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October 15, 1982 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-15

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 15, 1982-Page 11

AATU determined to survive

By BETH ALLEN
Struggling to survive in the face of
serious financial setbacks, leaders of
the Ann Arbor Tenants' Union say theiy
e down but definitely not out.
The financial crunch has forced the
student housing group to make deep
cutbacks in its organization, including
letting go its salaried director and
several work/study staff members.
DALE COHEN, the group's director,
said its financial problems stem from
the fact that office expenses in past
years have outstripped the group's
revenues from donations and student
overnment allocations.
But members of the Tenants' Union,
which is devoted to promoting the
rights of student tenants, say they are
determined to see that their cause sur-
vives despite the cutbacks.

Cohen, who will lose his job after
already working without pay because of
the cutbacks, emphasized that, "We're
not going to fold."
In fact, members are looking on the
bright side. Instead of lamenting that
the cutbacks have cost the jobs of
several counselors, requiring that
counseling services be sharply cur-
tailed, members say it's really all for
the best. They point out that the reduc-
tion in hours will give new staff mem-
bers more time to study under ex-
perienced counselors before striking
out on their own.
THE CUTBACKS have forced the
union to eliminate all counseling over
the telephone, said, Program Director
Maureen Delp, who will be the union's
only paid staff member in charge of
training new workers. Besides Delp,

about 25 regular volunteers and bet-
ween 10 and 20 "casual volunteers"staff
the union, Cohen said.
In spite of the worries about cut-
backs, Tenants' Union leaders are still
talking about the possibility of expan-
sion.
Cohen said the union is creating a
new board of directors to bring a more
diverse, community-oriented element
into the organization. The group also
plans to rewrite its bylaws and
reorganize its bookkeeping procedures
in order to qualify for federal grants.
The Tenants' Union would like to
rebuild its budget with grants from the
federally-funded Ann Arbor Com-
munity Development Office, Cohen
said. But, to qualify, the group must be
non-profit, prohibiting it from taking

part in political lobbying, which was its
original purpose.
Therefore, Cohen said, the group may
split into two units. One, funded with
the federal grants, would be concerned
only with counseling and educating
tenants. The other would continue to
lobby in Lansing for tenant legislation.
Apartment robbed
A woman's apartment on the 200
block of N. Ingalls was robbed re-
cently. The victim awoke to find a man
standing in her hallway. He im-
mediately fled through the window
t.hrough which he entered the apar-
tment, taking with him a purse and a
gold ring valued at $405.

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Citizens rescue, renew Michigan Theatre

y HALLE CZECHOWSKI
The Grande Old Dame of Ann Arbor
theatre will receive a $1.7 million
facelift this fall, with work scheduled to,
begin in a few weeks.
Renovation of the 52-year-old
Michigan Theatre is the result of
sustained citizen efforts to save the
building, which culminated last April
with the passage of a $200,000 municipal
bond to finance initial repairs.
THE MICHIGAN Community
Theatre Foundation (MCTF) is now
working on a Capital Fund Drive tb
raise the $1.5 million needed to finish
the project.
The theatre, built in 1928 as a
vaudeville house, has been rented in
recent years by Butterfield Enterprises
for showing movies. When the chain
announced plans to give up the lease
and destroy the building, the City of,
Polish rioting
clais victllm
(Continued from Page 1)
officials, Interpress said.
THE NEW unrest followed riots and
Strikes in Gdansk Monday and
Tuesday and street protests Wednesday
in Wroclaw and Nowa Huta. The
government reported 148 arrests in
Gdansk and 170 in Wroclaw.
Blaming the Solidarity underground
for the strikes and riots, the Communist
Party daily Trybuna Ludu said yester-
day that such actions could "extend,
contrary to the government's inten-
tions, the period of extraordinary
measures." -
0 Poland's martial law chief and
Communist Party leader, Gen.
Wojciech Jaruzelski, said after
Parliament outlawed Solidarity Friday
that protests had slowed the gover-
nment's plan to lift military rule by the
end of this year but not "crossed it out."
NONETHELESS, leaflets circulated
yesterday by underground Solidarity
leaders said plants with more than 2,000
workers in Warsaw should begin work
*stoppages in sympathy with the Gdansk
shipyards workers.

Ann Arbor bought the theatre.
The city set up a plan with MCTF,
allowing the group to lease the theatre
from it.for 15 years. MCTF eventually
will buy it, using box office#revenue,
private donations, and part of the
money already paid to the city as rent.
IN ADDITION MCTF decided to
restore the theatre to -its original 1928
appearance.
CityrCouncil decided to help by
placing the $200,000 bond issue on last
April's ballot. "City administration
drafted the legislation and came up
with the $200,000 figure by themselves,"
said Lonnie Loy, chairman of MCTF's
Board of Trustees. The bond will only
pay for the first phase of the
renovations which will bring the
theatre up to current city building
codes.
The work will include repairing the
wiring, railings, exits, handicap

restrictions, and the heating system,
said Elwood Holman, chairman of MC-
TF's restoration committee.
"Basically it's $200,000 worth of stuff
that no one is ever going to see," Loy
added.
THE SECOND phase of renovations,
costing about $1.5 million, will make
changes in the physical appearance of
the building. The theatre will have the
look of 1928, but with "state of the art"
technology, Holman said.
These renovations include moder-
nizing the dressing rooms, making the
stage more versatile, and returning the
lobby to its original appearance by hand-
painting the ceiling, shining the brass,
and installing new carpeting.
Holman said he couldn't give a
definite completion date. "I'd love to
have it all put together and ready to go
by 1984, but that's being a little op-
timistic," he said.

A. J. MENLOVE and Associates, a
professional fund raising company, will
solicit donations from private firms and
individuals for the'theatre's fund drive
to cover these renovations.
So far, "there has not been a
significant amount of money raised,"
according to Bruce Amrine, MCTF
treasurer, and a majority of it has come
from trustee member donations. The
drive,zhowever, is still indthe
organizational stages, he added.
The theatre is currently without a
manager, but the Board of Trustees
plans to make a final decision about a
replacement within the next two weeks,
Loy said.
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