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October 27, 1982 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


'Dialogue' line
offers callers
chance to argue

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October 27, 1982-Page 3

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Rent a Car from Econo-Car

OPEN 7
DAYS A WEEK

f + Z7

Daily Photo by DOUG McMAHON
Bridging the gap
This construction worker seems dwarfed by the enormity of his project, the
new Fuller Street bridge.
- PPE I
Highlight
The Michigan Historical Museum will hold its annual free Fall Festival qn
the East Lawn of the State Capitol, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Live folk
music, craft demonstrations and freshly-pressed apple cider will be features
of the event. For further information, call the museum at (517) 373-1979.
Films
CFT-Dr. No, 2 p.m. and 10 p.m., Michigan Theater.
CFT-From Russia With Love, 4 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
CFT-You Only Live Twice, 6 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Hill Street Cinema-Casablanca, 7 and 9 p.m., Hill Street.
AAPS-Nick Mazzuco: Biography of an Atomic Vet, 8:30 p.m., East Quad
r(Free).
( )CG-The Stunt Man, 7 and 9:20 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Performances
Musical Society-Chamber Arts Series, Fresk String Quartet, 8:30 p.m.,
Rackham Auditorium.
Speakers
Psyhiatry-Lee Gerald Grob, "Rediscovering 'the Asylumi: The History
of American Institutional Psychiatry (1875-1941)," 10:3-non, CPHA Aud.'
Communication-Brown Bag Seminar, William Porter, "The Italian
Journalist," noon, 2050 Frieze.
Russian and East European Studies-Brown Bag Lee., Jaroslav Krejci,
"Democracy and Socialism: Conceptual and Empirical Analysis (Test
Case: Central Europe)," noon, Lane Hall Commons.
Ethics and Religion Office and Cantebury Loft-Bent Lee. Series, Alfred
Meyer, "On the Nature of Facism Today," 5 p.m., Aud. A Angell.
Transcendental Mediation Program-Free Public Lee., 8 p.m., 5208 W.
Liberty.
Linguistics-Colloquium, Alexis Manaster-Ramer, "The Hard and the
Soft," 4-6 p.m., 2050 Frieze.
Social Work-Colloquium, Herbert Bisno, "The Human Rights, Cultural
Relativism and Social Work-Uncovering the Empirical Base for Policy and
Practice," noon, Student Lounge, 4th floor, Frieze.
Chemistry-Analytical Sem., Sandra Parks, "Phosphorus NMR Methods
and Medical Applications," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Chemistry-Organic Seminar, Ming-Jye Lan, "Synthesis of Poly Meric
Thermotropic Liquid Crystals-Polymers with Mesomorphic Side Groups,"
4p.m.,1300 Chem.
Museum of Art-Art Break, Barbara Krause, "On Track," 12:10-12:30
p.m., Stella Exhibition.
Dept. of Classical Studies-Colloquium, Asst. Professor Michelle Gellrich,
"On Greek Tragedy and the Kantian Subline," 4:10 p.m., 2009 Angell Hall.
Dept. of Statistics-Tom Hammerstrom, "Non-parametric Test for Lack
of Linear Fit and Regression," 4 p.m., 451 Mason.
Meetings
Science Fiction Club-Mtg., "Stilyagi Air Corps," Ground Fl. Conf. Rm.,
8:15 p.m., Union.
Academics Alcoholics-1:30 p.m., Alano Club.
Operations Crossroads Africa-Information Mtg., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 1310
Union.
Latin American Solidarity Committee-7:30 p.m., location-will be posted
at Rm. 4120, Union.
Univ. Editor's Forum-Mtg., Richard Kennedy, 3:30 p.m., Regents' Rm.,
Fleming Admin. Bldg.
Miscellaneous
WCBN-"Radio Free Lawyer," discussion of legal issues, 6 p.m., 88.3 FM.
School of Music-Tour of Carillon, 4-5 p.m., top of Burton Tower.
Tae Kwon Do Club-Martial Arts Practice, 6-8 p.m., Sports Coliseum.
Mott's Children Hosp., Pediatric Nursing-4th Annual Pediatric Nursing
Conf., "Focus on the Hospitalized Child," 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Briarwood
Hilton.
Women Engineers-Pre-Interview, Chevron, 8:30-12:30 p.m., 146 W. Eng.
Michigan Media and CRLT-Faculty Instructional Workshop, "Overhead
Transparency Production," 7-11 p.m., registration required, 763-2396.
Artists and Craftsmen Guild-Workshop, Nancy Thayer, "The Business of
Being an Artist," 9-5 p.m., Union.
Student Wood and Crafts Shop-Power Tools safety, 6-8 p.m., 537 SAB.
Gay Awareness Program-Workshop to increase heterosexuals'
awareness of homosexuality, 8-10 p.m., Angela Davis Lounge, Mary
Markley Hall.
Student Wood and Crafts Shop-Intro, to Woodworking, 7 p.m., 537 SAB.
Amnesty International-Bucket drive to help fight human rights
violations, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Diag.

