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October 01, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Bomb
explodes
PP
.at. Texas
petrole *um
pant
BAYTOWN, Texas (AP)- A bomb
exploded yesterday at a Gulf Oil Co.
petrochemical plant as it was being
deactivated, authorities said. Four
other bombs were found in the apparent
extortion attempt and safely deac-
tivated.
No injuries were reported -as the ex-
plosion occurred while authorities used
a water cannon on the device, said the
Texas Department of Public Safety.
No details of the operation, or the com-
position of the bomb, were released.
THE FIVE devices were being deac-
tivated at the sites where they were
discovered on the plant grounds when
the bomb exploded, according to Sgt.
W.D. Marsh of the department.
Authorities were continuing to search
for other bombs, Marsh said.
Company officials and authorities
refused to comment on reports of a
warning that 10 bombs would be
detonated if a demand for up to $15
million was not met within 120 hours.
THE DEADLINE would be about
noon Sunday.
An unofficial source said. the bomb
threat was in a seven-page letter that
specified the location of one of the 10
bombs and said four others could be
found easily, The Baytown Sun repor-
ted. The source said those were the five
bombs found.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 1, 1982-Page 5
Prehistoric human being
discovered in Israel

NEW YORK (AP) - A new study
concludes that a prehistoric human an-
cestor lived in Israel 500,000 years
before appearing in Africa, challenging
the prevailing view that the human
race originated in Africa.
The finding does not necessarily
mean that the ancestor, known as
Homo erectus, evolved in Israel, says
the study's author, Charles Repenning
of the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo
Park, Calif.
"It's conceivable that he evolved
elsewhere and was on his way to Africa
when he died in Israel," Repenning said
yesterday in a telephone interview.
DAVID PILBEAM professor of an-
thropology at Harvard University,
called Repenning's finding "a sur-

prising result." Pilbeam said he has
not seen Repenning's study, which ap-
pears in the current issue of Nature
magazine.
Pilbeam said the finding is
"feasible," but that it is contradicted
by a substantial body of circumstantial
evidence that hominids - humans,
their direct ancestors and their extinct
cousins - evolved in Africa.,
One important reason for thinking so,
he said, is that a large number of 4-
million-year-old fossils have been found
in Europe and Asia, and no hominids
have been among them.
REPENNING agreed that the
australopithecines - the ape-like an-
cestors of Homo erectus - evolved in
Africa. "But they got out of Africa and

Homo evolved somewhere else, accor-
ding to the Ubeidiya story," he said,'
Repenning based his conclusions on7
re-examination of animal fossils found-
at an archeological site called'
Ubeidiya, two miles south of the Sea of
Galilee and west of the Jordan River.
Stone tools associated with Homo'
erectus have been found there and
judged to be about 700,000 years old.e
Similar tools thought to be 1.5 million,
years old have been found in ex-
cavations in Tanzania and Kenya. The
explanation has been that Homo erec-
tus, who presumably made those tools;
lived in Africa hundreds of thousands of
years before he migrated to Israel.

Marine killed in Beirut

(Continued from Page 1)
the Marines, who had been deployed in
Beirut earlier this summer to help
oversee the evacuation of Palestine
Liberation Organization guerrillas
from the Israeli-ringed city. The
Marines returned Wednesday on their
second peacekeeping mission.
PRESIDENT Reagan reacted with
"shock and sorrow," but said the
casualties would have no effect on the
U.S. commitment to remain in Lebanon
until Israeli and Syrian troops ae out
and the government is in control, White
House deputy press secretary Larry
Speakes said in Washington.
Pentagon spokesman Henry Catto
said in Washington the blast was "just
an accident," not the result of hostile
action against U.S. forces.
The victims were immediately flown

to the U.S.S. Guam, the helicopter
carrier that serves as flagship for the
U.S. fleet supporting the Marines in
Lebanon.,
ONE MARINE died after reaching
the Guam, another was seriously
wounded and the other two were
slightly wounded - one with a leg
wound and the other with an arm

explosion
wound, DeLorme said.
Their identities were withheld, but
the Lebanese army siad the dead man
was an officer.
U.S. officials said about 300 Marines
came ashore yesterday, bringing to
1,200 the strength of the U.S. force
guarding the airport and surrounding
areas.

the university of michigan
center for chinese studies
presents

Just pull the string
The cards shown are not a mock-up of state placards at a political conven-
tion, but rather parts of an art display by Kathy Constantinedes at the
Slusser Gallery in the art school. the work, entitled "Karnak Dissolve," in-
vites each visitor "to pull enough thread to release one word, and to take the
word away."~

n 5191.

*Congress fails to set 1983 budget, parties instead

(Continued from Page 1)
the resolution will be in effect only until
Dec. 17. After that date, the new
Congress would have to vote on their
own appropriations. "Then anything
can happen," he said.
Edwin Dale, a spokesman for the Of-
fice of Budget and Management, said
no disruption in operations is likely,
provided Reagan accepts the com-
Sromise.
Nevertheless, Dale said all gover-
nment agencies were notified yester-
day to begin "shutdown" operations
today.
ALSO IN Congress this week, the
House voted in favor of a resolution to'
keep the Basic Educational Oppor-
tunity (Pell) Grant 1982-83 family coil-
tribution schedule for the next
academic year.

This schedule determines what
amount of discretionary income
families are expected to contribute to
education, and therefore determines
the amount of aid a grant candidate is
eligible for.
The bill awaits Reagan's signature or
veto,
Although agreement on the com-
promise bill came several hours before
the midnight deadline, congressional
leaders decided against a late-night
session to pass the measure on an
evening when major social events were
scheduled for both Democrats and
Republicans.
THE DEMOCRATIC party had a
$1,000-per-person fund-raising dinner
that many members of Congress were
expected to attend. Anq President
Reagan invited the entire Congress to a

barbecue at the White House in what
amounted to a counter-event dominated
by Republicans.
The stopgap spending plan will keep
the entire government in business until

Dec. 17, thereby assuring a post-
election session of Congress in which
lawmakers will debate the regular
money bills that have not yet been ap-
proved.

THE SECOND ANNUAL
ALEXANDER ECKSTEIN MEMORIAL LECTURE
POST-MAO CHINA:
ON A NEW COURSE LEADING WHERE?
A. DOAK BARNETT
PROFESSOR OF CHINESE STUDIES
SCHOOL OF ADVANCED INTERMATIONAL STUDIES,
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

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