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September 24, 1982 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-24

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I

The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 24, 1982-Page 7
Senate votes to dump

Mass
murderer
convicted
in retrial
HAYARD, Calif. (AP) - a jury
convicted Juan Corona at his retrial
yesterday of 25 counts of murder for
Wstabbing and slashing migrant farm
workers to death more than a decade
ago in what was then the nation's worst
mass slaying.
Corona, 48, showed little emotion as
court clerk Melissa Fowler read the fir-
st-degree murder verdicts returned by
the jury after 1 day of deliberation.
"HE TOOK IT like a man," defense
attorney Terence Hallinan told repor-
ters of his client, although he said
Corona was depressed by the outcome.
As the verdicts were read, Corona
wrote notes which Hallinan later said
were "Thank you" notes to court per-
sonnel and a message to his brother,
Felix Corona, a Phoenix, Ariz.,
businessman.
Superior Court Judge Richard Pat-
ton, on assignment from Sutter County,
set sentencing for Oct. 21, at which time
he said he would consider a defense
request for a new trial. The maximum
*penalty would be a reinstating of his
earlier life sentence since California
had no death penalty law on the books
when the murders occurred
STATE officials said Corona was now
eligible for immediate parole con-
sideration by the state Board of Prison
Terms because of the more than 11
years he has served in prison.
The jury of seven men and five
women had deliberated for more than
53 hours after a trial that lasted seven
months and cost the state an estimated
$5 million.
Announcement of the verdicts took 41
minutes in the Alameda County Cour-
thouse chamber because each juror
was polled individually after the
decision was read on each of the 25
counts.
Patton, who also presided at the first
trial, called the jurors "dear friends"
as he discharged them and urged them
not to comment on their verdicts. 'You
owe to no one any explanation," he
said.
Corona was cohvicted and sentenced
to life in prison after his first trial in
21972. But in 1978 an appeals court or-
dered a new trial on grounds that
Corona did not receive adequate legal
representation the first time.

school prayer issue
WASHINGTON (AP)- The Senate similar filibuster by liberals.
dealt a killing blow yesterday to the last THE THIRD item on the"
remaining item on the "New Right's" issues" agenda of Helms and his<
social agenda as it set aside legislation an anti-busing measure, did m
designed to restore organized prayer to through the Senate. But it's b
public schools. down in the House, with virtua
With the urging of Republican Leader chance of enactment in the rema
Howard Baker, the chamber voted 79 to of the 97th Congress.
16 to call a halt to the week-long battle Helms' prayer measure would
over Helms' proposal to strip the stripped the Supreme Court(
federal courts of jurisdiction over the jurisdiction over school prayerc
prayer issue.
THE VOTE marked another personal The prayer measure was attac
defeat for the New Right's leader in the a federal debt ceiling bill which
Senate, Jesse Helms (R-N C.). clear Congress by Oct. 1 or the,
Earlier, Helms l -st his fourth and nment will be without author
Earier Hems osthisfouth nd borrow money to pay its open
final attempt to stem a liberal filibuster
on the issue. The vote to limit the costs.
debate was 53 to 45, still seven votes
short of the 60 needed.
Helms was left with virtually no room
for further maneuvering in the current mG
session, since the 79-16 tally deleted the 375N MAPLE
prayer issue from the debt-limit bill to L.C2769.300
which it was attached. That setback 1.00 TUESDAYS
followed the Senate's dumping of an an-
ti-abortion package last week, after a

'social
allies,
ake it
bogged
ally no
ainder
d have
of all
cases.
hed to
must
gover-
ity to
rating

Doily Photo by Scott Zolton
One with everything
As the outdoor hot dog season draws to a close, Pete Smith waits impatiently yesterday as vendor Richard
Blondie meticulously prepares his specialty.
Smoking studies contradictory