By CARL WEISER
There's a new message on the
telephone lines in Ann Arbor but, unlike
"Dial-a-Prayer" or "Dial Dr. Joyce
Brothers," callers to the "Dialogue
Connection" can talk back.
"Dialogue Connection" is a
philosophical or political discussion
"overheard" by the caller. The conver-
sations cover such varied subjects as
"E.T." and G. Gordon Liddy's
scheduled appearance'in Ann Arbor
next month.
A CALLER'S response to the
discussion is recorded on tape after
each dialogue. A dialer can even leave
his number to continue the discussion
later.
The dialogues present the
philosophies of an Ann Arbor spiritual
group called the New Age Movement.
One of the movement's leaders is Rev.
Craig Wilder, a Methodist minister who
spent 15 years in Singapore.
Wilder said he is enthusiastic about
the "space age possibility" of talking
back. So far, the "connection" has
yielded a few interesting comments,
but mostly conversion 'attempts by
Fundamentalist preachers, he said.
OTHER CALLERS respond with
questions or confessions. One
anguished caller complained he "could
not see a difference between right and
wrong in the '80s," Wilder said.
Eventually, Wilder would like to
make "Dialogue Connection" a call-in
dialogue, in which a real person an-
swers and carries on a discussion with
1400 defend
Ed. school
(Continued from Page 1)
Alfred Lorenzo, president of Macomb
County Community College defended
the quality of the school's graduate
students. "At Macomb, we employ doc-
toral interns from U of M and three
other state universities," he said. "The
U of M students consistently have
greater capability in their work and
morrintest in innovative methods of
education.
"There may be competition and
repetition of programs in the state, but
U of M is unparalleled in its quality,"
Lorenzo added.
Mary Lou Tucker, a second-year
University doctoral student in
educational psychology, said the school
compares favorably with other in-
stitutions around the country.
"I'VE STUDIED at American
University, Washington University,
and New York State University, and I
think the U of M programs are of the
highest quality," she said. "The
University must look to the future,
beyond the present economic crisis,"
she added.
Tim Heaney, another doctoral
student in education, said he was
'ashamed' of some of the classes he
took in education, "but others were
challenging, drove me to do my best
work, and helped me in my career.
"It's incumbent on the reviewers to
focus on what's good as well as what's
bad," he said. "Don't let internal
pressures hinder you in a just
decision."
Members of the seven-member
review committee asked questions of
the speakers, often to the grumbling of
the school's advocates.
Education officials were pleased with
the turnout, but hoped for a larger room
to hold the future hearings, scheduled
for Oct. 30, Nov. 1, and Nov. 3, to
alleviate the overcrowding like that at
last night's meeting.

the caller. Right now the answerer is a
tape recorder with time for a 30-minute
message and an unlimited response.
The equipment has no counter,
Wilder said, so there is no way of
knowing how many people call unless
they leave comments. He said the
response has been growing, but until
recently students were not the primary
audience. The New Age Movement has
decided to shift the focus of "Dialogue
Connection" from area residents to the
University community.
TO WILDER, "Dialogue Connection"
has many uses. For the caller, it is a
chance to seek guidance beyond his
peers, he said. This can help people
search for "the real being," though it
may require an "agonizing reap-
praisal" of their life, Wilder said. The
primary purpose of the dialogues is to
spread the main arguments of the New
Age Movement.
Wilder said the New Age Movement
believes American society is a "cut-
flower civilization," a seemingly
beautiful form actually cut off from its
roots and traditions, therefore
deteriorating slowly. Although the New
Age Movement has worked on such
political issues as the nuclear freeze,
Wilder said it is not a political group.
"We are a humanitarian group," he
said. "The New Age Movement is a
group of people with a vision, but of
course we realize we're not going to
start a revolution or change the world."
"Dialogue Connection" is the brain-
child of Dr. Rodney Moag, who is
currently the technical director, and 25
other people associated with the New
Age Movement. A similar phone ser-
vice was tried two years ago, but it did
not have the unlimited response time
the new "Dialogue Connection" has.
Wilder said the first service turned into
a crisis/confession line, which was not
the intended purpose.
The money for this operation comes
from volunteers' pockets. The tape
recorder costs $400 a month to rent, so a
foundation grant may be sought in the
future, said Wilder. The "Dialogue
Connection" offices are in the
Language Communication Specialists
office in Huron Towers.
The "Dialogue Connection" runs 24
hours each day and can be reached at
996-9700.

6Z

No

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Time 11:00 - 4:00
Place Ulrich's Books
Main Store: Electronics Showroom:
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(at the corner of E. University and S. University 662-3201)

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To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

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