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November 02, 1982 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-11-02

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 2, 1982-Page 5

0
Council
By KRISTIN STAPLETON
Tempers flared at last night's City
Council meeting, as the members
divided along partisan lines to debate a
proposal to spend $50,000 of city funds
for a job training program.
The council's Republican majority
eventually defeated the plan, proposed
by Rafael Ezekiel (D-Third Ward), but
not before the council sat back and wat-
ched a fierce debate between Ezekiel
and Republican Mayor Louis Belcher.
EZEKIEL asked that the council vote
to spend the money to aid the Ann Arbor
Employment and Training Center
(formerly the federal CETA program),
which helps train poor residents in
basic job skills.
But Belcher attacked the plan,
calling the proposal "shallow" and
sharply criticizing its Democratic sup-
porters for "throwing money at a
government program." Belcher said
the council should be spending its effor-
ts trying to bring "real jobs" to the city
by attracting new businesses and took
the opportunity to blame those
Democrats who have opposed plans for
tax breaks for new businesses and other
ideas backed by the Downtown
Development Authority.
Belcher said jobs 'do not come from
throwing $50,000 toward some nebulous
job training program, which no one's
defined. They come from the private
sector."
BUT EZEKIEL said the city should
worry about training its workers before
bringing jobs here. He said that even if
the city were able to attract new
businesses here, most unemployed
residents would not have the skills to fill
the new jobs.
Replying to Belcher's accusation that
the Democrats put too much emphasis
on the role of government in providing
jobs for the city's unemployed, Ezekial
said, "I am not a communist. I'm not
proposing to communize the city of Ann
Arbor. I believe we can flourish under
the system of free enterprise." He
stressed, however, that government
must do something to help those people
without the necessary skills to get
jobs-the structurally unemployed.
Ezekial said he proposed the

rejects jobs
resolution because of "mounting im- problems in th
patience with the dilatory way in which beyond."
we (council members) are dealing with Although a]
th'e subject of structural unem- council joine
ployment." defeating ther
Lowell Peterson (D-First Ward) said ferent reason
he agreed with the need to attract cilmember V
business to Ann Arbor, but he em- the opinion
phasized the importance of providing Republicans w
some way for unemployed people to cil wait untila
upgrade their skills. "By proposing to were identifie
spend $50,000 on job training," he said, much money
"we are not claiming to solve all the need.

plan
he world, the cosmos, and
ll of the Republicans on
ed with the mayor in
proposal, others cited dif-
ins for doing so. Coun-
irginia Johanson voiced,
of several of the
when she asked that coun-;
all human services needs:
ed before deciding how
to allocate to any one

Put Your Education to Work!!
You are receiving a fine education, but your future depends
on finding a quality employment opportunity where it can
work for you! You can succeed! Our copyrighted booklet,
"The Search For Quality Employment," prepares and guides
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1

ll

J

A group of West Quad residents eats lunch in the dormitory's recently-renovated cafeteria.

-I j7:

West Quad diners try out
'newly renovated, cafeteria

By BETH ALLEN
West quad has spent $117,000
renovating its cafeteria, but some
students who eat there say they can't
see, feel, or taste the difference.
The renovations, designed to replace
antiquated equipment, increase the ef-
iciency of traffic in and out of the
cafeteria, and make the dining rooms
"more visually appealing," are almost
completed according to Associate
Director of Housing Operations Norm
Sunstad.
THE BIGGEST change in the
cafeteria is the switch from a single-
line system for all food to a new
"scramble system," where students

can pick from a variety of stations for
their lunches and dinners. This change,
housing officials claim, should make
the lines in the dining rooms faster
because students can choose from a
number of counters where the food is
served. The problem at West Quad had
been that the one-line system backed up
traffic outside of the cafeteria into the
adjoining hallway.
But some students feel the change
has done little to get them seated with
their hamburgers faster.
"Getting your entree takes the
longest," said sophomore Kirsten
Filhart, a two-year West Quad resident.
"The outside line is shorter, but once

you're inside, it takes longer than it
used to."
WHILE HOUSING officials said the
average time for getting through the
line is the same or shorter than last
year - they timed the process with a
stopwatch - the office admitted that
lines are longer during peak meal
hours. But this is because meal atten-
dance is up significantly from last year,
officials said.
There are 100 more people than last
year coming to to every lunch, and 200
more coming to each dinner, according
to West Quad Food Services Manager
Dan Schleh.
See WEST, Page 6

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t *, .

*GEO contract defeated, apathy blamed
(Continued from Page 1)

m i__

to vote."
Burke said he believes the work of
Membership for a Fair Contract is
dividing the union and could cripple
GEO's effectiveness in representing
TAs and GAs bef'ore the University.
Jon Bekken, a leader of Membership
for a Fair Contract'and also a former
ember of GEO's steering committee,
aid that a strike is only one of several
possible courses of action being con-
sidered by his group. He said the for-
mation of a GEO strike committee
would not commit GEO to a strike, only
to examining the possibility of one.
EVEN ON the one point on which all

GEO leaders agree-the need to elect a
new bargaining team-GEO may have
trouble. Cay Horstmann, a member of
the union's election committee, said
GEO may discuss electing a new
bargaining team at its membership
meeting Thursday night. But he added
that with such short notice it may be
difficult to find persons willing to join
the team.
Also at its meeting Thursday, GEO
leaders will announce the final results
of the vote. But unofficial tabulations
indicate that the contract was defeated
by almost a two-to-one margin, Bekken
said.

Even though GEO agreed last week
to extend the time during which TAs
and GAs could vote, so that more
ballots could be collected, leaders
yesterday conceded that only about 20
new ballots were submitted after the
extension.
The vote threw out the proposed con-
tract, which was negotiated by ad-
ministrators and GEO members over a
four-month period ending last July.
GEO members voting against the
proposed contract said they hoped to
win promises of exemption from
tuition, better pay, and greater affir-
mative action plans in a new contract.
A READING BY
ALICE NOTLEY
Benzlnger Library/East Quad

PRE-BUSINESS
MBA DAY

}
t
4 j

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO VISIT WITH ADMISSIONS OFFICERS
AND DEANS FROM SEVERAL GRADUATE SCHOOLS OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION. INFORMATION ON ADMISSIONS, COURSE

Irish inspired by others

REQUIREMEN
DEGREE.

TS AND CAREER OPP
TUES. NOV. 2

ORTUNITIES WITH

M.B.A.

1-4 pm

.Imlh

51 ontinued from Page 2)
Britain stop using them. Urging
Americans to sign the petitions, Devlin-
McAliskey said, "The U.S. government
tends to hedge its bets and do nothing."
Public opinion must be used to force the
government to take action," she said.
DURING HER speech, Devlin-
McAliskey gave the crowd a brief
history of the more important events in
the Irish civil rights movements.
Between 1973 and 1976 the Catholics
*were "open season" for the British
because the civil rights movement was
divided, she explained. "Our backs
were to the wall."
When political prisoners were jailed
in 1976, they refused to wear the
uniform of the common criminals, and
had only a blanket to cover their bodies,
she said.
In 1979, prison officials refused to let
~them use the bathrooms and they lived
in their own filth, she added. This led to
the hunger strikes in which ten men
eventually died, but she insisted that
the strikes were not publicity stunts.
Food was the only thing the prisoners
had, she said, and it was their only
weapon.

"She looks worn down," said Jeff
Johnson, a California lawyer who has
followed the Irish situation closely.
"She was a lot different ten years ago,"
he said.

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