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October 05, 1982 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-05

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 5, 1982. Pagei3

Bucket drive aids draft resisters

By GEORGEA KOVANIS
With wire reports
Opponents of draft registration hit
the streets of Ann Arbor yesterday to
collect money for people who have
decided not to make themselves
available to Uncle Sam's armed forces.
In San Diego, meanwhile, a college
student was sentenced yesterday to 30
months in jail, making Benjamin
Sasway the first American to be jailed
for failing-to register for the draft since
the Vietnam War.

MEMBERS OF the Washtenaw Coun-
ty Committee Against Registration and
the Draft (WCARD) positioned them-
selves in locations throughout the cam-
pus and the city with buckets in hand,
ready for donations.
By the end of the day they had raised
$830.73, all of it to be used to aid in the
defense of registration evaders such as
Sasway, officials said. The money will
help pay for research and transcripts of
the trials, according to David DeVarti,
one of WCARD's founders.
DeVarti said he wasn't sure if the

Teachers in Detroit
reach tentative pact

money would go toward one case or be
distributed among several defendants.
IN SAN DIEGO, U.S. District Judge
Gordon Thompson said he would con-
sider grantingathe 21-year-old Sasway
bail pending an appeal. But the judge
would not let Sasway out of federal
custody until the defense lawyer
presents a plan to insure that he will
remain in the San Diego County area.
Sasway says he .is opposed to
registering for the draft because the
draft is subject to the capricious whim
of government. He has insisted he is not
a pacifist.
Sasway was the second man convic-
ted of failure to register with the Selec-
tive Service System since the Vietnam
War. Enten Eller was convicted Aug. 16
in Roanoke, Va. He was placed on three
years' probation and given 90 days to
register or face prison.
SASWAY'S LAWYER. Charles
Bumer, had asked the judge to sentence
Sasway to the time he has already ser-
ved in prison since a jury found him
guilty Aug. 26. Bumer said he had
presented the judge with 1,000 letters.
and a petition signed by 1,100 people
urging leniency for Sasway.
He noted that his client was not like
other criminal defendants in the federal
court, "people who committed crimes

for greed or violence."
Before his sentencing, Sasway
delivered a speech about his reasons for
failing to register.
SASWAY, A resident of Vista, said he
disagreed with government policies
"which are leading us to the brink of
nuclear war," and he said that the
decision to register for the draft is a
moral one.
U.S. Attorney Peter Nunez argues
"his (Sasway's) actions have been
motived by his political beliefs."
Nunez said that allowing Sasway to
decide which laws are just means "we
would then have to concede that right to
every person in the country."
About 300 anti-draft protesters rallied
in support of Sasway in a candlelight
vigil Sunday night in front of the federal
Metropolitan Correctional Center,
where Sasway was being held.
Among those at the rally were
Sasway's parents, Dolores and Joseph
Sasway, and David Harris, whose stand
against the draft during the Vietnam
War resulted in his imorisonmen't during
the 1960s.

Taking the hike
Backpacking and camping equipment
valued at more than $200 was taken
from an apartment on the 600 block of
Hill St. Friday, police said. The thief
forced a window to get at the items.
Cracked Crab break-in
More than $3,455 in cash was swiped
from The Cracked'Crab restaurant at
112 Washington early Saturday mor-
ning, police said. There was no sign of a
forced entry.
Safe cleaned out
The safe at the Food Mart on
Washtenaw Place was cleaned out at
7:30 p.m. Sunday night, and an
unknown amount of money was taken,
police said. Police believe that the
suspect hid inside the store before

closing and made off with the loot when
the store closed.
Pizza man robbed
A pizza delivery-man was held up by:
two men at knifepoint Sunday night oqg,
the 300 block of Commerce. The me,;
took his wallet and went home to order
a pizza.

From the United Press International
The Detroit Board of Eduction and
the leadership of the 11,000 teachers in
She Detroit district announced yester-
day they had reached a tentative
agreement - pending a ratification vote
- to end a 21-day strike that kept 200,000
students from classrooms.
The teachers are slated to vote on the
pact at 9 a.m. EDT today, and if ratified'
as expected, open classrooms at 11:30
A.m. with students being asked to
report to class the same day at 12:30
pm.
"I HAVE received contract language

from the Board of Education which I
feel comfortable with," said Detroit
Federation of Teachers President John
Ejliott. The Board of Education
released a statement saying, "We are
pleased to announce a tentative
agreement has been reached in the
current contract dispute with the
Detroit Federation of Teachers . . .
pending ratification."
The tentative agreement was ap-
provd yesterday by the DFT's 17-
member executive board which or-
dered the full membership meeting for
ratification.

