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October 01, 1982 - Image 16

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-01
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COVER STORY
Silver screen Page 1
Long the movie mecca for cinemaniacs
everywhere, Ann Arbor seems to have narrowed its
screenings of small, hard-to-find pictures and con-
centrated instead on sure money-makers.
THEATER
Playing around Page 3
W5 Productions, the latest in a long line of theater
companies in the area, intends to start off with a
bang, performing Bent this weekend.
FILM
Windy City Page 6
Tempest, Paul Mazursky's re-working of the
. classic Shakespeare play, gets reviewed.
THE LIST
Happenings Page 7-10
Your guide to fun times for the coming week in Ann

Arbor. Film capsules, music previews, theater notes,
and bar dates, all.listed in a day-by-day schedule.
Plus a roster of local restaurants.
RESTAURANTS
Kana Page 11
The city's newest Korean restaurant-did I hear
someone say "only Korean restaurant"-is critiqued.
MUSIC
Previews
This weekend you have your pick of concerts. Joe
Jackson plays Hill, Rita Marley follows, and Lords of
the New Church hold service at the Chance.
BANDS
Monster Page 14
Destroy All Mbnsters is back and better than ever.

Although you may not have noticed they were gone,
now that they're back, you'll never be the same.
CLASSICS
Baroque Page 15
There's no need for classical fans to sit around the
room and listen to Dvorak-there's plenty going on in
town. The Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra starts its
season this weekend and Itzhak Perlman comes to
Hill Auditorium Tuesday.
BOOKS
Ghosts Page 16
John Gardner's last work, Mickelsson's Ghosts,
gets the cover-to-cover treatment.

Harping
in town

0

Weekend Assistant Editor .......... . ............Ben Ticho sity year and is available for free at many locations
Vol Issue 2 around the campus and the city.
ndav. October 1, 1982 Weekend is edited and managed by students on Weekend, (313) 763-0379 and 763-0371; Michigan
the staff of The Michigan Daily at 420 Maynard, Ann Daily, 764-0552; Circulation, 764-0558; Display Ad-
Magazine Editors...........Richard Campbell Arbor, Michigan, 48109. It appears in the Friday vertising, 764-0554.
Michael Huget edition of the Daily every week during the Univer- Cover photo by Deborah Lewis.
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2 Weekend/October 1,-1982

By Susan Makuch
Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra
Featuring Jane Rosenson on harp
Michigan Theatre
8:30 p.m., Saturday, October 2
Tickets: $5-$10
ALTHOUGH conductor Carl Daehler
considered it "sheer lunacy" to
create a new orchestra in the height of
an economic recession, he did just that
in 1978. The punchline is, he has suc-
ceeded in building the Ann Arbor
Chamber Orchestra Society into a
nationally respected group.
The company, which consists mostly
of University of Michigan music
graduates, began on a tiny $2,000
budget. The odds were great that such a
scantily-funded organization would fold
almost immediately. And with what
Daehler terms "sheer determination,"
they were able to "buck the odds and
survive."
"The students and the Ann Arbor
community rally around the arts,"
Daehler explains. "Their en-
couragement and ticket purchases
have allowed us to grow to the size we
are now," he added. The 28-member
troupe now operates under a $150,000
budget.
Much of that funding comes from the
National Endowment for the Arts-a
program which has been slashed
drastically by President Reagan. The
Ann Arbor chamber group was able to
idiabout
By Lauris Kaldjian
Itzhak Perman
Hill Auditorium
8:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 5
Sold out
ARARE AND splendid pleasure it is
when an audience and musician
become one. Only a cherished handful
of artists have been able to accomplish
this almost unattainable feat, and one
of these is violinist Itzhak Perlman.
Tuesday, Oct. 5, this brilliant violinist
will share his music with a sold-out
audience at Hill Auditorium. As the ,
dulcet tones pour out of Perlman's
Stradivarius each listener will begin to
latch on to him like his bow hugs the
strings, with warmth and appreciation.
A response from an audience is a
matter of reciprocation. When one
hears and sees an artist opening up his
heart it is only natural to receive it and
return the favor. Itzhak Perlman is
acutely aware of this and gladly

