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September 09, 1982 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-09

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THE ECONOMY'S PINCH hasn't been too tight on campus area businesses,
:like these on Main Street, according to their owners.
Sale's stay
I
I
steadyfor
'area mec at

By CHARLES THOMSON
Though they say "that they are
~relatively sheltered' from the
vicissitudes of the national economy,
campus area merchants admit that
they are feeling this recession.
Sales to the student community
,haven't actually fallen, prominent local
,buisnesspersons say, but they haven't
-grown any either. Student shoppers
have become much more selective and
cost conscious, they say.
"RIGHT NOW, we have to work
much harder to get the sales than
,before," said Saigdy Guinness, the
district sales manager for the two
,,Community Newscenters in-Ann Arbor..
According to Guinness, the recession
has made customers pay more atten-
~tion to price than in previous years, and
they are willing to sacrifice buying cer-
tain items.
*"People are asking when something
will come out in paperback-and
they're willing to wait six months for
'that book while they buy something else
to read in the meantime." Hardcover
books, many of which are priced bet-
ween $15 and $20, meet considerable
resistance from customers, said Gumn-
ness, "especially when you figure
students are picking up a lot of expen-
sive textbooks."
"Ann Arbor is affected probably the
least of any of the cities of its size," said
George Wild, owner of Wild -Co. men's
'store on State Street. "The University
is the crux of the town," he said, and its
relatively affluent students and steady
payroll help to cushion businesse§ from
the worst of recessions.
WILD SAID the typical effect of

recessions on Ann Arbor retail trade is
a flattening of sales, rather than a
decline in them. "Usually, their growth
is taken away a bit," he said. So far this
year, his sales have been just about
even with last year.
Other businesses report similar con-
ditions. "We haven't had a noticeable
decrease in business," said Rick Buhr,
part owner of Good Time Charley's Bar
and Grill. "Actually, we're almost
holding our own."
But students are cutting back in what
they spend on entertainment, he said.
"We're certainly a non-necessity type
of deal. There doesn't seem to be that
extra number of dollars for people to
spend somewhat frivolously," he said.
"People aren't ordering desserts; in-
stead of having soda they're having
water.... A lot more people are taking
advantage of our specials."
NORM FOLZ, manager of Dooley's,
another campus-area bar, said his
business was off slightly during the first
quarter of the year and blamed the
decline on students having "less
discretionary income."
"They're just not spending as much
as they used to," he said. "I think
people have really sorted out their
priorities."
Some businesses say their merchan-
dising strategies and sales patterns
have been changed as a result of the
recession. Guinness said her shops
were selling far more greeting cards
than before, a reflection, she said, of an
increasing tendency among students to
give cards rather than actual presents
to friends and relatives.
See SALES, Page 7

By SCOTT STUCKAL
It's a basic fact of life. You can't go to
school without money. And it's pretty
hard to handle money without a bank.
No matter what your banking needs
are, it is worth the trouble of in-
vestigating Ann Arbor's banks to find
the one that best suits you. There is no
substitute for actually going into
several of them and seeing whether you
like the tellers, if there are long lines,
and anything that is important to you in
a bank.
DO NOT be convinced by just size or
proximity. If a bank is a block away
from your house, but doesn't have
checking accounts and you prefer to
pay most of your bills by check, it's not
the one for you.

The bank with the most locations
near campus is Ann Arbor Bank and
Trust. It has four campus locations, and
money machines in convenient places,
including inside the Michigan Union
and outside the Administrative Ser-
vices Building, near the football
stadium.
Students leaving town for the sum-
mer can keep their bank accounts open
at Ann Arbor Bank and Trust without
paying service charges, said Kris
Peterson, a marketing coordinator for
the bank.
HURON VALLEY National Bank,
another bank located on campus, has
gone to lengths to attract student
customers. Last fall they boasted "the
fastest checkbook in town" when they
offered a no-hassle procedure to open a

checking account in just a few minutes.
Huron Valley will give students a
special incentive to open an account
again this fall, said Jim Guibalt, the
bank's marketing manager. And, of
course, there is almost always a supply
of fresh apples in the bank lobby for
hungry students. "If we ever run out of
apples, boy do we hear about it,"
Guibalt said.
Michigan National Bank has bran-
ches all over the state, along with one in
Ann Arbor, which allows in-state
students to have the same bank at home
and at school. Parents can easily send
their children money by depositing it in
the Michigan National in their home
town branch.
The National Bank and Trust'Co-
pany of Ann Arbor has twoloain
CHECKING
WITH INTEREST

near campus\, and a slew of moneys
machines across town. They also offer
new customers a traditional banking
gift of a calendar.
A unique combined savings-checking
account, which allows customers- to
automatically transfer money between
accounts, is offered at National Bank
and Trust.
Students employed by the University
who receive a University paycheck (not
a financial aid check) have the oppor-_
tunity to join the Employees Credit,
Union, whichl offers - fuil banking ser-
vices to its members.
The credit union board of directors is
elected by the members of the credit
union and at the end of the year, the
credit union's profits are given back to
its members in the form of a dividend.

CHECKING

SAVINGS

A PAPER RUN
WITH PRIDE
The University of Michigan's Student
Newspaper since 1890 features:
* The only morning paper in Ann
Arbor
" Issues delivered 6 days a week,
Tuesday-Sunday
* 32,000 readership
* Campus, local, national and
international coverage

BANKS

5
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2

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4AR

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,a

BaR
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2

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Ann Arbor Bank 1$1.50TIplus1'$3 plus 41pr1mnth
and Trust 1 5.25%! $25 5.25%! 4pron/
$1 I $200 I 14@ per $7 $2,000 15¢ per 5.7%$2 547 75t each yes
(14 locations) check item____the're5afte5r7

Huron Valley National
Bank
(7 locations)

$50

$199

$2 plus
10¢ per
check

$5 if paid,
$7 if
returned

$1,000 or
$1,750
average

$4 plus
25Q per
item

5.25%!
5.47%

$50

5.25%!
5.389

4 per month,
$1 each
thereafter

yes 0*

Michigan National $199 or $1.50 plus $500 or $4 plus 52% .5!nn e
BnofAnAbr$100 $500 average 18Q per $10 $5,000 22Q per 5.47% $5 54%nn
(7 locations) per month check average check
National Bank and $199 or12prqat,
Trust $50 $500 average $4 $9 $1,000 $6 5.25%/5.47%,. $50 5.45%/ thereaftere
(12 locations) per month 5.47%________thereafter__ ________

U-M Employees Credit
Union
(1 location)

none

none

none I

none

none

none

2%

$5

5%/
5.61%

none

yes;4

. a a .

AATU still working for better housing

(Continued from Page 3) :
the big guys that are the worst. You
have the same problems with small
landlords. You have to be selective."
THE AATU ALSO provides some

to four months.
IN ADDITION to the legal counseling
services provided by the AATU, printed
materials are available for purchase.
These include a tenants primer, "How

walk-in counseling and hopes to con-
tinue a call-in show on WCBN radio
(88.3 FM).
COHEN ADDED, however, a lack of
funds remains a problem for AATU.

citizens $5, and for organizations $25.
The fee entitles members to reduced
rates on AATU literature, a free
newsletter, and free, counseling if the
AATU decides to charge for the service.
-t. ...« A A m T .-.- . L.-.... ,

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