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October 15, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-15

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Page 2-Friday, October 15, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Shamir: Lebanese
must provide security
WASHINGTON (AP)- Israel's southern Lebanon than Washington
foreign minister, Yitzhak Shamir, met wants, said one State Department of-
yesterday with Secretary of State ficial.
George Shultz to push Israel's demand "We don't think it's quick enough,"
that Lebanon agree in writing to said the official, who asked not to be
guarantee the safety of Israel's nor- identified.
thern border. However, he said the administration
The Israelis have made such an probably could give in to Israel's
agreement a requirement for with- demand that the Lebanese ar-
drawing their troops from southern my-rather than a U.N. peacekeeping
Lebanon. force-provide security along the
However, the initial response of some Lebanese side of the border with Israel.
Reagan administration officials-prior Washington has favored the U.N. for-
to Shamir's visit-is that the plan would ce but probably won't insist if Israel is
mean a longer Israeli presence in against it, the official said.
300 show for art school

(Continued from Page 1)
showing slides as he spoke, stressed the
importance of non-art school students
being able to take art school classes.
"Art education is vital. Art is alive
because it is a part of us," said Hamel,
who has taken nine art school courses.
Joel Issacson, chairman of the
history of art department, described
the art school as a "lean, solid, viable
enterprise that deserves solid support."
The School of Art integrates
beautifully into the University," Issac-
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son said. "The arts should not be pin-
ned down. They need the environment
we provide at the University of
Michigan."
Barry Ganoe of the Toledo Museum
of Art spoke on the close relationship
between the museum's education
program and the school's graduate
program.
According to Ganoe, the museum
hires graduate students part-time to
help teach classes. "Of all the schools
in the region, the University of
Michigan trains graduate students
much more thoroughly," he said.
"I feel the diminishment (of the
school) would be a real loss," Ganoe
said. "The potential that there might
not be a School of Art in the future to me
is unconceivable."

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IN BRIEF
Complied from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Li'1 Ronnie on jobless lines 4
WASHINGTON- President and Mrs. Reagan offered financial help to
their son Ronald, who is drawing unemployment pay, but the out-of-work
ballet dancer prefers to be independent, a White House spokesman said
yesterday.
The White House said it wasn't the first time. Ronald Prescott Reagan, 23,
has collected two or three unemployment checks since he was laid off Oct. 1
by the Joffrey Ballet company, said Reagan spokesman Larry Speakes.
Young Reagan was photographed at the state Unemployment Office at six-
th Avenue and 20th Street in Manhattan, wehre the out-of-work go to register
for unemployment benefits of $125 a week.
In the theatrical world, where intervals of idleness or layoffs are common,
performers normally apply for and receive unemployment benefits, which
are discontinued when they return to work.
Dems criticize CIA activities
WASHINGTON- The former deputy CIA director, Bobby Inman, says
Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee are protesting elements of
the Reagan administration's high-priority drive to expand covert actions
abroad.
Inman said this dispute was the underlying reason the committee voted
along party lines last month to issue a staff report criticizing U.S. intelligen-
ce-gathering in Central America.
Committee officials promptly rejected Inman's claim that disputes over
covert action colored the report, saying the staff members who wrote the
critique were not even involved in reviewing covert activities.
Inman said the committee Democrats have written letters to President
Reagan critical of CIA covert actions. He said he believed some of those let-
ters were critical of actions in Central America. Published reports have said
Reagan approved a covert action plan for Central America last fall.
Toxic shock syndrome linked
to prolonged diaphragm use
BUFFALO, N.Y. - A new study suggests prolonged retention of the
diaphragm for birth control may increase the risk of developing toxic shock
syndrome, the sometimes-fatal ilness previously linked to tampon use.
The study, headed by Dr. Elizabeth Baehler of the State University of New
York at Buffalo, found that extra-long use of the diaphragm in the vagina in-
creased overgrowth in the cervix and vagina of staphylococcus aureus, the
bacteria implicated in the disease.
Despite increases in the bacterial colonies, researchers said none of the
women developed symptoms of toxic shock syndrome.
Salvadoran army pushes north
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador- The government sent 5,000 troops backed
by artillery, fighter-bombers and helicopter gunships into northern El
Salvador yesterday to counterattack the strongest guerrilla drive in six
months.
Stiff guerrilla resistance was reported and a national guard commander in
northern Chalatenango province, where the operation was concentrated,
reported government casualties were heavy.
The guerrilla assaults this week constitute the strongest and best coor-
dinated operation since their unsuccessful effort to disrupt March 28 elec-
tions for a Constituent Assembly.
Military authorities said earlier that at least 33 soldiers and 34 guerrillas
were killed, and more than 100 people, most of them guerrillas, were woun-
ded.
The army's three U.S.-trained battalions were sent into Chalatenango
province with other ground forces. Four American-made A-37 "Dragonfly"
fighter-bombers were bombing and strafing rebel positions at Las Vueltas,
said the commander.
Reagan to combat drug traffic
WASHINGTON- President Reagan vowed yesterday to "end the drug
menace and cripple organized crime" with a $200million program that will
blanket the nation with federal narcotics task forces.
The president, criticized in Congress last year for scaling back the fight
against drug traffickers, said the government will hire up to 1,200 more
federal agents and investigators to form a dozen task forces.
Administration officials saidl the drug enforcement task forces will try to
infiltrate drug rings, concentrating on long-range investigations aimed at
breaking up networks rather than street pushers. They will be modeled after
the task force, headed by Vice President George Bush, that was formed to
combat the drug trade in southern Florida.
More jobless claim benefits
WASHINGTON- Despite President Reagan's claim that the nation is
"recovery-bound," another 695,000 Americans filed first-time claims for
unemployment benefits in the week ending Oct. 2, the Labor Department
reported yesterday.
It was the second-highest filing binge since the current recession began in
the late summer of 1981, falling 8,000 claims short of the record 703,000 initial
pleas for government relief that were filed in the week ending Sept. 18.
The jobless benefit claims came on the eve of a new series of hearings on
unemployment by Congress's Joint Economic Committee and followed

