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September 12, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-12

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Page 2-Sunday, September 12, 1982-The Michigan Daily
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ORIENTAL RUGS
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WALL HANGING-TABLECLOTH
HAN DCRAFT (Jewelry, Pipes, etc.)

Surgeon says
poverty affects
cancer rates

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SEATTLE (AP)- American blacks
are less likely than whites to survive a
bout with cancer and a surgeon who
works in Harlem said yesterday the dif-
ference seems rooted in poverty.
"The bottom line of this problem
seems to be socio-economic rather than
race," said Dr. Harold Freeman, chief
of surgery at Harlem Hospital Center in
New York.
"It becomes racial because there are
more poor people among some ethnic
groups," he said, adding that more than
a third of blacks are below poverty
level compared to 11 percent of whites.
FREEMAN SAID he spent the past 15
years in Harlem and worked before
that in middle-class Manhattan, "so I
have had a chance to compare the two
and there was a striking difference.'
He said only one in five cancer
patients survived at the turn of the cen-
tury. In 1982, "nearly half of patients
with cancer survive five years. This is a
tremendous achievement, but there are
segments of the population that still live
as though they are back in 1900. Where I
work is one of those areas.'
Freeman told a session of the 13th In-
ternational Cancer Congress that once
cancer is diagnosed, most people of all
incomes receive good treatment. But,

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he said, "socio-economic differences..,;
lead to later diagnosis of the disease"
and therefore limit success of treat-
ment.
But when survival priorities include
whether you are going to even eat on a
given day, those priorities take
precedence," he said. Many im-
poverished people, therefore, see doc-
tors only vWith serious emergencies and
rarely receive diagnostic tests.
FREEMAN ALSO noted that
Medicaid, which finances medical care
for the poor, does not pay for routine
screening.
Because the biggest problem is get-
ting the poor of any race to seek
diagnostic tests that could save their
lives, the 'Harlem hospital is trying
"outreach from the inside." Freeman
said patients who show up at the
emergency room with non-cancer
problems are automatically tested for
certain cancers if at higher risk
because of sex or age.
After two years "with some success,"
the concept should be tried on a broader
scale, Freeman said.
He also stressed the need for
education among impoverished groups,
but warned it must take account of
ethnic and cultural differences.
He said a breast examination center
established in Harlem was launched
with considerable mass advertising but
"we found that half of the women came
in after being told about it by another
individual. And we have not reached
the (very poor) population we were
aiming for."
"A lot of information on television
and so forth is really directed towards
people who are educated," which
rarely includes the poor, he said.

Use Daily
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LSA Student Government
POSITIONS AVAILABLE

