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October 12, 1982 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-12

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 12, 1982-Page 5
Three Europeans win Nobel
with medical breakthrough

From AP and UPI
BOSTON -Two Swedes and an English-
$ man shared the Nobel Prize for Medicine
yesterday for their research into a group of
a body chemicals that affect human ills
ranging from arthritis and high blood
pressure to asthma and painful men-
struation.
Sweden's Sune Bergstrom, 66, and Bengt
Samuelsson, 48, and Britain's Dr. John
,y~.' 'Vane, 55, shared the $158,000 prize for their
" groundbreaking research involving a wide-
ranging family of body substances known as
" prostaglandins.
Prostaglandins were discovered in the
early 1930s, but only in the 1960s did scien-
tists learn how to make modified versions,
called analogues, that could be used to
AP Photo treat specific disorders.
THE CHEMICALS are now the subject of
The 1982 Nobel Prize winners for Medicine or Physiology toast each other with champagne. They are from intense study, and about 5,000 scientific ar-
left to right, Bengt Samuelsson, M.D., Sune Bergstrom, M.D., and John Vane, F.R.S. tides about them are published each year.
'Commission begins probe
into massacre in Beirut -

Among potential uses for the substances
are treating heart attacks, high blood
pressure, asthma, ulcers and blocked nasal
passages., #
"It's certainly most gratifying that your
colleagues value the work that you have
been fighting with for the past 35 years,"
said Bergstrom, 66, who is sometimes called
the father of prostaglandin chemistry.
IN RECENT years, related research has
come to show the effect of aspirin in preven-
ting heart attacks. For some years, anti-
prostaglandin drugs also have been used to
reduce the debilitating pain of arthritis.
One form of prostaglandin called throm-
baxane, is released by blood cells called
platelets and helps blood to clot. But at the
same time, another form of the chemical,
called prostacyclin, is dispensed by blood
vessel walls and has the opposite effect - it
prevents clots from forming.
Unitl 1976, Vane said from his Boston hotel

room, scientists were unaware of "the
strong effects of prostacyclin" manufac-
tured by the walls of arteries to keep them
clean.
Charles Sweeley, chairman of the
biochemistry department at Michigan State
University worked with prize winner
Samuelsson at East Lansing in 1970 on an
analytical method that greatly facilitated
further research on prostaglandins.
Samuelsson was a visiting professor at
MSU from January to June 1970. He and
Sweeley collaborated on a paper dealing
with analysis of prostaglandins in blood. ..
Up to this year, Americans have
dominated the science awards, with 57 win-
ners in medicine alone. Britain was second,
with 19 of the 132 laureates since the first
prize was awarded in 1901.
Nobel prizes are given annually fo
medicine, chemistry, physics, economics;:
literature and peace.

Hussein, Arafat have
'identical viewpoints'

From AP and UPI
0 TEL AVIV, Israel - A three-man
ommission yesterday opened its con-
troversial inquiry into the massacre of
Palestinian refugees in Beirut, a probe
whose outcome could determine the
fate of Prime Minster Menachem
Begin's government.
The investigation, which the gover-
nment agreed to under intense pressure
from critics at home and abroad, is
Israel's most important since the
inquiry into the initial setbacks in the
Iom Kippur War of 1973. That probe
xonerated the government of Golda
Meir, but she retired soon afterward.
WORKERS installed iron bars on the
windows of a building on the Givat Ram
Campus of Hebrew University, where
the panel headed byCheif Justice Yit-
zhak Kahan is to conduct its work. the
inquiry was expected to take several
months. Some of the hearings will be
open to the public.

