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October 15, 1982 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 15, 1982-Page 9,
Shipper of stolen 'U'
library books convicted

By DAN GRANTHAM
A St. Louis man was convicted
Tuesday of shipping stolen books, in-
cluding some from University of
Michigan libraries.
Paul Shinn pleaded guilty and was
sentenced to twenty years in prison by
U.S. District Court Judge Daniel Huyett
in Philadelphia. Huyett gave Shinn the
maximum sentence available, calling
the crime "reprehensible."
SHINN, 46, was convicted of shipping
over 400 rare books valued at $100,000
from Urbana, Ill. to Allentown, Pa. in
Sept. 1981. The books were stolen from
approximately 20 different university
libraries around the country, according
to FBI spokesman Paul Miller.
Jane Flener, Associate Director of
Public Services at the Graduate
Library, said that less than 20 of the
books had been stolen from the Univer-
sity. She described the books as mainly
"esoteric," containing rare maps and
drawings.I
Flener said it is difficult for a large
library such as the Graduate Library to
prevent thefts. The library lacks the
resources to conduct frequent inven-
tories, and the large flow of patrons
restricts scrutiny of suspicious in-
dividuals, she said.
THE UNIVERSITY has had only one
other major problem with thefts in past
years Flener said, although books often
disappear mysteriously. The previous
thief was arrested and the books

recovered after they were found at an
Ann Arbor book store. /
Shinn was arrested by FBI agents
Dec. 16, 1981 in Allentown, Pa., after a
Muhlenberg College librarian
recognized him from a picture that was
distributed in a warning circular. The
stolen books were discovered in a
Bethlehem locker that was registered
to Shinn.
Shinn is appealing the conviction on
the grounds that the search warrant
used by the FBI to confiscate the books $
was invalid. Judge Huylett ruled
earlier in the case that the warrant was
valid.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Samuel For-
stein, said that Shinn had a criminal
record that began at age 14, and he had
been convicted previously for forgery
and burglary, he said.
Flener said that the Unviersity has put
in a claim for their stolen books, but
added that she does not know when they
will be returned.

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
At a protest outside yesterday's Regents' meeting, City Council member Lowell Peterson condemns the University
administration for making Ann Arbor "an upper-class, lily-white, trickle-down city.".
Regents approve record budget

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(Continued from Page) 1
"exquisitely dependent on the state
legislature making good on its paymen-
ts."
AS IT IS, the University has lost
about $1 million in interest because of
the delayed appropriations, according
to Shapiro. Over the past four years,
state appropriations have declined
about 25 percent when adjusted for in-
flation, he added.
REGENT VARNER expressed con-
cern that dramatic hikes in tuition to of-
fset declines in state aid may restrict
gentry to the University for poorer
students.
"The record of admissions has read
some warning signs that indicate there
may be a shift of more students from
"wealthier communities (coming
here)," Frye said, agreeing with Var-
tner.
' Varner also expressed concerns
about the 13 percent increase in defense
0 esearch spending last year.

Charles Overberger, vice-president
for research, said that since the nearby
Willow Run laboratories were sold, the
amount of classified research has fallen
to the point where it was only $1 million
of the $5.2 million spent last year.
OVERBERGER also pointed out that
defense spending was only 4 percent of
last year's research expenditures, but
Regent Sarah Power (D-Ann Arbor)
pressed for an example of what kind of
research is being done, "for the
record."
In answer to Power, Assistant Dean
for Research Development Alan Price
said the University received a $3.6
million grant over the summer to do
robot and computer research for the
Air Force.
Critics of the University's ventures
into such research say it is being used
for automated weapons systems.
At the public-comments session in the
Union's Anderson Room, which
folloWed the regular meeting, that 4

percent defense research figure made
many students militant themselves.
"TUITION IS going up, financial aid
is going down, and the Pentagon is
taking over," said Tom Marx, an LSA
senior.
Regent Varner also expressed con-
cern over the University's present
academic prominence. She said she
was "a little shocked, and somewhat
disappointed" to read a recent survey
in the Chronicle of Higher Education
which said the faculty quality of six
University departments was not in the
top 10 in the nation. Only one of the
departments, math, was rated in the
top 20.
President Shapiro said University
executive officers have been discussing
the survey, and "there is basic truth in
what they (the statistics) show."

i

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INFORMATION ON ADMISSIONS, PRE-LAW
COURSES, CAREER OPPORTUNITIES, AND
MORE.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20
2pm to5:30pm
Mich. League Ballroom

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Students
Continued from Page 1)
resources, and education,
are presently under review
budget cuts.
School of Natural Resou
Scott Pearson said his schc
sit back like (the) geogra
tment)" and accept the bud
CITY COUNCIL mem
Peterson drew applause bl
the view of a concerned
citizen: "Who is this Univ
to serve?" he asked. "I
.having a breeding grou
porates and elitists, but not
money. Ann Arbor will b
and more of an upper clas
trickle-down city."
-;Amy Moore, MSA presi
the subdued group by sayin
Omean nothing. We're. w
bolstering of money-makin
emphasis has been taken
education and turned to pro
dStudents in the thin audi
-io agree with the spea
-University should be direo
than technology. It must
creative and non-destructi
of life," said senior-Alan
computer science major.
NATURAL Resources
Brewbaker said he feare
targeted schools. "We haA

attack redirection
light just how important diversity in
all of which school is. They'll end up with an upper
for possible class, white, technological university,"
he said.
rces student After student leaders had tried to ex-
ool "will not cite the crowd, the rally moved to the
phy (depar- Regents' meeting in the administation
Iget cuts. building. The uninvited guests filled
ber Lowell the meeting room and sat quietly as the
y presenting Regents continued their business. The
Ann Arbor meeting then moved to a larger room in
ersity going the Michigan Union, and the Regents
don't mind entertained public comments..
Ind for cor-
with my tax,
ecome more .7
s, lily-white,
dent, roused ACdof SJ30#SK4Mr '
g, "Students
ng units. The FACTORYCLOSEOUT
away from
fece seemed Swimwear
kers. "TheF
cted to more Fotw a
pursue theDp e
onal aspectsyW
Wheatley, a
406 East Liberty
2 blocks off State Street
senior Lee
d losing the f63-677

Pre-Professional
Career Planning & Placement

Services
A Unit of
Student Services

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