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-- - r a

the university of michigan
center for chinese studies
presents

U I 1-t
IFilT4

-HAPPENI NGS-
Highlight
The Washtenaw County Campaign of the Michigan Nuclear Weapons
Freeze will have the first of several benefit concerts tonight at 8 p.m. at the
Unitarian Church, located at 1917 Washtenaw in Ann Arbor. Featured will be
the Ann Arbor Consort of Violos performing 'a selection of 17th century
English music.
Films
AAFC-Breaker Morant; 7 & 9 p.m., Aud. A.
CG-Seven Samari, 5:30 & 9:05 p.m.; Lorch Hall.
Performances
New Age Troubadours-Kathi and Milenko Matanovic, concert and
discussion. Canterbury Loft 332S. State St., 8 p.m.
Musical Society - Itzahk Perlman, Violinist, Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Union Arts Program-University Marimba Ensemble, 12:10 p.m., Junior
Sterling Chamber Players, 7:30 p.m., Pendleton Rm., Union.
Speakers
Hillel-Prof. Harold Fisch, "Israel at the Crossroads", 8:30 p.m., Hillel.
Chemistry - Departmental Colloquium, Prof. E. Negishi, "Selective Car-
bon-Carbon Bond'Formations Involving Transition Metal Catalysis", 4 p.m.,
130q Chem.
Statistics - Michael ,Woodroofe, "On INconsistent M-Estimators" by
Freeman and Diaconis, 2 p.m., 1437 Mason Hall.
Computing Center - David Whipple, "Integrated Graphics (I)", 3:30-5
p.m., 171 BSAD.
Computing Center - CC Counseling Staff, "Chalk Talk: MTS Files and
I/O",12:10-1 p.m., 1011 NUBS.
Science Research Club - Harry Semergian, "Communications in the
Space Age", and Arch Naylor, "Robotics", 7:30-10 p.m., Carroll Aud.;
Chrysler Center.
Bioengineering seminar-Richard Ashwin, "Kinetics of Methenoglobin
Reduction in Intact Erythrocytes Measured by Micro-Spectrophotometry",
4 p.m., 1042 E. Engineering.
Economics - Hans Erber, "The Political Economy of World Peace I, How
Democracy Works", 7 p.m., 1429 Mason Hall.
Human Growth and Development - George Nice, "Gravity, Positional
Homeostasis & Limits of Cell Size", 12 p.m., Rm. NI3E05, 300 N. Ingalls
Bldg.
Meetings
Amnesty International - 7 p.m., Crofoot Room, Union.
Ann Arbor Go Club-- 11 p. in., 1433 Mason Hall.
Science Research Club - 7:30 - 10:00 p.m., Aud., Chrysler Adult Education
Center, North Campus.
Baptist Student Union - 7 p.m., 2535 Mason Hall.
His House Christian Fellowship -7:30 p.m., Rm.D, Third Floor, League.
UM Bicycle Club -8 p.m., 1084 E. Engineering.
Miscellaneous
CEW - Informal Drop-in Job Hunt Club, 12-1:30 p.m.
Cntr. Library.
Natural Resources - Public Hearings, 3:00-5:00, Rackham Lecture Hall.
Ecumenical Cntr. & Int. Cntr-Lec. & Slide Presentation, Paul R. Dotson,
"The Soviet Union-A Tourist's View", noon, International Center.
Folk Dance Club - Beginning Classes 7-8:30 p.m., Intermediate
Macadonian class, 8:30-10 p.m., corner of William & State, top floor.
Transportation Studies - Workshop, H. J. Vulpanb, "Bicycle Transpor-
tation in the Netherlands", 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Henderson Room, League.
Woman's Athletics - Field Hockey, Michigan vs. CMU, 4 p.m., Ferry
Field. Volleyball, Michigan vs. Wayne State, 7 p.m., CCRB.
Museum of Art- Art Break, Margaret Coudron, Stella exhibition, 12:10-
12:30 p.m.
Nurses Alliance for the Prevention of Nuclear War-Dr. Armen Good,
"The Medical Effects of Nuclear War", and film "The Last Epidemic", 7:30
p.m., S6450, Main Hospital.
Lamaze Childbirth Preparation Assoc. of Ann Arbor - First meeting of
Miscarriage and Newborn Loss Support Group, 7-9 p.m., 2530 S. Main Street.
American Cancer Society - Stop Smoking Clinic, 7-8 p.m., Scarlett Inter-
mediate School, Ann Arbor.
National Spinning and Weaving Week-Public invited to attend daily
demonstrations 9:30-5:30 p.m., 415 N. Fifth Ave., Kerrytown.
University Artists and Craftsman - "Art 82", 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Grand Court
of Briarwood Mall.
Human resource Development - Personal Planning and Appraisal
workshop, 8:30-4:30 p.m., Room 130 LSA Bldg.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

THE SECOND ANNUAL
ALEXANDER ECKSTEIN MEMORIAL LECTURE
POST-MAO CHINA:
ON A NEW COURSE LEADING WHERE?
A. DOAK BARNETT
PROFESSOR OF CHINESE STUDIES
SCHOOL OF ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL STUDIES,
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

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