proper steps toward
exercise and we hope that what they
learn will continue into post-collegiate
years," stressed Weikart. "The pur-
pose is to develop a healthy faculty,
staff, and student body through the
facilities and current information that
Michigan, as a world-class research in-
stitution, can provide."
IT IS NOW widely recognized that
expended energy creates more energy
which is a valuable resource for the
late-night schedules of most college
students.
"Practicing everyday definitely im-
proves my concentration and perfor-
mance levels for academics," said All-
American tennis player Marian
Kremer, who also was on the
academic Honor Roll. "
The Lifestyle program is designed to
meet the physical, as well as
psychological needs of the University's
population.
AS OF 1979, the program was opened
to non-students also in order to provide
a "social networking" of students and
adults in the community, which is often

lacking in the restricted sphere of cam-
pus life.
"It is important for students not to
isolate themselves within their school
environment," Weikart believes. "The

classes per week in such areas as
swimming, weight-lifting, karate,
volleyball, and gymnastics.
WEIKART explains the purpose of
instituting a variety of similar exercise

'Activity should be considered an essential
part of everyday life, particularly for
students who often feel too pressured by the
demands of academics to allow time for a
regular exercise program.'
-Adult Lifestyle Program coordinator
Phyllis Weikart

rch how to
and bodies'
The program coordinator emphasizes
an important element of the program is
its consideration of the self-conscious
non-athlete who may regard the road to
body rejunvenation as too long and tor-
tuous.
"The first few classes are geared to
create a high degree of comfort and
feeling of personal success for each in-
dividual," said Weikard. "We en-
courage personal gain which would be
unattainable in a stressful situation."
SHE IS PROUD of the overall climate
the program has initiated and refers to
popular feedback from students who
claim, "it is the one class I look forward
to and, the only one where the instruc-
tor knows my name."
For a small registration fee, at an
average class size of 20, classes run the
duration of a semester. The course is
graded pass/fail and will appear on
your transcript.
Renewals for CPR, Water Safety In-
struction, and Life Saving certificate
are also available through the
program.
Can your athletic roommate study
until 2:30 a.m. and wake up in time for
an 8:00 a.ui. class, while it takes you
two cups of coffee and a cold shower to
open your eyes for your 10:00? You are
then wasting time and energy and can
overcome both with a course from the
Lifestyle Program. Visit the CCRB or
call 764-2462 for information.

Page 10-Wednesday, November 3, 1982-The Michigan Daily
t It

Club Sports Roundup
Crew
The Rowing Club sent four crews to Boston for the Head of the Charles
race which was held on October 24. This is the largest and most prestigious
head-race in the country, and annually draws over 100,000 people to the
shores of the Charles.
The women's club eight boat took second place in their race, finishing four
seconds behind first place Minnesota. The boat was coxswained by Lisa
Phillipsborn.
The men's lightweight eight boat suffered a major blow when they were hit
from behind by Wesleyan. This collision added 10 to 15 seconds to their time
and dropped them at least 10 places. The boat eventually finished 29th.
The other two Michigan boats, women's club four and men's youth four,
finished ninth and 29th respectively.
Sailing
Scott Ferguson and Doug Wefer represented the Michigan Sailing team in
the National Singlehand Championships last weekend on Lake Minnetonka
in Minnesota.
This race featured the top 15 skippers from all over the country, and is
considered the national championship for collegiate sailing.
Ferguson took sixth place, and would have finished higher if the wind had
not died on the second day of competition. Ferguson was second after the fir-
st day, but when the wind slowed he was not able to use his 185-pound frame
to his advantage.
The team also sent members to Boston for the Boston Shell Trophy Regat-
ta. Michigan took fourth behind Navy, Harvard, and Boston University.
Next week the sailors will be in Charleston, S.C. for the National Sloop
Championships.
Rugrby
The Michigan Rugby Club split two matches with Bowling Green over the
weekend. The A team dropped a 12-7 decision to the Falcons while the B
team was victorious 38-15.
In the A match, Michigan played most of its freshman and sophomore
players because Bowling Green was a young and inexperienced team.
"We played the younger guys; they've had little game experience and they
made a lot of mistakes," commented captain Greg Rose. "It was just a poor
afternoon."
Soccer
The graduate soccer team suffered a disappointing 3-0 loss to Detroit
Business College on Saturday in Ann Arbor.
Michigan dominated play most of the afternoon but several close shots
barely missed the mark or bounced harmlessly off the crossbar.
"We controlled play all day," commented captain Mike Backfield. "Their
goalie stopped a lot of key shots that he shouldn't have. We also made some
key defensive mistakes which accounted for their goals."
The Club Sports Roundup relates briefly the activities of Michigan
club sports during the previous week. This week's information was
compiled by Daily sports writer Dan Price.

