100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1982 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, March 29, 1982-Page 3
Coiie JMiigau etuiep r
Conservatives get paper

By HALLE CZECHOWSKI
They're here. The first publication at
the University with a conservative
staff. They're promising a November
publication date. They're the Michigan
Review.
Vowing to "challenge the existing ar-
chaic liberal establishment," Tom
Fous, the founder of the publication
also promises to allow a broad range of
opinion into the paper, including those
frm the left.
"WE WANT to maintain some jour-
nalistic integrity," said Fous, a
mechanical engineering student.,
"We are not a newspaper, it's a
review, a scholarly piece," Fous said.
Initially shunning traditional adver-
tising, the Review plans to solicit
money from conservative groups and
corporations.
Fous admits that the first issue is not
yet paid for, and said there are several
possible contributors he has not heard
from.
"WE HAVE the money, just not in

hand," said Fous who also serves as the
paper's publisher.
Though the money has not been
pouring in, the support has, said
Managing Editor Andrew Mathieson.
University Prof. Paul McCracken, con-
servative intellectual Russell Kirk,
American Spectator Editor R. Emmett
Tyrrell, and Irving Kristol, of Public
Interest, have all given their support,
Mathieson said.
In addition, William F. 'Buckley
recently sent a telegram to the staff
congratulating them on their endeavor,
he added.
EDITOR RON Stefanski said that
while the editorial staff is staunchly
conservative, the publication will at-
tempt to separate their own opinions
from the others that appear in the
paper.
"What we want to present is a range
or spectrum of opinion," Mathieson
said.
An eight-page tabloid, the Review

will be dropped in strategic locations
around campus after the elections,
Fous said, and eventually distributed to
all campuses in Michigan.
THE FIRST few issues will not con-
tain advertisements, but Fous said he
hopes later issues will not only contain
ads, but also be delivered to people with
subscriptions.
The Review recently has been
recruiting staff members to augment
the 15 currently on staff. A mass
meeting for interested persons is
scheduled for tomorrow.
. The content of the first issue has not
been completely determined; but Fous
said there would be a left - right debate
and a piece on education. "We will be
reprinting a considerable amount of ar-
ticles," Fous said.
"The scope is going to be not so much
on issues just pertinent to Ann Arbor,
we are aiming to a larger audience,"
Mathieson said.

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
Doctoring the turf
Bubbles in the turf at Michigan Stadium are being carefully attended to by David Dietere. Dietere injects the bubbles
with a syringe of glue.
Deadline for insurance extended
11. 7rP lw Ai V V "t

Rabbi warns against 'New Right'

WDVy BrEH ALLEIN ,

The University has extended the deadline for enrollment in
its student accident and insurance plan.
Students now have until Oct. 15 to consider enrolling in the
rlan, contrary to information sent to students before fall
erm began, when the deadline was listed as Aug. 24.
| DAN PLANTE, student insurance committee coordinator,
said that the deadline has been extended because the Univer-
sity was late in providing student address labels to Mutual of
Omaha, underwriters of the new insurance policy.
Mutual of Omaha was selected from approximately a
ozen bidders to replace G-M Underwriters, who had
rovided the University-endorsed student insurance policy
for nine years.
Plant said that the main difference in the two plans was the
elimination of the alternate health plan. The new policy of-
fers only one package (with an option for accidental death or
dismemberment benefits, as in the old plan) with somewhat
broader coverage as opposed to the two package old plan.
A PACKAGE is a series benefits put together in a policy.
The new plan treats pregnancy as any illness; increases
the maximum benefits from $15,000 to $20,000; increases out-
patient coverage from $200 per year to $200 per incident; and
ds a nine-month waiting period for students with pre-
existing conditions, in order to prevent students from making
immediate claims on a policy, which causes premiums to in-
;rease.
Despite student requests in a survey taken last winter
berm, the insurance committee did not add eye and dental

care to the package this year.
HEALTH SERVICES Patient Relations Director Ellie Puf-
fe, a menber of the insurance committee, said that the
committee members decided that including eye and dental
care benefits would have driven thi premium up, as the high
number of claims would raise the cost of the premiums.
"It would have boosted the premium to such extravagant
costs that it would be out of the students' price range," Puffe
said.
Although Health Services does not carry free dental ser-
vice, Puffe said that the University dental clinic now
operates a low-cost clinic within the Health Services
facilities.
IN ADDITION to providing broader benefits, the new plan
has also evened up the premiums between the three Univer-
sity campuses, unlike the previous policy in which Flint and
Dearborn campus students paid a slightly higher premium
because they do not assess a health service fee, Plante'said.
The change in companies has also meant a change in the
administrative procedures, according to Plante. Insurance
records will be kept and processed at Health Service, instead
of at the Michigan Student Assembly offices as in previous
years.
"It's a lot more convenient from MSA's standpoint to have
the files at Health Services," MSA President Amy Moore
said. Mutual of Omaha now hires a coordinator to handle the
insurance instead of requiring MSA's staff to keep the recor-
ds, she added.