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Death penalty backers fight on
LANSING- The State Court of Appeals refused to set aside a spot for the
death penalty proposal on the November ballot and backers of the con-
troversial issue say they will appeal the decision.
Supporters of reinstating the death penalty said they would file an
emergency appeal with the state Supreme Court.
A three judge panel Friday barred the proposed constitutional amendment
from the ballot by upholding a Board of State Canvassers ruling. Last mon-
th, the board had maintained that there were not enough valid signatures on
the petitions to allow it to be placed on the ballot.
Oakland County Prosecutor L. Brooks Patterson, a strong advocate of the
death penalty and Republican candidate for attorney general said the
decision was, "disappointing," but was not a "rejection or setback."
He added that it merely "clears the way to the Supreme Court."
Reagan quiet on freeze vote
WASHINGTON- After a lengthy internal debate, the Reagan ad-
ministration is refusing to take a stand on a controversial nuclear freeze
referendum facing Wisconsin voters Tuesday, on the ground that its wording
is ambiguous.
A revised State Department position, set forth late last week, said the
question on the Wisconsin ballot alludes to the desirability of both a "nuclear
weapons moratorium and reduction" without specifying which should
come first.
The administration's refusal to take a stand on the Wisconsin referendum
would seem to leave in doubt-the significance of Tuesday's vote, regardless
of the outcome.
Moreover, by declining to oppose the resolution, the administration would
spare itself political embarrassment if Wisconsin voters, as expected, en-
dorse a nuclear freeze.
Numerous town, city and county governments around the country have
supported the concept of a freeze on nuclear weapons, but never has the
issue been the subject of a statewide referendum until Tuesday. However, in
addition to Wisconsin next week, eight more states will vote on nuclear
freeze resolutions in the November elections-California, Arizona, Oregon,
North Dakota, Montana, Michigan, Rhode Island and New Jersey.
Philippine leader to visit U;S.
MANILA, Philippines- President Ferdinand Marcos is expected to
discuss trade issues and use of U.S. military bases in the Philippines this
week on this first state visit to the United States in 16 years.
America is the country's closest military ally, biggest trading partner and
haven for some of its harshest government critics.
Marcos spent part of his 65th birthday yesterday preparing speeches for
his trip, which starts Tuesday. The exact itinerary was kept secret for
security reasons but was expected, besides Washington, to include New
York, Los Angeles, Honolulu and Mobile, Ala.
Marcos and his increasingly influential wife, Imelda, 53, are to meet;
President Reagan at the White House on Thursday.
The cool relations Marcos encountered during the Carter administration
have visibly warmed during the Reagan presidency.
Vice President George Bush told Marcos at his inauguration last year:
"We love your adherence to democratic principles and to democratic
processes and we will not leave you in isolation."
His trip comes 10 years after Marcos declared martial law and pushed the
Philippines away from the American-style democracy that would have
allowed him only one more year as president.
Corona's retrial goes to jury
HAYWARD, Calif.- The seven-month-old retrial of Juan Corona, accused
of hacking to death 25 farm laborers who had drifted from one harvest to
another, is expected to go to the jury tomorrow.
If acquitted, the 48-year-old Mexican national would leave jail for the first
time since May 26, 1971, when he was taken from his Yuba City home and
charged with the killings.
If convicted again, he would be eligible for immediate parole con-
sideration by the state Board of Prison Terms because of time served.
Corona was convicted in January 1973, and 25 consecutive life sentences
were imposed. Five years later, however, a new trial was ordered by a state
appeals court that ruled the first defense inadequate.
At the same time, the three-judge panel said, "the evidence proving ap-
pellant's (Corona's) guilt, although circumstantial, was overwhelming."
Iraqi planes sink
another Iranian ship
Iraqi warplanes sank an Iranian naval vessel in the Persian Gulf near the
Ardashir oil fields yesterday, bringing to four the number of ships destroyed
in as many days, the state-run Iraqi News Agency reported.
"A formation of Iraqi airforce attacked an enemy naval target, scoring a
direct hit that destroyed and sunk it," the agency reported, quoting a
military spokesman.
All planes returned safely to base, the agency said. As has become
customary, no details were released concerning the type or nationality of the

vessel sunk.
The agency earlier reported a large oil tanker was set fire'Friday near the
Iranian port of Beshire while two unidentified Iranian naval targets were
sunk Wednesday and Thursday near the Ardashir oil fields.
Vol. XCIII, No. 4
Sunday, September 12,,1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Satursay mor-
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Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
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The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
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News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 764-0562; Circulation,
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Editor-in-chief .......................DAVID MEYER
Managing Editor ..................PAMELA KRAMER
News Editor . ..................ANDREW CHAPMAN
Student Affairs Editor ...........ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor ....................MARK GINDIN
Opinion Page Editors ..................JULIE HINDS
CHARLES THOMSON
Arts/Magazine Editors ......... RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
Associate Arts/Magazine Editor ......... BEN TICHO
Sports Editor..................BOB WOJNOWSKI
Associate Sports Editors.............. BARB BARKER

SPORTS STAFF: Jesse Barkin, Tam Bentley, Randy
Berger, Jeff Bergida, Mike Bradley. Joe Chapelle.
Laura Clark, Richard Demak, Jim Dworman, Obvid
Forman, Chris Gerbasi, Paul Helgren, Matt Henehan,
Chuck Jaffe, Steve Kamen, Robin Kopilnick, Doug
Levy, Mike McGraw. Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman.
Jeff Quicksilver, Jim Thompson, Karl Wheatley, Chris
Wilson, Chuck Whitman.
BUSINESS
Business Manager .............. JOSEPH G. BRODA
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