A

small classes afford a relaxed at-
mosphere where common interests and
objectives for fitness, and fun are
socially integrated."
The non-athlete can be motivated into
participation of two or three 50-minute

classes such as beginning and advan-
ced levels for most of the sport classes
is for the person to continue his par-
ticipation and fitness development in an
activity he enjoys and achieves results
in.

BILLBOARD
Student tickets for Michigan Basket-
ball are still available at the Athletic
Ticket office at the corner of State and
Hoover. The price is $40 for a season
ticket.
In addition, the team will have a
scrimmage open to the public on
November 7 at 6:30 p.m. Admission
will be free and seating on a first-come-
first serve basis. Entrance for the con-
test can be gained through the tunnel
entrance of Crisler Arena.

4
6

I

WALK MANS Nat'I. Ady.
AM/FM Stereo Walkmans .................$89.90
Cassette Stereo Walkmans ..............$1-1A-O.
FM Stereo-Cassette Walkmans ............$179.W
Mini Cassette Recorders................>$6250
Portable AM/FM Cassette Stereo Systems ... $240.40
Stereo Full-Feature Clock Radios ............ $657
SOLD EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT 6-10 p.m. ONLY
at RAGS TO RICHES
1218 S. University-next to Campus Theater

UR PRICE
$25.00
$36.00
$58.00

$35.00
$75.00
$33.00

I

I

AP Top Twenty

t

I

F "

W ---I M

UPI Top Twenty *

1. Pitt (48) .............7-0-0
2. So. Methodist (5) .......8-0-0
3. Georgia (3)...........8-0-0
4. Arizona State (3) .......8-0-0
5. Arkansas (1)...........7-0-0
6. Nebraska ...............7-1-0
7. Penn State .............. 7-1-0
8. Alabama.............7-1-0
9. UCLA................7-0-1
10. Washington .............7-1-0
11. LSU ....................6-0-1
12. Florida State..........6-1-0
13. Clemson.............. 5-1-1
14. Oklahoma ..............6-2-0
15. MICHIGAN .............6-2-0
16. Southern Cal..........5-2-0
17. West Virginia .......... 6-2-0
18. North Carolina.........5-2-0
19. Maryland............6-2-0
20. Florida...............5-2-0

1,181
1,095
1,092
986
964
891
850
754
727
660
602
543
4,15
306
294
281
277
233
184
121

1. Pitt (33).............
2. Georgia (1) .........
3. So. Methodist (5),....
4. Arkansas (2) ..........
5. Nebraska (1) ........
6. Penn State........
7. Alabama............
8. UCLA.............
9. Washington ...........
10. LSU................
11. Florida State ........
12. Oklahoma.............
13. North Carolina.......
14. Clemson ..............
15. MICHIGAN ...........
16. West Virginia.......
17. Maryland ..........
18. Florida ................
19. Texas .................
20. Notre Dame ...........

7-0
8-0
7-0
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-0-1
7-1
6-0-1
6-1
6-2
5-2
5-1-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
5-2
4-2
5-1-1

'62
563
557
500
439
404
362
318
300
234
195
94
90
83
54
40
17
16
15

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES/FISHERIES...
You're Needed
AlI Over the
World.,
Ask Peace Corps Fishery volunteers why the rural farmers of
Nepal, Zaire and Samoa need them to help introduce fish pond
management, and harvesting techniques. They'll tell you they
ore helping to increase the world's food supply. And they'll tell
you they are helping improve the diets and futures of people in
developing notions. Ask them why Peace Corps is the toughest
job you'll ever love.
INTERVIEWS AT CAREER PLANNING AND
PLACEMENT, NOVEMBER 2, 3 and 4. SEE
PEACE CORPS REPS. BRING IN COMPLETED
APPLICATIONS OR CALL DETROIT OFFICE
1-800-226-7928
PEACE CORPS

Bowie-Hoo

AP Photo

Ex-commisioner of baseball Bowie Kuhn, sits with some of his mementos
gathered during his 14-year term as baseball's top man, in his office in New
York. The owners of the Major League baseball teams voted not to renew
Kuhn's contract. He will continue to run the league until his contract expires
in August next year.

