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September 09, 1982 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-09

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4

Page 16.8--Thursday, September 9, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Stalking the college

(Continued from Page 4)
often poorly defined) expectations. It
hides beneath hidden rocks and around
strange corners.
THE FIRST basic requirement is an
openness to the new and unfamiliar.

and present customs and attitudes,
willing to test one's choice of
profession, academic field, ethics,
politics, social activities, even religion.
The University is a big place, big
enough for everyone to carve their own

"One must be willing . . . to test one's choice of
profession, academic field, ethics, politics, social
activities, even religion."

Neither hard work and strict discipline
nor amiability and active social in-
volvement guarantee much besides
decent grades and a bunch of people to
go out with on weekends. Somehow,
that didn't quite fit my idea of the
college experience.
One must be willing to question (if not
become openly dissatisfied with) past

niche, offers a tremendous diversity of
lifestyles. Some important personal
decisions have to be made in college
(even as a freshman), and if you're too
quick, you're going to miss out.
FOR ME, mild dissatisfaction set in
early in my second term. With all the
snow and cold and three months of
school still ahead, those can be pretty

xperience
down months in Ann Arbor. Maybe it
was just what college students fear
most: boredom. Or maybe it was the
realization that you can't get by just
doing the routine or expected. Nobody's
going to give you your experience; it's
not a formula or a schedule to be
followed, as are your course
requirements. You've got to seek it
yourself.
Of course, you'll get assistance.
There arehundreds of clubs and cliques
and ideologies out there just dying
(literally) for new membership, ready
and willing to ease your way into the
fold. Most freshpeople I knew flitted
back and forth in the neon lights of
various groups, Greeks, and other
distractions before they settled down to
something they found worthwhile.
Anyhow, I managed to emerge from
my first year older, inestimably wiser,
and still only a mediocre frisbee player.
I found myself doing new, exciting
things and things which I had expected
I would be doing (and was expected to
do, like studying) but for vastly dif-
ferent reasons than those with which I
arrived on campus last fall. I guess I
can't wish much more for anyone else,
as a freshperson and beyond.
CRDIISP has
poor image
continued from Page >1
"to make registration as comfortable
as possible for the student." So far,
most University officials agree the
seven-year-old system is far superior to
its predecessor.
Entering freshmen who register
during summer orientation sessions or
just before classes start often don't
realize that the schedule they receive at
CRISP the first time around is carved
only in the computer's memory cell, not
in stone.
Students have three weeks after a
term starts to drop or add courses, or
even rearrange an entire schedule,
without penalty. In addition, a student
can try to squeeze in closed courses if
he or she can find a sympathetic in-
structor who will sign an override slip.
t-

Daily Photo by DOUG McMAHON
THE $3.1 MILLION Michigan Alumni Center, scheduled to be completed this fall, will provide office space, meeting
rooms, and visibility for the University's alumni association.
Famous names have walked the Diag

(Continued from Page 5)
Norman, and Max Gail, the regular-guy
sergeant on "Barney Miller."
JAZZ MUSICIAN Bob James is a
Michigan alumnus, as are countless
classical orchestra members. In
Hollywood, Michigan is represented by
Lawrence Kasdan, who penned such
entertainment epics as Raiders of the
Lost Ark and The Empire Strikes Back.
Superman II was written by Michigan
grads David and Leslie Newman.
Among the many famous former
Michigan athietes are Tom Harmon,
George Sisler, Bill Freehan, Rudy
Tomjanovich, Cazzie and Campy
Russell, Janet Guthrie, Micki King

Hogue, and most recently, Butch
Woolfolk, the number one draft pick of
the New York Giants.
President Ford is joined on the list of
famous alumni politicians by out-going
Michigan Governor William Milliken
and former Michigan Governor G.
Mennen (Soapy) Williams. Former
Michigan Senator Robert Griffin and
present Kansas Senator Nancy
Kassenbaum graduated from the
University, and Tom Hayden, husband
of Jane Fonda and one of the founders
of the 60's campus group Students for a
Democratic Society, first began to stir
things up here.

THE UNIVERSITY HAS contributed
more than its share of well-known
writers including Arthur Miller, Ross-
McDonald, Gael Greene, Judith Guest,
and Marge Piercy.
Michigan television journalists in-
clude the combative Mike Wallace of 60
Minutes, Bill Fleming, and Burt Bend
jamin, producer of the CBS Evenin.
News.
The corner of East and South Univer-
sity Streets, near the West Engineering
Arch, is named for astronauts Ed White
and James McDivitt. Jack Lousma;
who flew the Space Shuttle last spring;.'
is the latest University graduate to soar
into space.

