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January 15, 1982 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Commi
By LISA SPECTOR
After nearly five months of review, a faculty-
student panel will recommend today that the
University Law School faculty preserve the
school's clinical law program, but with
significant structural changes and a reduction
in the clinic's overall budget.
The Clinical Education program provides
students with an opportunity to represent ac-
tual clients and give genuine legal advice under
the supervision of an instructor for academic
credit.
The committee's proposal calls for the school
to combine two courses-Clinical Law I (a
class in general practical law) and Child Ad-
vocacy 'Clinic (a more specific course)-into
one class to reduce demands on staff and finan-
ces.
The proposal also suggested that the Law-

1 ~J

1 -

tee proposes t
School allocate $125,000 from its budget to the and preservation of the clinic requires that it
program,, a 25 percent increase. The Law clearly be "worthwhile."
School currently provides $100,000 to the "We have two good clinics going and we want
clinical program, but two key grants, one from to keep them going," Cooper said. But, he ad-
the federal government and one from a private ded, law school administrators have many
foundation, will be discontinued, so the total demands on the school's budget.
amount the program receives will be He commended the program, however,
'decreased. saying it is "a chance to achieve something not
The plan also specifies that $25,000 of the possible in the classroom."
$125,000 come from the Law School Fund, Doug Ellmann, president of the Law School
which receives its money primarily from Senate, said he was pleased with the commit-
alumni. tee's decision. He added concern, however,
The review committee, comprised of five law that combining the two programs would both
school faculty members and two law students, reduce the number of spaces available to
was established in August to examine the students and the number of faculty members
quality of the clinical courses. involved in the program at a time when the
Law School Associate Dean Edward Cooper, clinic is already over-enrolled. The new plan
a member of the review panel, said law school would reduce the number of available spaces
officials have had to develop budget priorities from 90 to 72 per semester and the number of

I

keep
faculty from three to two-and-one-ha
Committee member John Erdevig
year law student, said that even
voted with the majority opinion, he
lot more."
"Other resources were not fully e
he said, and suggested the possi
special fund for the purpose. He ci
tinued lack of support and enthusia
ding this unique program."
Erdevig said he was shooting for
ment of $180,000 to $200,000 from
School. He pointed to the increase
demand and the increase in funding
educations by other institutions tos
position.
"We want to pick up the slack and
peer institutions by increasing ou
ment to funding to innovative prog

The Michigan Daily-Friday, January 15, 1982-Page 3
law clinic
said.
alf. One dissenting committee member, Prof.
g, a second- Douglas Kahn, said he was more disturbed
though he with specification that part of the money come
wanted "a from private sources than he was with the
dollar amounts decided upon.
xhausted," If the committee's recommendation is ap-
bility of a proved by the Law School faculty, and then the
ted a "con- Law School dean, it would mark the first time
asm regar- that part of the Law School Fund be earmarked
for a specific form of instruction.
a commit- In a report to the committee, Kahn said the
n the Law purpose of the fund is to support short-term and
in student emergency needs. "I am very troubled by the
for clinical precedent that would be established if we begin
support his to use the Law School Fund to finance a
recurring obligation," he said.
d follow our Law School Dean Terrence Sandalow called
ar commit- the committee's decision "a careful evaluation
grams," he of the problem."

r

Ann Arbor
j obless
rate shows
largest
increase

By ANNE MYTYCH
Ann Arbor's November unem-
ployment rate showed the largest
increase in the state, the Michigan
Employment Security Commission
said yesterday.
The overall increase was 3.3 per-
cent, rising from 7.6 percent in Oc-
tober to 10.9 percent in November.
The total Michigan unemployment
rate increased only .3 percent.
MESC attributed the city's in-
crease in part to layoffs in the tran-
sportation equipment industry in the
Ann Arbor- Ypsilanti area.
FIGURES FROM all area in-
dustries were not available, but
Ford Motor Company spokesman
Jim Allen said the Ford plant in
Roseville laid off 100 employees this
week.
Matina Cocoves, Ann Arbor MESC
manager, attributed the citys
unemployment rate increase in part
to another factor. She said that
because the city MESC office used to

have one of the lowest rates of
unemployment, the Ann Arbor office
would accept job hunters from other
areas. In past months, however,
Ann Arbor job openings have
declined. The increased number of
out-of-town job hunters combined
with the decrease in job openings
helped create Ann Arbor's unusually
high unemployment rate in Novem-
ber, Cocoves said.
In addition to layoffs in major
plants, several small plants are
closing, adding to the city's overall
unemployment rate, she said.
Unemployment rates rose in four
other Michigan labor markets in
November, the MESC reported
yesterday.
MESC Director Martin Taylor
said the unemployment rate drop-
ped in the other eight state areas,
primarily due to declines in the
number of workers in the labor for-
ce, rather than any real gains in em-
ployment.