In advertisements in all Israeli
newspapers, on radio and television,
Israelis were urged to step forward
with information about the massacre
by right-wing Christian Lebanese
Phalangists last month at the Chatila
and Sabra refugee camps.
Red Cross officials found 337 bodies
in the camps. Although it is not likely the
bodies of many of the victims ever will
be recovered, Lebanese officials have
estimated the actual death toll at about
1,500.,
NEWSPAPER reports have said
Begin and Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon will be called to testify. Both
men have said they will accept the
commission's findings.
"All ranks of the Israeli Defense For-
ces may apply to the commission
without obtaining prior permission
from their commanding officers," the
appeal said.
Initially opposed to a full state
inquiry, Begin later relented. His
Cabinet Sept 28 decided to establish an
ce'
microwave oven, a computer terminal,
4 IBM typewriters, and a refrigerator,
police said.
A small fire was set and a safe was
tampered within a projection room on
the second floor of Lorch Hall last
Friday afternoon, police said. The
suspect broke into the building at about
3 p.m. and set fire to a wooden chair.
There was no fire damage in the room.
The incident is currently under in-
vestigation, Fire Department officials
said.
A typewriter was stolen early Friday
morning from a locked office in the
School of Education Building, police
said. The method of entry is still
unknown. -GREG BR USSTAR

inquiry board with full subpoena
powers of both documents and wit-
nesses.
Meanwhile, at the two refugee camps
where the massacres occured,
Lebanese soldiers conducted searches
for guns and tore down shacks which
had been built without permits.
Panicked camp residents reported
men in civilian clothes had entered the
camps overnight, leading away several
people. Lebanese paramilitary
security forces attempting to calm the
residents said the men were plain-
clothes policemen, and that no further
camp seaches would be allowed by
people out of uniform. There was no ex-
planation for the searches being con-
ducted after nightfall.
As the army searched the two camps
where hundreds of Palestinian refugees
were massacred last month, Western
diplomats reported that a new con-
tingent of 400 Italian troops will be sent
to Lebanon on Wednesday to join a
multinational peacekeeping force.
That would bolster the American,
French and Italian peacekeeping force
to 4,200 men. the Lebanese government
requested the force after the massacre
of hundreds of Palestinian refugees in
Sabra and Chatilla Sept. 16-18.
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From United Press International
Jordan's King Hussein and PLO
leader Yasser Arafat met with
"frankness, brotherhood, and under-
standing" yesterday and shared "iden-
tical viewpoints" in the talks on a
federation between displaced
Palestinians and Jordan.
According to state-run Amman radio,
Badran said Hussein and Arafat share
"identical viewpoints toward the major
issue of the fate of both our peoples,
members of the same family."
ARAFAT, visiting Palestinian
fighters evacuated to Jordan under the
cease-fire agreement with Israel,
echoed the optimistic tone.
"The Palestinians and Jordanians
have always been brothers in blood," he
told the Badr brigades of the Palestine

Liberation Army. "We are seeking to
coordinate the future steps of our.,
struggles, which will not stop until the
Palestinian flag is flown over
Jerusalem."
A spokesman for Syrian President
Hafez Assad, however, charged in an.
interview that Arafat was not
authorized to speak for the
Palestinians.

Hussein
... meeting with Arafat

Woman jogger attacked
A 26-year-old Ann Arbor woman was
*ttacked Friday at about 7 p.m. while
jogging on the 2300 block of Fuller, just
east of Oakway, police said yesterday:
An. unidentified man approached her
from behind, tackled her, and attem-
pted to rip her clothing off. A woman
from Detroit was passing in a car and
stopped to aid the victim. The attacker
then walked away from the scene and
has not been apprehended.
Leather heist
Leather goods valued at $10,750 were
stolen from ,the Suwanne Springs
Lather Co., 210 S. Main, Friday night,
police said. The suspect forced a win-
dow and stole several coats, briefcases,
vests, and shoes.
Sgt. Pepper's looted
Meat, cigarettes, and $6,000 in cash
were stolen from Sgt. Pepper's grocery
store, 1028 E. University, early Thur-
Aday morning, police said. The thief
'forced the rear door to gain entry.
Three 'U' building
break-ins
More than $4,560 in equipment was
stolen Thursday night from the Univer-
sity Urban Tech Environment office,
506 E. Liberty. The thief took a
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