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October 06, 1982 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-06

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See Editorial, Page 4

\'. '

Ninety-three Years of Editorial Freedom

?EtaiIu

Hazy lazy
Mostly hazy today with short bursts
of sunshine and a high in the upper
?0s.

M Vol. XCIII, No. 24

Copyright 1982, The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, October 6, 1982

Ten Cents

Ten Pages

W

,..

State u
By BILL SPINDLE
The University's extension service was the
first to go when the budget pinch hit. When
* things got even tighter, the geography depar-
tment was sacrificed to help keep the rest of the
University above water. Now the Institute for
the Study of Mental Retardation and Related
Disabilities may be on the road to elimination.
But what about other universities in the
state? What cuts are they making to survive
the financial environment the state's lieutenant
governor called "the economy of the shrinking
pie?"
LAST APRIL, as the snow melted around
Northern Michigan University, the board of
governors faced the fact that harsh economic
times had arrived.

niversities cut

budgets to survive

Faced with several years of declining state
aid, enrollment declines of nearly 500 students,
and Michigan's sluggish economy, the Board of
Governors at NMU officially resolved that
there was a "financial emergency" at their
university.
Late last month NMU administrators sent
out layoff notices to 19 professors who were
tenured or on their way to being so.
THE ONLY way administrators could im-
mediately balance the instructional budget was
to ask unions to accept a pay freeze for this
year, said Paul Soumi, communications direc-
tor for NMU.
"They (unions) all had a choice of taking
freezes or having layoffs," Soumi said.
The bargaining unit for the professors, the

American Association of University Professors
(AAUP), claimed that raises were a part of
their contract with the university and refused
to accept the freeze, said local AAUP President
John Kiltinen.
KILTINEN called the layoff notices a.
"pressure tactic" to force salary concessions.
While professors and administrators say
negotiations are continuing, they appear to be
deadlocked. The AAUP claims cuts could be
made in other places, and administrators say
everything else that can be cut has been.
Should tenured faculty members actually be
laid off at Northern, the rest of the schools in
the state, including this University, will be
watching. Nationally, cases of laid-off faculty
suing institutions have resulted in controver-

sialand contradictory decisions. But at NMU,
no one has taken legal action as of yet.
FOR MICHIGAN State University, the
problems arrived earlier than at NMU.
Early in 1980, Gov. William Milliken was op-
timistically hinting about giving universities
five to seven percent more money in 1981 than
they received the year before. By the end of the
year, however, the governor had cut the '81
payments to five to seven percent below the
previous year.
"MSU was one of the schools hardest hit.
"We had a budget shortfall determined to be
serious and ongoing in nature," said Robert
Lockhart, director of MSU's budget office. The
MSU Board of Regents adopted a statement of
"fiscal crisis" when they made the cuts to

relieve the problem.
IN A DESPERATE situation, Michigan State
chose to eliminate its nursing school, its
College of Urban Development, and a college of
the physical sciences.
Those plans, however, didn't work out per-
fectly for the MSU administration. After 300
demonstrators marched around the ad-
ministration building, and other opposition to
the cuts surfaced, the board of governors
decided against eliminating the nursing school,
although they cut deeply into its budget.
The early lesson of declining state support
which every other school in the state is now
learning has not been forgotten at MSU.
See STATE, Page 2

NR school's
backers pack

11

heaing
a
$y JIM SPARKS A
In their last chance to defend the TI
School of Natural Resources, 300 people
Curnedout at Rackham Auditorium last f
night for a second public hearing on the e
school's fate. P
Speakers at the meeting, which ran m
four hours, twice as long as scheduled,
expressed their dismay at the N
possibility of cuts in the school's budget, i]
or its possible closure. r
THE NEARLY 40 faculty, students, t
alumni and others who spoke em- t
phasized the school's nationally and in-
ternationally acclaimed reputation. h;
Some criticized the review process it- s
self and urged budget increases, not f
reductions.
The review process could cultivate an
unhealthy atmosphere in the University
by pitting faculty members against w
each other, said Raphael Ezekiel,

ssociate psychology professor and
Ann Arbor City Councilmember (D-
rhird Ward).
"In these high stress situations, the
aculty has to rush together to save the
nterprise, and not get into a com-
petitive situation," he told the six-
member review panel.
EZEKIEL charged that the cuts are
being made for the purpose of investing
n robotics, business and defense
esearch and that the review commit-
ee may unwittingly be supporting
hese goals.
"If you take literally the charges you
have been given, and like good, respon-
ible, faceless people, carry out your
unction, what you really will be doing
will be to collaborate with the Ad-
ministration's goals," he said.
The Budget Priorities Committee,
which began reviewing the school in
See SCHOOL'S, Page 5

Members of the Rowing Club had some trouble with their rowing tank on the
Diag yesterday. After an Ann Arbor fireman filled the tank (top left), mem-
bers of the club noticed a slow leak (bottom left). The leak turned into a lake
(above), but the water level was a bit too low for rowing.

