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September 09, 1982 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-09-09

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 9, 1982-Page 11
'U' bends investment
policy on apar hdi
(Contined from Page 9)
tee that annually reviews Herbert's however, two board member
evaluation, mistakenly believed Herbert questioned why the University kept iis
headed a committee to keep tabs on the investments if the companies did,. r$t
University's progress. There is no such meet up to standards.
committee. Herbert and his assistant "We're falling down on our
alone monitor the companies. tives," said Regent Nellie Varner (D-
BUSINESS School Prof. Thomas Detroit), "We have a policy that
Giles, another member of the faculty workable, and it's good enough that we
group, said that his committee's in- can follow it."
terest was strictly financial. Summing up the way in which the
"There may be people in the world University completes its analysis,
who can indulge themselves in these Regent James Water (D-Muskegon)
questions," he said, "but I'm not sure said last spring, "It seems like (they
we'll be able to afford to." administration) relies completely on
At the March Regents meeting, what the company says."

Doily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER .
Happy to be here
Amid all the confusion and hassles involved with moving in at the beginning of a new school year, at least one University newcomer finds something to smile about.
5-year plan shifts resources to fight budget crunch

POSTERS
POSTERS
POSTERS
POSTERS
POSTERS
POSTERS
Like You've Never Seen!

(Continued from Page 1)
decided to take tle University's fate in-
-to its own hands-in part through the
.five-year plan.
ABOUT HALF of the $20 million in
cuts will be achieved through across-
the-board reductions in the budgets of
many University divisions, Frye said,
and the other half will come through
heavy cuts in selected schools, colleges,
and non-academic units.
The latter method is in keeping with
'University President Harold Shapiro's
*vision of a "smaller but better" in-
stitution, which calls for the paring
down of certain parts of the University
'in order to maintain or improve the
quality of others.
The $20 million, which will be collec-
ted over a five-year period, will be
redistributed to those areas the ad-
ministration has designated as "high
priority."
CONTROVERSY surrounds both ends
of the plan. The possibility of deep
budget cuts in-or even elimination of-
certain schools and colleges strikes
fear in both students and faculty mem-
bers. The professors and students in the
.schools under review have not massed
in protest yet, but disenchantment
among several elements of the Univer-
sity community is growing.
The reallocation process also has
come under criticism. Many student
leaders are questioning some of the
priority areas designated by the ad-
ministration.
And some faculty members argued
. over the summer that the ad-
ministration improperly has taken the
faculty's consent to the general
"smaller but better" theory as a man-
date for all its specific reduction and
reallocation plans.
Although Frye has said the priority
areas will be decided by "widespread
deliberation within the University," he
already is making plans for
reallocating money into six areas he
outlined in February.
THOSE AREAS are: Faculty and
staff salary improvements, better in-
centives for research and an improved
research environment, better incen-
tives for undergraduate teaching, the
financial ability to respond to new in-

tellectuial developments, better support
for instructional and research equip-
ment, and a higher level of merit-based
support for graduate students.
But Frye acknowledges that not all of
the priority areas he suggested will
receive support in the five-year plan.
"I tried to make it clear that with the
$20 million we can not deal with all the
priority areas," the University's chief
budget officer said. "If we try to spread
our money too thin, we won't help any
of them."
FRYE SAID he plans to reallocate
most of the $5 million in cuts made un-
der the plan last spring toward this
year's faculty salary program.
"There can be no more urgent
priority for using the five-year plan
money," Frye said.
There has been great concern in the
University community over the last few
years that top faculty members would
begin to accept more lucrative job of-
fers at other educational institutions or
in private industry. Professors may
wonder if the state's economy will ever
recover adequately to cover acceptable
pay raises.
Frye said a great exodus has not
begun yet, but it could if faculty
salaries continue to lose ground to in-
flation.
NOW, SIX months into the plan, with
reviews in the process or completed for
three schools and three non-academic
units, student leaders are concerned
about the lack of public debate on the
priority areas outlined by Frye.
Over the summer, Jamie Moeller, a
1982 University graduate and former
member of the top faculty and student
budget committee, warned that the
University community must become
more vocal about what it considers to
be priority areas or "it will become in-
creasingly likely that the areas to
receive additional funding will be those
determined solely by Frye."
The Michigan Student Assembly has
proposed that a public forum be set up
for discussion of the priority areas.
Frye said it was always his intention to
put his priority list up for public con-
sideration. He said a public forum will
be planned for the fall.
But before that meeting takes place,
$5 million will already have been

reallocated toward faculty salaries,
Frye said.
EVEN ON that issue, there has been
some skepticism both in Ann Arbor and
nationwide over whether universities'
top priorities need to be salaries. There
is little market for professors in many
disciplines, so the odds of a mass depar-
ture from the English Department, for
example, is unlikely.
Some question whether it is worth the
trauma of cutting other programs in
order to save the more "marketable"
faculty, such as those in economics,
pharmacy, engineering, business, and
computer science.
A second area that Frye said he con-
siders to be extremely important is the
level of merit-based graduate aid at the
University.
"OUR ABILITY to attract outstand-
ing graduate students is almost as im-
portant as attracting outstanding
faculty," Frye said.
It is unlikely many students will
argue with that point.
But students have long feared the
possible implications of increased
research budgets, another five-year
plan priority. They are afraid that as
professors put-more time into research,
there will be less time left for teaching.
The administration counters that bet-
ter research leads to better teaching, as
professors are better equipped to
discuss their subjects. In addition,
research contributes highly to graduate
student support.
ALTHOUGH the faculty approved the

idea of a "smaller but better" in-
stitution in 1981, the realities of budget
cutting have given many second
thoughts on the question.
As they see departments and possibly
even entire schools eliminated, some
members of the faculty are urging the
University to consider if the financial
problems could be better handled by
everyone tightening their belts a little
more rather than by deep selective
cuts.
Another concern is what will happen
to tenured faculty in schools that are
reduced or eliminated.
b Top administrators still hope to be
able to relocate all tenured faculty
within the University, but there is still a
possibility some will be laid off.
"The damage (layoffs) would do to
our sense of collegiality and our con-
fidence in the future of the University,"
Frye stated when he introduced the
plan in February, "would more than of-
fset any benefits we expect from this
plan."

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COLLEGE WORK-STUDY
JOB FAIR
All students with 1982-83 Work-Study awards are
eligible to attend. Come and talk with Work-Study
employers about job opportunities.
ALL WORK-STUDY EMPLOYERS HAVE BEEN INVITED
BRING YOUR AWARD NOTICE I

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