(Continued from Page 1)
items, allowing them to keep costs for
other items down.
SHE ESTIMATES that without this
freedom, the U-Cellar would have been
unable to absorb the rent increase
demanded by the Union as well as their
share of the renovation costs without
going bankrupt within two to three
years.
"(Cianciola) had to know that if he
was any sort of a good businessman,"
she said.
"It was a very sadsand very
frustrating thing," she said of the
store's decision to move. "I'm sorry
that it happened. But our decision was
in the interests of the students."
"IN MY HEART I don't want to
leave," Caballero said. "But he (Cian-
ciola) refused to give us protection.'
That was the only thing we had to have.
"It's not a happy situation," she said.
The decision to move came after

years of negotiation following the ex-
piration of the U-Cellar's last long-term
lease with the University in November
1978. The store has been operating on a
month-to-month lease since that time.
NEGOTIATIONS between the U-
Cellar and the Union heated up early
last term when Cianciola - in ani at-
tempt to solidify plans for the Union
renovation project - ordered the store
to commit itself by October 15 to
remaining in the Union or begin plans

to move out. Store officials, agreed to
remain on the condition that there
would be further negotiation.
In December, Cianciola reported
agreement was imminent.
But Wednesday night, U-Cellar direc-
tors defied another ultimatum from
Cianciola demanding that they either
move out by March 1, sign a lease he
declared to be in "final" form, or agree
to a modified month-to-month lease.

U -Cellar relocation imminent

SHOE & BOOT
SALE.
Now in Progress
Mens and Women'S
Bass-Frye-Timberland
Florsheim-Clark
Sebago-Dexter
ALL Winter Boots on Sale!!

-HAPPENINGS] Arsonists set fire

,.

to Economics Bldg.

HIGHLIGHT
A public hearing on the future of the Economics Building will be held today
from 2-4 p.m. in the Regents Room, Fleming Administration Building. If you
want to voice your opinion at the hearing, call LeReine Stevens at 764-3402 to
schedule a time.
FILMS
Alt. Act.-Play it Again Sam, 7,8:40, 10:20 p.m., Nat. Sci.
AAFC-Enter the Dragon, 7, 10:20 p.m., MLB 4.
AAFC-Attack of the kung Fu Girls, 8:45, MLB 4.
Cinema Guild-The Big Sleep, 7, 9p.m., Lorch Hall.
Cinema II-Coal Miner's Daughter, 7, 9:15 p.m., Aud. A.
CFT-Woodstock, 3;30,7, 10:15p.m., Michigan Theatre..
Gargoyle Films-King Hearts and Coronets, 7, 9p.m., Hutchins Hall.
MEETINGS
University Duplicate Bridge Club-open game, 7:30 p.m., Michigan
League.
k Int'l Student Fellowhsip-Mtg., 7 p.m., 4100 Nixon Rd.
CEW-Single mother's support group, 11 p.m., 2nd floor of Huron Valley
National Bank.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class-special speaker, Pastor S. Y. Kou, 7:30
p.m., Univ: Reformed Church.
PERFORMANCES
Musical Society-The Joffrey II Dancers, 8p.m., Power Center.
School of Music-Dances for Two-Susan Matheke, Willie Feuer,
Trueblood Theatre, 8 p.m.; Piano Four-Hands Recital-James Lyke, Reid
Alexander; 8 p.m., Recital Hall, Piano Recital, Jon Gonder, DMA, 8 p.m.,
Rackham Assembly Hall.
SPEAKERS
South & Southeast Asian Studies-Peter Bertocci, "The Bangladesh Elec-
tions, November 1981: Implications for the Eighties," 12 p.m., Commons
Rm., Lane Hall.
Guild House-John Powell, "The Continuation of Dr. King's Vision in the
80's," 12 p.m., 802 Monroe.
School of Education-Ton Beekman, "Growing Up: An Existential View,"
2-4 p.m., 1211 SEB.
Residential College-James Wessman, "Peasants, Capitalists, & the
State: Mexico's Changing Agricultural Policy & the Hungarian Project," 4-6
p.m., 126 E. Quad.
EMY-Gwendolyn Brooks, poetry reading, 8 p.m., Peace Auditorium,
Eastern Michigan University.
AstroFest 106-Jim Louden, "Telescopes & How They Work,"; The
Universe From Palomar; Univ. Lowbrow Astronomers, amateur-telescope
exhibit, 7:30 p.m., MLB 3.
U.S.I.-Oneg Shabbat, "The Falashas," 8:30 p.m., 2010 Washtenaw.
MISCELLANEOUS
Hillel-Reform Group Shabbat Dinner, 6:30 p.m.; Shabbat services; Orth.
5:05 p.m., COnserv. 5:15 p.m., Dinner 6:15 p.m., 815 S. State No. 4.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Comm.-Celebration of Birthday,
Bethel A.M.E. Church; 7 p.m., 900 Plum St.
Tau Beta Pi-TG at Rick's American Cafe, starting at 3:30 p.m.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
MICHIGANj
The STUDENTI
ASSEMBLY/
is now accepting applications
for the position of
Treasurer & Chief Financial Officer

