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September 14, 1982 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-14

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'1

Detroit teachers veto
ay cuts, go on stri

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 14, 1982-Page 3
Israel's new attack
resumes Syrian war

DETROIT (UPI)- Detroit's 11,000 public school
teachers rejected pay cuts and went on strike yester-
day, more than doubling the number of students af-
fected by walkouts across the nation as the 1982-83
school year moved into full swing.
School officials told the 200,000 students in Detroit,
the nation's seventh largest school district, to report
for classes despite the walkout. Strikes by 1,700
teachers in six other Michigan districts. canceled
classes for an additional 30,000 pupils.
MARATHON contract talks between the board and
the Detroit Federation of Teachers (DFT) broke off
Sunday night, though state fact-finder David Tan-
zman said the two sides were close to agreement at
the time.
"I hope it's not a long strike, but I really don't
know,"said a dejected Detroit School Superintendent

Arthur Jefferson. "The parties have stopped
negotiating. There will be no teachers in class."
Jefferson said any decision on. whether schools
would remain open during the strike would be made
"on a school-by-school basis."
THE DFT'S executive board voted unanimously
Saturday to reject the school board's latest offer, set-
ting the stage for yesterday's strike.
The Board of education wants teachers to accept a
salary rollback to 1980-81 levels to help wipe out a
projected $38-60 million deficit. That would cut the
salary schedule from the present $15,027 to $30,000 to
$13,786 to $27,606.
"The attitude of teachers now is absolutely no con-
cessions," DFT President John Elliott said Sunday.
Elliott said the union does not believe the school
board made enough efforts to economize in other
areas.

From AP and UPI
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Waves of
Israeli warplanes pounded Palestinian
and Syrian targets in Lebanon yester-
day and struck within three miles of the
Syrian border in the heaviest bombar-
dment since Israel's assault against
west Beirut one month ago.
In a sharp escalation from recent at-
tacks on Syrian anti-aircraft missiles,
Israeli warplanes ranged up and down
the strategic Bekaa Valley in eastern
Lebanon, striking more than a dozen
different targets for about eight hours.
THE NEW Israeli air strikes
heightened the possibility of a major
confrontation between Israeli and

Syrian soldiers in Lebanon. It was the
fourth time in five days that Israeli
warplanes carried out raids against the
Syrians.
Yesterday's strikes left several
military emplacements afire, Lebanese
radio stations reported. Israel said the
attacks ended yesterday afternoon and
all planes returned safely.
Israel said the bombing was in
retaliation for 98 violations of a July 23
cease-fire and a clear warning to
Damascus to stop helping Palestinian
guerrillas behind Syrian lines.
A SYRIAN military communiqui
broadcast said its forces had engaed
See ISRAELI, Page ?

Pearl Rucker, a math teacher at Detroit's Martin
Luther High School, resolutely walks the picket lines
yesterday morning along with 11,000 other teachers.

VOLUNMTEERAT THE UNIVERSITYOFMICHIOAN HOSPITALS
Come Explore: Attend an information session to learn about the
opportunities in:
ADULT/CHILD PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALS
AMBULATORY CARE SERVICES
MAIN HOSPITAL
MOTOR MEALS OF ANN ARBOR
MOTT CHILDREN'S/WOMEN'S HOSPITALS
When: September 13, 1 and 21.-7:00 pm September 16-1:30 pm
Where: MainHospitaln, 6th floor amphitheater
For more information, col 763-6710

