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October 08, 1982 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-08

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 8, 1982-Page 9
Swedes expand hunt Mrn
for suspicious sub 1.00 TUESDAYS

(Continued from Page 1Y
against the moving object."
HE REFUSED to elaborate and
would not answer questions.
Another naval spokesman said the
trapped vessel might have made a run
for it, and that two more depth charges
were fired around 5 p.m. (noon EDT)
close to the northern exit of Hors Bay.
"It could also mean that a second sub
had approached the area," Capt. Cay

Holmberg, a veteran anti-submarine
warfare specialist said.
HE WOULD not disclose whether the
moving object was discovered, by
sonar contact, just inside or outside the
area sealed off by Swedish naval units.
Holmberg said the depth charges
were dropped as close as 15 yards to the
sub, indicating that direct damage
could not be ruled out.

The Schlitz Super Can, a giant facsimile of the more modest beer can, carrened through the streets of Ann Arbor
yesterday in preparation for tomorrow's big game. Driver Patrick Roche said the Super Can is "a Go Blue beer can," a
sure sign that Schlitz's good taste carries over to football teams.
Race relations at 'U'

*the pits', new book claims

(Continued from Page I,
"The black students (here) lack a'
kultural atmosphere both in the
University and in town," he said. "Most
(black students) don't find Dooley's in-
teresting."
"MANY (BLACKS) are unhappy,"
said Clarence Stone, who serves on the
Michigan Student Assembly as vice
president for minority affairs. "Of 1,700
black students in 1981, '578 did not
return."
Stone blamed both declining Univer-
sity financial aid to black students and
eampus tension between the races as
the main reasons why so many blacks
ave left the University.
University administrators are quick
to concede that there is room for im-
*rovement in campus race relations.
,Susan McClanahan, coordinator of the
University's affirmative action
programs, said the guide's review of
4Michigan is "a balanced view of what
itis like here." -
George Goodman, director of the
X.U iversity's Opportunity Program,
said yesterday that the administration
recognizes that race relations are a
,serious problem on campus and has
been working to improve them for
*many years through programs like his.
THE University ranked worse than
oalmost all of the other 113 schools in-
;eluded in the college guide, which was
put together by Brown University Prof.
(Berry Beckham.
%i The schools were rated according to
the responses of five black students
surveyed at each college, Beckham ex-
plained. That procedure has led some
college administrators outside Ann Ar-
bor ,to criticize the findings as
uitepresentative of most students.
Black students are "disenchanted
and unhappy" at the University of
Arizona, according to the guide. And it
quotes a black student at UCLA as
saying there is "an atmosphere of de
facto segregation . . . on campus."
But it gives rave 'notices to the
University of Iowa, and to Oberlin
College, saying the small Ohio liberal
arts school "certainly has provided a
welcome and comfortable environment
6or most of its black students." And
tiny, selective Wesleyan University in
Middletown, Conn., is called "tops" for
black students.
THE BOOK focuses on prestigious,
predominantly white schools, but also
includes state universities and about a
dozen historically black institutions.
According to government figures,
about 1.1 million of the nation's 12
million college students are black.
0 The book provides statistics on each
college, including tuition, the number of
black students and faculty members,
and the average amount of financial aid
students can expect. Those are followed
by two- to three-page essays which
evaluate the quality and quantity of
black counseling and support services,
black-white relations on campus and in
the surrounding community, and the
party and social scene blacks can ex-
pect.
0 The writing was done by Brown
University students, both whites and
blacks, says Beckham, although he
says he wrote several profiles himself.
THE PRAISE for many schools was
as lavish as the criticism for others in

the guide, and Beckham said the pic-
ture the book provides of the black
mood on American campuses is by no
means all bleak.
"I think generally black students are
fairly happy, certainly compared with
past years. And I see instances of more
maturity," he said.
As an example of that maturity, he
cited a student quoted in.the generally
favorable profile of Case Western
Reserve University in Cleveland: "It
was a hard adjustment for me, but I
made it after about one year.
Sometimes the black jokes and the
financial pressures became un-
bearable. But I had to keep in mind I
wanted an education .. ..
Beckham said his book also shows
that many black students believe "it is
important to go to predominantly white
schools to learn about another culture.
And it's important to interract with
white people."
On the negative side, Beckham's
book documents a scarcity of black
faculty, even at an Ivy League school
like Harvard, where 12 out of 730
faculty members are black.
Copies of individual campus profiles
were mailed by the author this week to
each campus listed in the guidebook.
Reaction is 'ranging from praise for the
book's accuracy and fairness, to fury.
The Associated Press filed a
report for this story.
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