By SCOTT STUCKAL
The political "New Right" threatens to
undermine the very principles on which
the United States was founded, accor-
ding to the leader of the Voice of
Reason, a nationwide civil liberties
group.
Rabbi Sherman Wine, the co-founder
of the Voice of Reason, charged last
night that New Right politicians, like
Sen. Jesse Helms (R. N.C.), seek to
dismantle the American tradition of
separation of church and state.
"THE NEW Right is a radical way to
create an authoritarian state," Wine
tole about 150 students gathered lat
night in the Michigan Union. "They
threaten to change the very nature of
society."
In particular, the leader of 6,000-
member group blasted Helms for his
attempts to push through legislation
outlawing abortion and reinstating
prayer in public schools.
"Helms introduced a whole series of
social issues to divert the American
people from the real issue, the
economic issue," Wine said.
WINE CALLED Helms's proposal to
reverse the Supreme Court's 1973
decision legalizing abortion a "court-
stripping" measure designed to alter
the court's role as designated in the
constitution. Excessive government

involvement in abortion interferes with
personal privacy and freedom, Wine
claimed.
He also criticized Helm's proposal
supporting individual and group prayer
in public schools. "Whyare we getting
so excited about a little school prayer?
Because of the power of intimidation."
Wine insisted that teacher-led group
prayer would pressure children to con-
form to the majority's religious beliefs,
thus undermining the separation of
church and state. Rather than allowing
for individual religious expression,
Wine said, the New Right wants to
promote a "majority" religion. "If that
were the case, then you would have a
town meeting at the University every
morning to determine how every
student should act."
WINE BELIEVES the New Right
wants to dismantle Thomas Jefferson's
dream of a secular state in which in-
dividual liberty and majority opinion

e,.*
t
t
4
t
*-
i
S
6
a
Y
h
d
V.
'-
4l
r
r
r
J
i
J
V

:r

HAPPENINGS
Highlight
The Gap Band, a funky rhythm and blues group, with guests Zapp/Roger
with Goodie perform tonight at 7:30 in Crisler Arena at another Major Even-
ts concert.
Films
AAFC-Metropolis with live piano, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., MLB.
Cinema II-Rashomon, 7 & 9 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Alt. Act. Pol. Series-The War Game, 8:30 p.m., EQ.
Hill St. Cinema-African Queen, 7 & 9p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Speakersg
Chemical Eng.-Lec., Brice Carnahan, "The FORTRAN IV Program-
ming Language II," Nat. Sci. Aud., 7-9 p.m.
Chemistry-Analytical Sem., Robert Collins, "Emission & Absorption
Spectroscopy of Atomic Species Generated in Electrically Vaporized Con-
ductor Plasmas," 1200 Chem., 4 p.m.; Organic Sem., Michael Walters,
"Nucleophilic Addition to Olefins Mediated by Cationic Sulfur," 1300 chem.,
4 p.m.
Natural Resources-Forest Management Sem. Series, O.J. Scherschligt,
"Recreation & Law Enforcement on State Land," 1040 Dana Bldg., 3-5 p.m.
Ind. & Oper. Eng.-Sem., Robert Culhan, "The Role of Operations
Research in Decision Support Systems for Top Management," 222 W. Eng., 4
p.m.
Computing Ctr.-Lec., Forrest Hartman, "Intro. to the MTS File Editor
(II), 171 BSAD, 3:30-5 p.m.
Biological Sciences-Sem., Michael O'Shea, "From Molecules to
Behavior: A Peptide Neuro-Transmitter in An Insect," MLB II, 4 p.m.
St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Adult Education Lecture Series, Dr.
Alexander Makedon, "Discipline in the Schools; Research and Ethical Con-
siderations," 414 North Main, 8 pm.
Meetings
U of M Bicycle Club-8 p.m., 1084 E. Engineering.
LSA Student Gov't.-6:15 p.m., MSA chambers, 3009 Mich. Union.
Russian and E. European Studies-Brown Bag Luncheon, "Wajda's Man
of Marble & Man of Iron," Commons Rm., Lane Hall, Noon.
Sci Fiction Club-"Stilyagi Air Corps," Ground Floor Conference, Union,
8:15p.m.
Academic Alcoholics-2549 LSA, Noon.
Commission for Women-2549 LSA, Noon.
Student Wood & Crafts Shop-Power Tools, 537 SAB, 5-11:30 p.m. For info,
call 763-4025 after 5.
Democratic Socialists of America-Outreach Mtg and Discussion, Welker
Rm, Union, 7:30 p.m.
Greenpeace, New Mbrs. Meeting-Conf. Rm. 4, Union, 8 p.m.