keep their grant because, Daehler con-
veys, "our audience has increased, we
program primarily American music,
and because of our overall musical
quality." Only one other small or-
chestra has also kept its grant. "It
really makes us feel good to know we
survived the budget cuts because of our
quality," Daehler admits.
The quality is likely to increase this
season, with the impressive list of guest
soloists the company has lined up. The
new series includes Detroit Symphony
Orchestra harpist Jane Rosenson (Oct.
2) and pianist Panayis Lyras, silver
medalist at the Van Cliburn Inter-
national Piano Competition (Jan. 22).
Two of Daehler's favorites, Stephen
Burns on trumpet, and soprano
Kathleen Battle will also appear. Burns
is "so good, as soon as I saw him per-
form, I immediately asked him to play
with us," Daehler says en-
thusiastically. Since Burns has studied
at the University, his decision to appear
develops an intimate rapport with his
listeners.
Jascha Heifetz, a violin virtuoso with
bedazzling technique, believed people
came to hear him with the hope that
they would catch him making a
mistake; in spite of them Heifetz
proudly denied them the pleasure. Such
a defensive attitude is diametrically
opposed to Perlman's approach: to
share and communicate the joy of
music.
Born in Israel in 1945, Perlman's
parents supported his early desire (at
the age of three) to play the violin. Only
a year later he was stricken with polio
that since then has debilitated the free
use of his legs. The need of leg braces
and crutches, and sitting down while
performing, has hindered neither his
- ability nor his impact, in fact, it has
probably helped audiences see him as a
genuine person instead of an un-
touchable violinist.
After he patiently walks with his
crutches to centerstage and is handed
his violin, he sits, and seems to invite
those present to partake of the musical
wonders he is ready to reveal. His en-
tire character, his facial expressions,
everything about him suggests his
desire to recreate music in a form that
is tangible and chock-full of sincere
warmth.
Initial amazement at Perlman's im-
peccable technique eventually fades

was a quick one, Daehler reveals.
Daehler considers all the guests this
season "stars of tomorrow," and an-
ticipates a successful schedule.
The orchestra does not limit itself to
its subscription series at the Michigan
Theater. The group recently travelled
to Detroit's Fox Theater where they ac-
companied the silent movie version of
Robin Hood.
"It was a very interesting assign-
ment," Daehler says. "The score was
discovered in a library somewhere-we
were only the second orchestra to play
it," he explained. The response was so
encouraging, "we're hoping to bring
both Robin Hood and D.W. Griffith's
Broken Blossom to Ann Arbor this
spring."
Another activity the company found
itself involved in was an educational
concert for children. Daehler explains
that he "wanted to do it for a long time,
and we finally got the funding last
spring." He is quick to point out that "a

Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra: Baroque-ing away

local orches
to present t
have the p
response wa
certs will be
Daehler p
sity of his
year along
classical, bi
he says. "O
the music o
it's easy fo:
areas. One
have the gr
stops in the
For now,
"selling out
1,800 tickets
the audienc
will bring th
ce told by a
orchestra 'w
Ann Arbor.
premier, ho
out.

and is soon taken for granted as a
necessary facility to transport the
musical meaning behind the technical
wizardry. One can not help but put
complete trust in Perlman's ability, he
simply commands it.
Perlman often combines his efforts
with fellow musicians and friends. He
collaborated with Vladimir Ashkenazy
in the Beethoven Piano-Violin Sonatas,
and they produced some of the most
pure and lyrical music ever recorded.
Perlman firmly proved himself worthy
of Mstislav Rostropovich's company in
their recording of Brahms' Double
Concerto for Violin and Cello.
Perlman is versatile; he is not con-
fined to the realm of classical music.
With cohort Andre Previn, he has
recorded different types of jazz and
even Scott Joplin ragtime numbers.
It is difficult-if not impossible-to
detect any pretention in his music.
Perlman, like a good writer, knows and
speaks to his audience regardless of its
varying composition.
Unfortunately, Hill Auditorium has
not been able to accommodate the
many, too many, people who wish to
hear what promises to be a special con-
cert. For those who painfully realized
their misfortune at the ticket office, let
Perlman's numerous recordings, for
the present anyway, suffice. To the
privileged ticket holders, I need say no
more.

Perlman: 1

15 A

I,

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