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September 09, 1982 - Image 22

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-09

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Page 22-Thursday, September 9, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Schoo1ls, n
4o
(Continued from Page is) plore possibilities to inc
rraduate Studies offers a rather unique ficiency between Racki
proach to graduate education. While units in which it administ(
te school administers most of the 3Dean Alfred Sussman,
graduate programs on campus, it does,. member, said the revi
not maintaini its own faculty or direct ticularly focus on the adn
tudent enrollment. fellowships and admissior

n-academic units studied for cuts

crease the ef-
ham and the
ers programs.
n, also a BPC
iew will par-
ministration of
ns.

Rackham received a 1981-82 fiscal
budget of $1,691,340, and supervises,
ome 6,500 graduate students.
THE RACKHAM review, scheduled
i begin during the fall, will look for.
some reductions, but not major ones,
4ccording to Robert Sauve, a Univer-
sity administrator and member of the
Budget Priorities Committee (BPC).
Sauve said Rackham will be reviewed
ir reductions, but not total
elimination.
Administrators said they hope to ex-

ADMINISTRATORS said the review
stems from an earlier analysis of the
school by a committee chaired by
Economics Prof. Gardner Ackley. The
Ackley report identified several areas
within the, school that were deficient
and needed improvement. Since then
some of the recommendations have
been implemented, but some have not.
Part of the purpose of a new review will
be to examine why certain recommen-
dations were not implemented and to
identify the future direction of the
school.

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A 1981 budget conference report iden-
tified several areas that would require
special support, including interdepar-
tmental programs, foreign student
needs, minority student needs, and
student financial aid.
Foreign students were identified as a
x "special concern" because ad-
ministrators maintain that U.S. ap-
plications are decreasing and foreign
applications are increasing.
This is primarily an administrative
budget review. Admissions, Student Af-
fairs, Graduate Academic Records,
and the Office of Non-Academic Career
Counseling and Placement will all be
scrutinized for cuts.
Institute for the
Study of Mental
Retardation
and Related
Disabilities
The Institute for the Study of Mental
Retardation and Related Disabilities-
one of the first units targeted for
review-was the first unit to complete
the review process. The recommen-
dation is elimination.
The University Regents will decide
this fall whether the institute will un-
dergo complete elimination as recom-
mended by the Budget Priorities Com-
mittee and its review subcommittee.
WITH A 1981-82 budget of $290,000
funded through the Office of the Vice-
President for Academic Affairs, the in-
stitute provides a direct link to com-
munity organizations involved in job
skills development, testing and
evaluation, health interests, and tran-
sient programs for the mentally han-
dicapped.
In addition, it is one of the few
university-related mental retardation
research centers in the nation and the
only one in1 Mchigan.
Administrators cited continuing
problems in administration of the
program which they say may have
resulted in the loss of a major federal
grant last year. They also say that the
quality of research has not been
adequate.
In rebuttal, Institute Director Her-
bert Grossman said that subcommittee
members did not conduct a thorough
review of the institute and that they ap-
proached the review with a precon-
ceived recommendation of closure.

3

Representatives of several com-
munity agencies differed in their
evaluation of the institute's programs,
some calling the institute a "mixed
bag" with some programs rating ex-
cellent and others poor.
Center for the
Continuing
Education of
Women
The Center for the Continuing
Education -of Women (CCEW) was
targeted for a special review earlier
this year, and is the first unit under a
five-year plan review to come out in-
tact.
The Center already was due for a
regular programmatic review when the
five-year plan began last spring. But
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Billy Frye said he expected"the center
to undergo a budget review im-
mediately following the conclusion of
the first study.
THE PANEL that first looked at the
center, however, recommended in July
that the center be continued without
undergoing a second review. Frye ac-
cepted the committee's recommen-
dation.
The center has a 1981-82 academic
year budget of $237,000 and distributes
$41,000 in scholarships earmarked for
program participants. The center spon-
sors a wide range of programs in-
cluding special evening classes for
working women, seminars, academic
support, and workshops.
After announcing the review, ad-
ministrators received letters indicating
great support for continuation of the
center, which was created in 1964. Sup-
porters turned out for Regents'
meetings and public forums and met
with administrators.
THE REVIEW subcommittee' was
charged with evaluating the center to
determine whether it had kept pace
with society's changes since its concep-
tion and whether its services are
duplicated by already existing Univer-
sity units.
CCEW will now be classified with
units that are not under review and will
be subjected to a yearly review for
budget cuts of up to 15 percent along
with most other University units.
CCEW is classified as a non-
academic unit-one that does not offer
a degree or credit courses.'
In accepting the recommendations of
the review committee, Frye called the
evaluation one of the most thorough he
has seen.
"The important thing is that this
report has been accepted," said Jean
Campbell, CCEW director.

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'I

Doily Photo by KIM HIIt-
A STUDENT in the School of Art work; on her sculptur e. The qIestion
is will others be able to follow in her footsteps at the University '

Institute for the
Study of Labor
and Industrial
Relations
The Institute for the Study of Labor
and Industrial Relations, a non-
academic unit, received a 1981-82
general fund allocation of $308,614-all
in salaries and wages.
ILIR holds workshops, seminars, and
conferences dealing with labor and
labor-related issues including unem-
ployment, unionizations, cultural, and
job forecasts.
IN ADDITION, ILIR conducts basic
research for several national and
governmental units including the
Department of Labor and the Nationale
Institute of Mental Health.
Administrators targeted the institute
for review of its quality and centrality.
Subcommittee members have looked at

whether some of its responsibilities
have shifted to other University units
and whether there were compelling
reasons not to close ILIR.
ILIR staff members have mounted a
campaign to inform and mobilize
community support for its programs
through forums and letters.
COMMUNITY response has been
overwhelming in support of the in-
stitute with letters and resolutions from
the Detroit City Council, Michigan
House of Representatives, and such
well-known labor leaders as Leonard
Woodcock.
The institute recently received
several grants from the U.S. Depar-
tment of Labor to conduct unem-
ployment research.
Originally a joint effort with the In-
stitute for Labor and Industrial
Relations at Wayne State University,
administrators recommended and the
Regents approved a split between the
two school last year.
ILIR celebrated its 25th anniversary
this year.

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