MSA okays PIRGIM funding plan

By ROB FRANK
The Michigan Student Assembly last
night endorsed efforts by the Public In-
terest Research Group in Michigan
(PIRGIM) to change thenmanner in
which students contribute to the
research group.
If implemented, the new system
would have students pay the $2
PIRGIM fee on their tuition bill, then
have it refunded if they decided not to
contribute to the organization.
THE STUDENT government body
also voted to hire an investigator to
probe possible violations of the Univer-

sity's military research policy.
The investigator would be paid $1,000
over the course of the term for 240 hours
of policy research, according to the
proposal approved last night.
Since its appearance in 1962, PIRGIM
has used a positive checkoff system to
fund its activities, which include con-
sumer information, lobbying efforts,
and environmental protection ac-
tivities.
STUDENTS are currently asked to
return signed a portion of their Student
Verification Form (SVF) to have the $2
charge appear on their tuition bill. The

new system would automatically
charge each student the $2, then offer
refunds to those who wished them.
In the past, only 20 percent of the
students have volunteered the needed
funds, said Ellen Shachter, a member
of the PIRGIM board of directors.
"When you're standing in a CRISP
line, the last thing on your mind is an
organization trying to get money," she
said.
Amy Gibans, also a member of the
board of directors, said that the
proposed "refusable refundable" fun-
draising scheme would double their

present revenue. "Most schools (with
PIRGIM chapters) have a refusable
refundable fundraising system."
PIRGIM has tried in past years to
change its funding system, but the
Regents have turned them down.
Critics of the proposed system say that
asking students to be assessed the fee
automatically would put PIRGIM at an
unfair advantage over both students
and other student groups.
The vote on the defense researcher
was reproposed by MSA, having tabled
the motion to hire a researcher last
See PIRGIM, Page 5

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Beaten and
battered:
Old classroom
furniture up
for sale

By BARB MISLE
When the anthropology department had a dead
gorilla shipped to it last year, Hugh Wenk got the box
it came in. Wenk sold it to a man who made it into a
fish tank.
Wenk, head property disposition manager for the
University, works at a large warehouse on Baxter
Road, past North Campus, which serves as a "half-
way house" for all of the University's unwanted fur-
niture and equipment.
FROM HIS perch, distant from the activities of
central campus, Wenk oversees the nearly 600
classrooms, 30,000 desks, and the innumerable win-
dows and chairs that comprise the University's daily
academic settings.
"Students don't see the plant side of the operation
at the University," Wenk said. "They don't see how
many things go into supporting this institution-it's

mind-boggling."
This year, Mason Hall received 821 new chairs,
costing the University nearly $20,000. But to those
who thought the purchase was a waste of money,
Wenk replies that many of the 40-year-old seats were
cracking and the graffiti was incredible.
WIlEN A department doesn't want a desk
anymore, or the hospital needs to get rid of a surgical
lamp, they send it to Wenk. That odd collection of
furniture and equipment then is sold to the public or
transferred to another department within the
University. It's a "there's a buyer for everything"
type of job.
"Every piece of furniture that is sold from the
University must come through the property
disposition office," Wenk said. "We are concerned
about funds going back into the University, naturally.
See FOR SALE, Page 3

AP Photo
Happy Days
Students wait outside Detroit's Cass Technical High School yesterday at
noon following a vote by teachers to end the 16-day strike. See story, Page 2.

........... . . .. ........... ....
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TODAY-
Smoke em all
TTENTION, enterprising and glory-bound
marketing and communications students! Philip
Morris, Inc.-of Marlboro, Merit, and Virginia
Slims fame-has announced its 14th Annual
Marketing/Communications Competition for Students.
Don't miss out on a chance to sharpen your marketing and
communications skills. To tempt all those brilliant
marketing and communications majors out there, the com-

Coordinator at 120 Park Ave., New York, N.Y., 10017, to find
out just what they want. Smoke 'em all. E
What's a Wuppet and why?
O H, HOW I WUV those Wuppets! Yes, there are such
things as Wuppets, and they are really wuvable.j

Wuppets are of various sizes, shapes and colors, are furry,
soft, and have cute little bug eyes. Bob Lorsch, personal
manager for the Wuppets, has recently been faced with a
problem. Lorsch wants a new name for the Wuppets and he
is offering $1,982 in Christmas Wishes to anyone who can re-
name the Wuppet by Dec. 10. For more information on
Wuppets and their search for a weal name, contact Marcy
MacDonald (213) 386-2042 or (213) 851-6682. OL
The Daily almanac
f\N THIS DATE in 1972, the State House of Representa-

Michigan's mistakes to pull out a tight victory (9-0) before a
crowd of 101,001 in the Wolverine Stadium.
" 1950-Old-time staffers met as the Daily hit its 60th
year. Alumni who remembered when the Daily was five
columns wide and reported only local news began to drift
into the Student Publications Building to help celebrate the
paper's anniversary and revive old memories. For instan-
ce, 19 men made up Daily's first staff, and in a first-year
editorial, called for more students to turn out for football
games. In 1900, the Daily's size changed, making it the
largest college paper in the country.n y

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