+-ยง t

'U' can't meet black enrollment goal

F4

(Continued from Page 3)
Although financial support for
graduate students is a part of Frye's
five-year plan, more money for
minorities specifically is not. Such a
commitment would be possible, Frye
says, but it would require "a large part
of the University's budget.. . to pay the
high out-of-state tuition rates."
Another factor in the attrition
problem, according to many observers,
is the social climate at the University.
Black students "are being placed in a
situation where the environment is
foreign. And when that occurs, they
begin to feel isolated," says Powell.
ALLEN CALLS those who leave
because they can't cope with the
isolation "tragic cases."
Goodman says he sees "a lot of ten-
sion in the dorms where black students

and white students live together."
And Robinson says that "significant
numbers of (black) students who leave
here do it for reasons other than
academic."
Johnson agrees that the social factor
is a problem, but adds, "Black students
are just as capable of handling those
problems as anyone else. I would argue
that that is the least factor in attrition."
SOME OFFICIALS emphasize that
the faculty must become more respon-
sive to the problems of minority studen-
ts in order to overcome the attrition
problem.
Former CULS director Russ says
that faculty members do not see the
problems minority students may have
in certain basic academic areas. The
faculty is not willing to approach a
student having difficulties, he says.

f

"Professors don't see that as their-
primary work. Supposedly students
who are brought in can stand the rigors
of academic life," Russ says.
"WHATEVER strategy is used to cut
attrition rates has to involve direct
faculty involvement," Johnson says.
He suggests that faculty efforts in this
area be rewarded in some way.
Many observers believe larger num
bers of black faculty would improve th
atmosphere for black students.
More blacks on the faculty would
have a two-fold benefit for the Univer-
sity, says Prof. Allen. It would give
black students a better chance to "con
nect up" with professors and give
others on campus a better opportunity
"to become sensitive to black
problems."
Another program for addressing the
problem-one that has been discussed
for many years but never implemen
ted-is a centralization of minority.
programs. Presently, schools"and
colleges are responsible for ad-
ministering their own programs. Such-a
system results in large discrepancies in
quality due to differences in funding
and interest on the part of the various
schools, according to Johnson.
"I don't ever see a time when schools
and colleges do not have a role in the
retention and recruitment of (minorit
students). But can we afford in thes
times the multiplicity of services we
have?" asks Johnson.

JUST WHAT YOU DON'T EXPECT
* FILM CO-OP (3 films a week this Fall, including
Casablanca, Annie Hall, 2001 Space
Odyssey, Breaker Morant, Paper Chase
---and free popcorn)
* QUIET EVENING STUDY SPACE (bottomless
coffee pot until I am )
* COUNSELING (personal & academic)
* IM SPORTS
* DARK ROOM
* PROJECT OUTREACH, INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES
JUST WHAT YOU DO EXPECT
* ISRAELI DANCING
* JEWISH STUDIES CLASSES
STUDENT UJA CAMPAIGN
* SHABBAT SERVICES & DINNERS
* UNION OF STUDENTS FOR ISRAEL
* KOSHER CO-OP, DINNERS & DELIS
And mostly,what you make of it.
AND YOU THOUGHT THAT HILLEL
WAS JUST FOR
HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES?

What is a
RUSH SLIP?

University Health Service
HEALTH CARE FOR THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY
Huron Ave

207 Fletcher

Ave.

I I -m I

=I

Burton
Tower

4-)

* UHS

North University Ave.
The University of Michigan provides on the central campus a health care facility funded by student
fees. Enrolled students are entitled to care throughout each semester at no cost in many of the
clinics and departments of the University Health Service (UHS).

SERVICES (at UHS only) COST
Medical Clinics (appointment ............ NONE
AND "urgent care" visits)
Nursing and Treatment Centers ....... NONE
Gynecology/Contraception Clinic .....NONE
(fees for actual prescribed
contraceptives)
Allergy Clinic.....................NONE
(fees for Antigen)
Immunization Clinic ................. NONE
Specialty Clinics: Dermatology, ....... NONE
Neurology, Ear Nose and Throat
(ENT), & Orthopedics (Medical
Clinic referrals required)
Eye Care Clinic (including..................Fees
contact lens fittings)
Nutrition Counseling (many...............Fees
aspects are at no charge)
Psychiatric Counseling .................Fees
Health Education (call 763-1320..........NONE
for program offerings and
educational materials)
Infirmary Care ...................... NONE

UHS HOURS
September-April
Monday-Friday.............8:00 am-5:00 pm
5:00 pm-9:00 pm*
Saturday..............8:00 am-12:00 noon
12:00 noon-6:00 pm*
Sunday.................10:00 am-6:00 pm*
*Full staff and services are not avadable during these
hours; patients with non-urgent problems may be asked
to schedule an appointment to return the next day
IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS

INFO HOTLINE..........
NURSING CENTER, ............ .
(September-April: 24 hour
telephone medical assistance)
Appointment Scheduling .
Gynecology Appointment

.........764-8320
763-4511
..........764-8325
7A.1-A'l7A

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