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NEW YORK (AP) - The headline read: Low-tar and
Nicotine Cigarettes Pose Less Danger. The story was about
a study by the American Cancer Society.
Less than a week later, another headline appeared:
Evidence 'Doubtful' That Low-Tar Cigarettes Reduce Health
Risk. This time, it was the National Academy of Sciences
Speaking.
TWO STUDIES by distinguished scientific organizations
had reached opposite conclusions. Why?
The answer, according to interviews with doctors around
the country, is that the reduced risk associated with low-tar
cigarettes-if any.i~s very small.
The American Cancer Society study of 1 million people
from 1960 to 1972 found that low-tar cigarettes were slightly
less harmful than other cigarettes. Smokers of low-tar
cigarettes-defined as cigarettes with less than 18 milligrams
of tar-were 26 percent less likely to die of lung cancer than
other smokers.
THAT MAY sound like an impressive statistic until it is put
into perspective. Smokers of low-tar cigarettes are indeed
slightly better off. But men who smoke low-tars are still
eight or nine times more likely to get lung cancer than men
who don't smoke, says Lawrence Garfinkel of the cancer
society. For high-tar smokers, Garfinkel said, the risk is 10
or 11 times greater than for non-smokers.
For women, whose incidence of smoking and lung cancer is
much lower, the figures are slightly different. Women who

smoke low-tars have a slight advantage over other women
smokers, but are still three times as likely to get lung cancer
as non-smokers, Garfinkel says.
Most studies of low-tar cigarettes have found evidence that
they are slightly less harmful. the study by the National
Academy of Sciences, which found it "doubtful" that low-tars
have any benefits, is somewhat at odds with other studies,
doctors say.
THE ACADEMY said smokers of low-tar cigarettes - which
it defined as less than 15 milligrams of tar -may inhale
deeper and hold the smoke in their lungs longer to satisfy
their craving for nicotine.
Nevertheless, because the difference between the hazards
of low-tars and regular cigarettes is so small, doctors ex-
pect studies to disagree.
"When you get a sharp association -such as you do bet-
ween smoking and lung cancer - pretty much every study
finds it," says Dr. Brian MacMahon of Harvard University.
"But when you come down to smaller differences, there are
so many sources of error that it seems to be the rule that
there is disagreement."
IN ITS LATEST report on smoking and health, released in
February, the surgeon general's office noted some evidence
of reduced risk with low-tar cigarettes, but stopped short of
recommending that smokers make the switch, Koop said.
Lung cancer is not the only disease linked with smoking.
Heart disease causes twice as many smoking-related deaths.

1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 9:15
1:30
4:00
r 7:00
9:15
1:00
A RRA ROSA3:00
7:00
9:30

-J

AN OFFICER
AND A
GENTLEMAN
DEBRA WINGER
RICHARD GERE

Allied delays Bendix bid

(Continued from Pagel)
$85 a share for about 55 percent of Ben-
dix's stock and securities for the rest in
a deal worth $1.9 billion.
Allied also had planned to spend
about $500 million more to acquire the
30 percent of Marietta stock not already
owned by Bendix. That would give it
control of both Bendix and Marietta
with a $2.3 billion deal that would more
* than double Allied's size.
Also, Allied said that under a
separate'agreement, Bendix would sell
to Allied its aerospace electronics
group-not including its electrical con-
nector business- for $800 million in
cash. That transaction would go
through regardless of whether the
merger of the two companies was com-
pleted, Allied said.
IN LANSING yesterday, the State
Legislature approved legislation
designed to strengthen the state attor-
ney general's hand in the court suit
against a takeover bid of Bendix Corp.
of Michigan by Martin Marietta.
But the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals, in an order issued in Detroit at
same time, cleared legal obstacles to
the purchase of Marietta of Bendix
shares held by Michigan residents.
The bill, approved 102-0 by the state
House and 31-2 by the state Sente,
prohibits the acquisition of stock where

the effect is to substantially lessen
competition. It is patterned after
federal law.
"This bill will stop the dismember-
ment and divestment of Bendix in
Michigan," said Sen. John Kelly, (D-
Detroit) .2
Rep. Richard Fessler, (R-Union
Lake), however, said Bendix may not
deserve the state's hlep since it
initiated the takeover war.
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Michigan
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