(Continued from Page 1)
the Industrial Risk Insurers company.
"The cause of a fire is not material to
insurance recovery," Ryan said.
A reward of up to $2,000 has been of-
fered for information leading to the
arrest and conviction of the guilty party
or parties. Anyone with information
should call Arson Control, collect, at
(517) 322-0469.
Today at 2 p.m., Economics Depar-
tment faculty members and others
within the University community will
meet in the Regents Room of the
Fleming Administration Building to

discuss the future of the charred
Economics Building. Although many
within the department feel the exterior
walls should be saved and the building
restored, Chairman Stafford said the
official department view is that a new
building will be needed.
"The building just doesn't have that
much interior volume," he said. Con-
sidering the renovations°needed to
bring a restored structure,-up to local
and state fire codes, "the space
available would be insufficient to house
the department."
burglarized
.
Anaprteninlethet.800sburlockzof
sometime between Dec. 23 and Jan. 13,
police said yesterday. Someone pried
open the door and took stereo equip-
ment, the value of which was not
determined.
Snow increases
auto crashes
Snowy roads led to a score of auto ac-
cidents Wednesday, according to police
reports. There were 23 crack-ups, but
only one involved an injury serious
enough to require hospitalization.

CAMPU
619 E. Lib

S S
erty 662
MASTER CARD-VISA-AMERICAN EXPRESS

HOP
-0266

. I I

in MAPLE VILLAGE SHPPG CTER
BARGAINSHOWS $2.50 $Before 4aPm Mon-FrI; Before 3 PM Set-Sdn
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DAN 7:15 9:20 Penniet
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AV CO F vtias> >
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tlr --

Disturbance at
Dooley's
A disturbance in a campus-area bar
led to the arrest of one man on charges
of drunk and disorderly conduct, police
said yesterday.
Two apparently intoxicated men en-
tered Dooley's, 310 Maynard St., Wed-
nesday evening and tried to start fights,
police said. A bartender asked the men
to leave, but they refused.
Police were called, and the men had
to be restrained until officers arrived,
police said. One man, who continued to
fight, was arrested. Police did not iden-
tify the suspect.

$2,00 i'Cream dreami $2.00
In space no oneTHE
can hear you scream. AMIYVILLE
A LlI E N HORROR
'li Q ...RELEASED BVAMERICAN'NTERNATIONAL
JIMI amovieI Andy Warhol's
HENDRIX DRACULA'
at MANN at MIDNIGHT for $2
N -A $j50 SAT, SUN $1.50
" ER .tIl 6:00 (except "REDS")
ZINDIVIDUAL THEA TRES
5tb A.eatib" 's'71'700"A CLASSIC LOVE STORY"
Port burlesque, part satire -Ann Arbor News
FELLINI
CITY OF WOMEN Warren Beatty
Diane Keaton
Jack
Nicholson
REDS"
$2.50 til 6:00
Fri-6:30, 10:55; Mon-7:00, 9:30 (R) Fri-8:30; Mon-8:00 (PG)
Sat, Sun-1:50, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Sat, Sun-1:00, 4:45, 8:30
ANN ARBOR THEATRE CHEAP FLICKS
AT MIDNIGHT

I Ur I

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Frid alENT
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Is

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00FRI. & SAT.
only $2.00
at 12:00 Mid
truly beautiful and erotic
a step above the ordinary'
HUSTLEF
Ch~n 5od

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FEA TURING

THE FLEXIBLES

R

S JOOSAT only
at 12:00
The 3
Stooges
Moe, Larry,
Curly
h1IOVIS AMAY*Et

January 15-8:30 P.M.
Cover $1.00
DRINK SPECIALS
Don't Mi The TACOl TAEatT,...i.......,..i

SNEAK PREVIEW

I

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