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September 12, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

New lottery system
splits dorm cliques

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 12, 1982-Paqe 5

(Continued from Page 1)
Kozlow and Michael acknowledged
the housing advisor's argument, but
stuck to their guns: The new system
favors out-of-state students at a state
university, they said.
"I think they should give first priority
to those who took the time to drive it up.
"The new system just favors the
minority number of students from out
of state. If they're not equal to us in
number, why should they be given
priority," Michael said.
ONE BENEFIT of the new lottery
system is that it allows for more of a
balance between in-stae and out-of-
state students in certain dorms, Man-
tyk said. Previously, the Hill dorms
were mostly populated with suburban
Detroit residents, she added.
Some Hill dorm students said they felt
the mix at Markley, Mosher Jordan,
Alice Lloyd, Stockwell, and Couzens
was satisfactory in the past, and needed
no changing.
"Maybe the new system helps the
dorm be more diverse, but you'd still
meet new people ... I would anyway,"
said one West Bloomfield freshperson,
who asked not to be identified after she
Ā§poke.
-UPPERCLASSMEN who had a
chance to reflect on their dorm living
experiences see the Hill residence halls
as a very homogeneous, stagnating
"Econ. move
may push
CRISP out
(Continued from Page 1)
back to work" on the ninth and tenth
floors of the former hospital, nearly
nine months after the fire.
"It's inconvenient and far away from
campus, but- it's tolerable. On the
whole, we're lucky," he said.
ECONOMICS Professor George
Johnson said he finds the quarters
somewhat less tolerable: "I would like
to get out of that place as fast as
possible," Johnson said.
"The department hangs together,"
he said, "but we had a lot of losses."
Stafford said visiting faculty have to
share offices at the former hospital, a
situation he termed "tight."
With faculty forced to commute 20
minutes to- and from classes, and
graduate economics students scattered
across central campus, the current
location is a "disaster if you want to
take an economics "class," Stafford
said.
IN LORCH HALL though, "there cer-
tainly is space if it's redesigned," he
' added.
Although no bids have been taken for
the job of remodeling the building, Staf-
ford said it would cost in the range of $1
million to $2 million dollars.
Insurance money would be used for
the six month project, Stafford said,
and no construction would take place
until May, 1983.
The building needs work on its cen-
tral ventilating system to make it more
energy-efficient, and some structural
ork, such as partitioning a few rooms,
he said.
A move to Lorch Hall would plut the
department in an even better position
than it had had in the old economics
building, according to Stafford.

group.
"The stigma associated with MoJo
and Markley, that it is a dorm for white,
middle-class Jews, whether or not the
residents want to believe it, caters to
that group," commented a male senior
who also asked not to be named.
"It doesn't matter if they're from
Roslyn, New York or West Bloomfield,
it's the same group of people," he ad-
ded.
Nate Resnick, an LSA senior who
lived in MoJo, said the new lottery is a
good way to avoid clinging to old high
school friends.
"It was an extremely safe and secure
environment (living in MoJo). I think
the new system is good," he said.

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