H APPENINGS- Frye says 'U' woes
0 - -g .1

Highlight
Registration for Introduction to Woodworking, Section I begins today at
Student Wood & Craft Shop, 537 S.A.B. Thompson St. Class will meet on
Tuesdays 7-10 p.m., Sept. 21-Oct. 26. The fee is $18 for students and $36 for
staff. Enrollment is limited to 12. For more info. call 763-4025.
Films
CFT-Death in Venice, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
AAFC-Dance Craze, 7 & 8:30 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
CG-The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, 7 p.m., The Night of the Hunter, .8 p.m.,
Lorch.
Performances
S.O.A.P., Union Arts Program - Concert of the Month, Jeffrey Bradetich
on double bass, 8 p.m., Pendelton Rm.
School of Music - Percussion Students Recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Speakers
Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering-"Smale's Work on
the Expected Number' of Steps in the Samplex Algorithm," Prof. Carl
Simon, 3-4 p.m., 229 W. Engineering.
Center for Afro-American and African Studies - "Capitalism and racial
domination in South Africa" with Stanley Trapido, William Beinart &
Frederic Cooper, 4 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall, 4th floor.
L.S.A.- Prof. Heiko Oberman, "The Rise of Anti-Semitism in the 16th
Century," 8p.m., Rackham ampitheater.
Display Ad department - "Plant Closings and Apartheid: The Steel Con-
nection by Jemedari Kamara," 12 p.m., International Center, 603 E.
Madison.
The Rudolf Steiner Institute of the Great Lakes Area - "The threefold
Nature of Man," Emer. Prof. E. Katz, 8-10 p.m., 1923 Geddes.
Computing Center - "MTS Command Language," by CC Counseling
Staff, 12:10-1 p.m., 1011 NUBS, "Welcome to MTS" by Bob Blue & Forest
Hartman, 7-8:30 p.m., 140 BSAD, "Introduction to the Ontel Terminal",
Videotape, 7-9 p.m. (continuous showings), 120 UGLi.
Near Eastern & North African Studies-"Arabic Culture at Crossroads"
by Phil. Habil. Bassam Tibi (lecture given in Arabic), 2 p.m., B137 MLB.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Go Club - 7-11 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
CEW-Informal drop-in, 12-1:30 p.m., Job Hunt Club, Cntr. Library.
Students Counseling Office-Mass meeting, 6:30 p.m., 1018 Angell Hall.
Ann Arbor Stroke Club - Organizational meeting, 7-9 p.m., Com-
municative Disorders Clinic, VV Bldg., 1111 E. Catherine.
Women of University Faculty '- Dinner, 6 p.m., program 7:30 p.m.,
Glacier Hills Retirement Center, 1200 Earhart Rd.
Baptist Student Union - First meeting, 7 p.m., 2435 Mason Hall.
Bioengineering Program-4-5 p.m.,. Coffee, 3:30 p.m., 1042 E.
Engineering.
Hillel-Grad. students wine & cheese party, 8:30 p.m., Hillel, 1429 Hill.
Amnesty Internatonal Group 61-general meeting, 7 p.m., Crofoot Rm.,
Michigan Union.
Glee Club - Mass meeting, 7 p.m., Anderson Rm., Michigan Union.
Pre-Med-mass meeting for new students, 12-1 p.m., Aud. B, Angell Hall.
Napoleon Soaring Club - business meeting, 7:30 p.m., Ann Arbor Airport.
Inter-Fraternity Counsel - first meeting, 7 p.m., Conference Rm. 4,
Michigan Union.

Imirron ai can i er

0
11 "

.I AL ALuin - L -IL I n. JL I -ML w .ll I LF -L.ML46oW AL '% JR. AL - AL- .

By FANNIE WEINSTEIN
Stressing that financial problems are
plaguing colleges and universities
nationwide, University Vice President
for Academic Affairs Billy Frye offered
several solutions for this University at
yesterday's LSA faculty meeting.
"The conditions that we face should
not be viewed as unique to us," Frye
said. "It is certainly a national problem
... and is affecting all of us in the same
way.~
ALTHOUGH the budget crisis is im-
mediate, the University can't lose sight
of the future in a scramble to solve it,

Frye told about 200 LSA faculty mem-
bers, many new to the University.
"In the past two or three years it has
become increasingly clear that we can-
not cope with these types of problems
without making dramatic adjustmen-
ts," he said.
"Painfully," he added, "we've
reduced our cost by not letting salaries
keep pace."~
WHILE.A top priority for the Univer-
sity is regaining lost state aid, the
problem goes beyond funds, according
to Frye.
See FRYE, Page 7

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