SPORTS OF THE DAILY:

Rose extends contract with Phils

PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Pete Rose,
who will be 42 shortly after the 1983
baseball season opens, has signed a
one-year contract with the Philadelphia
Phillies, enabling him to continue his
pursuit of the major league career hit
record.
The contract reportedly is worth $1.2
million with a bonus of more than
$100,000 if Rose plays in more than 120
games.
THE PHILLIES and Rose have
scheduled an afternoon press conferen-
ce to make the formal announcement.
Rose has played in 622 straight
games, the 16th longest streak in
baseball history. The present longest
streak is 1,107 by Steve Garvey of the
Los Angeles Dodgers.
But if Phillies President Bill Giles
and Manager Pat Corrales have their
SHORT OR LONG
Hairstyles for
Men and Women
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Liberty off State ........668-9329
East U. at South U........662-0354
Arborland ..............971-9975
Maple Village ...........761-2733

way, Rose's consecutive game string
will be broken next year because they
feel he needs occasional rest during the
season to maintain his batting strength.
ROSE, OF course, says he can play
daily, but is willing to take some time
off if that's what the club wants.
In his 20-year career Rose has
missed just 80 games. He has played in
every game since signing with the
Phillies prior to the 1979 season.
Rose hit .271 last season, his lowest
batting average since 1963, when he
broke in with the Cincinnati Reds. He
had 172 hits; fewest since 1964.
Basically, he had a sporadic season of-
fensively for the player who leads the
National League in career hits, runs
scored, singles and doubles, games, at
bats and outs.
Garrev a free agent
SAN DIEGO (AP) - First baseman
Steve Garvey of the Los Angeles
Dodgers formally filed for free agency
yesterday, according to his agent,
Jerry Kapstein.
Garvey, who has played 12 full
seasons with the Dodgers and has a
career. 302 batting average, notified the
Major League Players Association of
his decision.
"I FELT WE had to file because our

MARIAH* *SHOWCASE JAZZ
PROUDLY PRESENTS
Ralph Towner
Paul McCandless
Glen Moore

next scheduled meeting with the
Dodgers is not until tomorrow after-
noon, which runs us right into the
deadline for filing," said Kapstein.
Eligible players who wish to be in-
cluded in the Nov. 10 re-entry draft
"must file for free agency by tomorrow.
The Dodgers still may sign Garvey up
until midnight, Saturday, Nov. 6, or
they may retain negotiating rights to
him at the draft and then negotiate with
him after Nov. 10.
THE AGENT said he had talked
with Dodger officials by telephone
Monday night.
"We continued our detailed
discussions," Kapsteinsaid.
"The conversation was businesslike
and friendly."
Lillis named manager
HOUSTON (AP) - Bob Lillis, who
piloted the Houston Astros on an in-
terim basis after Bill Virdon was fired,
yesterday was named manager of the
National League team.
Lillis, who replaced Virdon on Aug.
10 and led the Astros to a 28-23 record
during the rest of the season, said he
wasn't sure he would pursue the per-
manent job.
"I WASN'T sure how I'd wear it,"
Lillis said. "I -didn't know how the
players would respond. But they have
given a very positive response.',

I GRIDDE PICKS 1
Football fans everywhere are aware
of the great grid rivalries such as
Michigan-Ohio State, Nebraska-
Oklahoma, Penn State-Pittsburgh, and
USC-UCLA. Few people, however, are
aware of the intense series involving
Moorhead State vs Illinois State, and'
Morehead State vs. Liberty Baptist.
"We really get up for Moorhead
every year," said ISU coach Dick
Smith. "But you should see how much
Liberty prepares for their game. Those
Baptists want Morehead even worse
than we want Moorhead."
Will ISU and Liberty Baptist be ready
for Moorhead/Morehead? You decide
and bring your picks to the Daily before
midnight Friday. Winner gets a small,
one-item Pizza Bob's pizza.
1. MICHIGAN at Illinois (pick score)
2. Minnesota at Ohio State
3. Iowa at Purdue
4. Northwestern at MSU
5. Indiana at Wisconsin
6. Notre Dame at Pittsburgh
7. Arizona at Stanfo-d
8. UCLA at Washington
9. Alabama at LSU
10. North Carolina at Clemson
11. Miami (Fla.) at Maryland
12. Houston at Texas
13. Tulane at Mississippi
14. Georgia at Florida
15. Kent State at EasternMichigan
16. Moorhead State at Illinois State
17. Morehead State at Liberty Baptist
18. Pine Bluff at Prairie View
19. Millersville State at Slippery Rock
20. DAILY LIBELS at Wilted Illini Rose

Thursday Nov.4th,1982

Collin Walcott

---SCHOOL-OF--MEDICINE
"IIASU IVRIT

Fairchild Theater MSU

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan