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October 22, 1982 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-22

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4

e 12-Friday, October 22, 1982-The Michigan Daily

'M' a family tradition fo

y
w

By TIM MAKINEN
The odds were excellent that Kay McCarthy would
attend the University of Michigan.
McCarthy, the junior scoring machine of this
year's field hockey team, is the fourth member of her
family to come to Michigan. Her father, sister, and
brother also made the long trip from their Dover, ;
Massachusetts home for the experience of a
Michigan education. Michigan field hockey fans can
be very thankful that Kay did not break family
tradition.
PLAYING FROM the link position, McCarthy has
put the ball in the net with a regularity that frightens
opposing goalies. This year, McCarthy has scored an
amazing 14 goals in just 28 shots; and the end is
nowhere is sight.
Of course, no one begins as a star, as McCarthy will j
readily testify. "When I first came here to try out,"
explains McCarthy, "my sister showed me how to In-
dian dribble, which I had never even done before. I
was really scared. You're always scared "as a fresh-
man."

McCarthy's sister, in fact, was a captain of
Michigan's 1979 field hockey squad and has definitely
been a force in Kay's career.
"MY SISTER was the one who urged me to try out
here. I never got any pressure from my parents. I
followed in everything that she did: basketball, field
hockey, you name it. But I never got to play on the
same team as her, which is kind of a bummer," says
McCarthy.
Although her sister has long since graduated, Mc-
Carthy can always visit with her brother, a senior,
should homesickness ever grab her. "He's fun, we do
a lot together. It still helps having him here," says
Kay.
But for the moment, McCarthy is extremely
pleased with the unity and friendship gained from
being a member of the team. Michigan, currently 8-2,
has a chance of making it to the nationals this year,
and that is something that McCarthy is willing to put
forth all her effort to achieve. She has no regrets
about not choosing an eastern school with a stronger
emphasis on field hockey.
"THE CALIBRE of play (out East) used to be a lot

r McCarthy
greater, but now with Iowa ranked number one, that
shows that the Big Ten can't be forgetten," says Mc-
Carthy.
As for her phenominal scoring, McCarthy
dismisses it as not that important. "If I score,: 1,
score," shrugs McCarthy. "As long as we win, I dons(.
care who does it."
In her spare time, McCarthy may be found working
on her physical education degree (she intends to4%d
graduate level work in special education afdE
rehabilitation) or possibly at a local movie theate,
catching a flick. A lover of movies, McCarthy cite
E.T. as one of her favorites and also a favorite
many of her teammates. Perhaps that explains the)
team's play this year which has definitely been outef
this world.
Unfortunately for Michigan, Kay is the youngest:
girl in her family, and it could be a long time befor
another McCarthy dons a Maize and Blue uniform. 'A
the moment though, it is enough to sit back and ar
mire the fine performance displayed on the field thi
season.
Charles

'M' rowers head to St.

Daiy rPoto by SCOi I UuLN
Junior sticker Kay McCarthy demonstrates the shot that she has used to
score 14 goals in just 28 attempts this year for the Wolverine field hockey
squad. Kay, a Dover, Mass, native, kept a family tradition alive by being the
fourth McCarthy to attend Michigan.
ANN ARBOR'S'
GREAT

By TOM EHR
Barton Pond is not just for ducks
anymore. While the fish and fowl may
still have property rights to this body of
water approximately three miles nor-
theast of campus, they are no longer
alone. For beginning this fall, Barton
Pond is the new practice site for the
Michigan Rowing Club. This week's
practices have been particularly im-
portant as the club prepares for their
biggest meet of the fall season, the
Head of the Charles event in Boston.
"The Head" as the meet is affec-

tionately referred to, is one of the
biggest of all rowing events. Over 2,000
competitors will converge on the St.
Charles River, representing teams
from most of the Midwest and East
Coast. Among those participating are
perennial eastern powerhouse such as
Yale, Harvard, Brown,and the Coast
Guard Academy; Wisconsin, the best of
the Midwest, and of course Michigan.
THE WOLVERINE rowing (also
referred to as crew) team is unique
among the aforementioned teams
because it is a club not a varsity sport.
Funds have to be raised by holding

special events, such as the "Rowathon"
held earlier this month on the Diag.
This has somewhat hampered the
development of the sport at Michigan,
according to mens' varsity coach
Dustin Ordway.
"If we could set some money aside
for a really good coach we could have.
one of the best teams in the country.
There is national - level talent here
which needs to be developed."
PREPARATIONS for events like
"the Heats" run year round, which
makes rowing an especially demanding
sport. The rower follows a different
agenda for each season. Fall, when
many of the club members first begin to
row, is actually a training period for the
spring. Technique is introduced and
improved upon, and the new rower first
learns the joys of conditioning.
As the approaching winter months

freeze the river, the Rowing Club doedki
slow at all. Weight training and run=
ning take the place of rowing, and the
rowers head into the all-important
spring season in better'shape than ever.
Spring to rowers is like fall to football
players. Most meets are held in the-
spring, including the Midwestern Sprin
ts in Madison, Wisc., the Dad Vails fnl
Philadelphia, where more than forty'
teams compete.
WITH ALL THIS work and pain, why
would any sane person want to row's;
Teamwork is a big factor, according to
sophomore varsity member Kyle Mc
Daniel.
"Rowing is the only sport in which
eight people can combine discipline,
physical strengths and grace in a single
concentrated effort.

mw - i

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HALLOWEEN

V

KESPER HEIUSER

N ~' STORE
FEATURING A LARGE
SELECTION OF MAKE-UP KITS
NOSE & GLASSES * WIGS
DISGUISES * MASKS
PHANTOM FEET & HANDS
CAMPUS BIKE & TOY M-F9:30 7 5h 30s9:30-6
514 E. WILLIAM ST. VERY REASONABLE
662-0035 PRICES
_ _ a M __

O Crucial 19th Century Riddle
a public lecture by
Robert van Santen,
President, Rudolf Steiner College, Sacramento, CA
Saturday, Oct. 23-8 p.m.-at the
RUDOLF STEINER INSTITUTE
1923 Geddes Avenue
donation $3

MINI-COURSE 313
The Holocaust
it's literary and ideological origins on manifesta-
tions. Ideas behind the event.
Mon, Wed-3-4:30
Oct. 25-Nov. 22 Registration
GERMAN DEPT. 3110 MLB

students, senior citizens $2

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