Reagan's acknowledgement Wednesday night to a national television
audience that jobs were the dark cloud in an improving economic picture.
"Unemployment is the problem uppermost on many people's minds,"
Reagan said in his address. "Getting Americans back to work is an urgent
priority for all of us, and especially for this administration."

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pi

.Vol. XCIII, No. 32
Friday, October 15, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI. 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375t; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

S

TAC
b and
ical So
Price in
ductory
ng Pla

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Editor-in-chief .....................DAVID MEYER
Managing Editor. .. PAMELA KRAMER
News Editor................... ANDREW CHAPMAN
Student Affairs Editor...........ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor .................. MARK GINDIN
Opinion Page Editors . . .. .. JULIE HINDS
CHARLES THOMSON
Arts Mogozine Editors ..........RICHARD CAMPBELL
Associate Arts/Magazrne Editor .........BEN TICHO
Sports Editor....................BOB WOJNOWSKI
Associate Sports Editors ............ . .BARB BARKER
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK
Photography Editor....:.............. BRIAN MASCK

Laura Clark, Richard Demok, Jim Dworman. Dbvid
Forman, Chris Gerbasi. Poul Helgren. Matt Henehan.
Chuck Joffe. Steve Kamen. Robin Kopilnick. Doug
Levy. Mike McGraw. Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman.
Jeff Quicksilver. Jim Thompson. Karl Wheatley, Chris
Wilson. Chuck Whitman E
BUSINESS
Business Manager .JOSEPH G. BRODA
Sales Manager................KATHRYN HENDRICK
Display Manager. ................... ANN SACHAR
Finance Manager ............ SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV
Assistant Display Manager.........PAMELA GOULD
Operations/National Manager ...LINDSAY BRAY
Circulation Manager...................KIM WOOD
Sales Coordinator............E. ANDREW PETERSEN
Classified Manager ........PAM GILLERY

"We put the 'care'
back in eyecare."

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