Friend says Arroyb
admitted setting fire

I

INDIVIDUAL THEATRES

WED
Only$1.7
shows bek
6:00 p.m.

757
ore
.
0,

are balanced. "In order to have a
society where truth is found you have to
have all kinds of opinions from which to
choose."
Ret a C0r
from
19 YRoOLD
Choose from small
economical cars to
vans.
Special
WEEKEND
rates
Pick up services
upon request
We accept
cash deposits
OPEN 7
DAYS A WEEK
ECONO-CAR'
438 W. Huron
761-8845
ANN ARBOR

By GEORGE ADAMS
Another friend of accused Economics
Building arsonist Arthur Arroyo
testified yesterday that Arroyo admit-
ted setting the Christmas Eve, 1981
blaze.'
After the proceedings, defense attor-
ney Mitchell Nelson said he probably
will bring in psychological testimony
into the case and that insanity would
play a prominent role in his defense.
ABDULLAH Al-Hosan, a friend of
Arroyo's who testified at the request of
Assistant Washtenaw County
Prosecuting Attorney Robert Cooper,
said Arroyo confessed a few days after
Christmas to setting the 125-year-old
building on fire.
"He (Arroyo) said 'I cannot lie to
you, I lit the fire in the Economics
Building,' " Al-Hosan testified.
"He said he broke a window and set
the fire, but said he didn't mean (the
fire) to be that big," Al-Hoan continued.
"He said he thought someone else in

the building helped make the fire that
big."
"HE WAS SORRY for doing it," Al-
Hosan added. "He said he didn't want
to (set the fire) and didn't know why he
had done so.
After the day's proceedings, Nelson
said he would take a three pronged ap-
proach to Arroyo's defense.
"First, we contend that his intent
was to burn small items in the building,
not the whole structure. That's arson
personal property, not ARson real
property (which Arroyo is being
charged with). Those are two different
statutes.
"SECOND, insanity. Arthur
Arroyo's behavior that evening was a
psychotic episode that was triggered
and sent him off uncontrollable.
"And third, that the building was not
fire safe in the first place; that no ac-
celerant was used."

Gregorye Girl
WED-12:50, 2:40, 4:40, 6:3
8:20, 10:10
THUR-6:30, 8:20, 10:10

"IT WILL LEAVE YOU FEELING
10 FEET TALL' -REX REED
AN
OFFICER
ANA
GENTLEMAN
DEBRA
WINGER
RICHARD
GERE
WED-12:40 3:00, 5:00, 7:40, 9:55
THURS-7:40, 9:55

114 E.
Washington

EDIED8'S

665-3231

Are you a star without a stage?
AUDITIONS

ATENVTION STUDENTS!
Mon & Tues
HALF PRICE on PIZZA
5 pm til closing
Wed & Thur
Half price on
DRAFT BEER

for
UAC SOPH SHOW '82
EGG Bye,
6( , Birdie'
Come to the
MASS MEETING
Wednesday, September 29,
7:30pm in the Ballroom

DANCING!

9 pm til closing

Miscellaneous
School of Music-Tour of Carillon, top of Burton Tower, 4-5 p.m.
UAC Soph. Show-Main meeting, 7:30 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Alice Lloyd Pilot Prog-"How to Eat Right in the Dorm," 8 p.m. in Red
Lounge.
Ark-Open Mike Night, 1421 Hill St., 9 p.m.
Tae Kwon Do Club-Martial Arts Practice, Sports Coliseum (Hill St. & 5th
Ave~ }

Fri & Sat
Dance to the sounds of JUDGE
'2 PRICE on PIZZA and
DRAFT BEER

,I

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan