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October 29, 1982 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-29

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 29, 1982-Page 5
omecomin:Fairest loat wis

By CHERYL BACCKE
What's better than a Homecoming parade with
floats? A parade with a float competition. The
sororities and fraternities will battle it out to see
whose float in today's parade is better.
Two new entrants will be joining the Greeks, this
year. One is a rather unique group called "A Bunch of
Really Clean-cut Guys." The five pre-medicine and
engineering students identify themselves only as Biff
Davey, Palooka Koster, Nancy Warren, Wandingo
Weiss, and Fligus Kunkel.
DAVEY SAID the float will be titled either "Some
Things Never Change" or "Real Students Don't Have
Time For This Bullshit." The float will display desks,

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE RAKE'S PROGRESS:
Backgrounds 8 Musical Illustrations
A Lecture by GLENN WATKINS
Professor of Music History/Musicology
The U-M School of Music
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 4 PM
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
A Prelude to the November 4-7 Performances
in Power Center

typewriters, and the "Clean-cut Guys."
"They don't have much time to take off to be in a
parade, so they'll have their books with them,"
Davey said.
A group of students working for senatorial can-
didate Phil Ruppe will also enter a float, which will be
a car decorated with posters.
TRIANGLE fraternity member Kurt Fisher said
Greek system members enjoy building the floats. "It
gets everyone together to have a good time," he said.
All floats must follow the Homecoming theme this
year, "A Flash From the Past ... A Look Towards
the Future." A few groups keep their floats a secret

until the parade, but some say they just aren't sure
how the floats will turn out.
Junior Chris Xiromeritis, who is among the Bur-
sley residents building a float, said, "There's the
plan, and then there's what it will end up as."
The costs for building the floats, quoted by this
year's participants, range from $400 for the Kappa
Kappa Gamma/Zeta Psi float to $30 for the "Clean-
cut Guys" float. "The most important part is the
ideas and those are cheap," said Davey.
Xiromeritis said he and other Bursley residents are
entering a float because "it seems a shame to have a
Homecoming parade with no floats."

Pilot Program begins 20th
year of residential classes

Homecoming
1982
HOMECOMING * HALLOWEEN
MASQUERADE BALL

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(Continued from Page 3)
THE PROGRAM is a two-year sup-
plemental program within LSA
designed to combine the academic and
residential experience. The small size
of the program, currently about 500
students, helps integrate students
gradually into the large University,
Schoem said.
Students are admitted to the program
on a first-come, first-serve basis, after
indicating on their housing applications
that they would like to join. There are
no rigid rules or requirements to be in
the program, except that the student
must live in Lloyd. They may, if they
like, take the special courses which
make the program unique, but it is not
required.
These classes are held in Lloyd and
are taught by resident fellows,
graduate students who live in the dorm
and also act as resident advisors.
Sophomores who live in Lloyd and have
been in the program for a year act as
student advisors, also.
"It's nice to have your teachers living
with you, because they are always
there to help you on a paper," said
freshperson Vicki Heller. "If you are
having problems with an assignment at
one in the morning, all you have to do is
run downstairs."
SOME STUDENTS, however, find
that having their classes and their
teachers in the dorm is a drawback. "I
don't think there is a healthy relation-
ship between teachers and students,"
said freshperson Karen Schwartz. The
teachers know the students so well that
they trust you more. For this reason,
some of the classes are easier in tht
program than if they were taken out-
side, in the University."
Michael Berger, a pilot program
student, agreed. "On the whole, classes
taken in the Pilot Program are easier
than most of the same calibre taken
outside of the program," he said.
The RFs design their own courses
and choose their own texts and other
materials of their own choice to guide
discussions. Schoem must approve a
RF's course idea, and then it goes to the
Pilot Standing Committee, which is
composed of housing and academic of-
ficials.
THE PILOT Program offers several
English 125, Freshman Composition,
courses with specific themes, such as
"Propaganda War" or "A Critical Look
at Love." Seminars, theme courses,
and mini-courses are also offered.
Freshperson Lauren Bricker said she
thinks the Freshman Composition
classes are popular because they "have
topics, so they aren't just regular
English 125 courses."
A main goal of the program, accor-
ding to Schoem, is to create a sense of
closeness between residents. "We have

,..-

worked real hard to create a com-
munity atmosphere at Lloyd," he said.
BILL SHEA, a Lloyd RF, said he sees
his role partially as a big brother to
students. "The sense of privacy is lost
at times, but there is a sort of kinship
that helps out the situation."
Some students, however, don't feel
that the program does what it set out to
do. Adam Rubinstein, a sophomore who
was in the program last year, said he
"just doesn't think the program ac-
complishes anything. (It) really doesn't
offer many classes besides the English
125 classes so the program bases its
success on students taking one course
during their entire Pilot Program ex-
perience."
Many students said they signed up for
the program because they wanted to be
sure to get a room in Alice Lloyd dor-
mitory.
"I wanted to be assured housing (in
Lloyd), so I signed up for the Pilot
Program not knowing about it," said
freshperson Alyssa Alper.
The Pilot Program was housed in
East Quad and then in Markely during
the first few years of its existence. In
1968 it came to its present home, where
"the ideas of both a living and learning
program jelled," Schoem said.
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