100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1982 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SPORTS

4.
,_a.

The Michigan Daily

Thursday, January 14, 1982

Page"T

m

Cellar dwellers.*

'M' cagers battle Knight's Hoosiers
as teams seek first conference win

By LARRY FREED
As if it weren't enough that the
Michigan cagers are struggling with
seven consecutive losses and a 1-9
record, for the third consecutive game,
they must also face a team that is
riding a long losing streak. A team that
is itching for a win.
This time, coach Bill Frieder and his
team must face the defending Big Ten
and national champion Indiana
Hoosiers, who are stinging from a 75-61
loss at Northwestern last Saturday. The
loss, coupled with the Hoosiers' 0-2 con-
ference mark and four-game losing

skein, will no doubt make Indiana even
tougher to beat in its home arena.
"THEY'RE always tough in
Bloomington," Frieder remarked. "I
still look for them to be a contender. On
the other hand, they do make tur-
novers."
The Hoosiers' inexperience has
shown up in the box scores of their
opening two league contests. Against
Michigan State and Northwestern they
committed a total of 54 turnovers,
which resulted in Indiana joining
Michigan in the conference cellar.

THE MAIN reason for the many
Hoosier miscues, as Frieder will attest
for his own ball club, is the young star-
ting lineup Knight puts on the court.
Freshmen Uwe Blab (7-2), John
Flowers (6-9), and Dan Dakich (6-5) are
listed as starters along with two
veterans from last year's champion-
ship team, Ted Kitchel (6-8) and Randy
Wittman (6-6). It is the sharpshooting
Kitchel who Frieder fears.
"Kitchel's a great shooter and he's
got to be stopped," said Frieder, who
remembers Keith Edmonson's 34 points
last Saturday. "We've also got to key on
the middle people."
ONE POSSIBLE strategy Frieder
suggests for shutting down the Hoosier

attack is to slow down his own team's
offense.
Another of the changes Frieder
alludes to could be the starting of 6-8
Willis Carter, who would give the
Wolverines some much-needed muscle.
Michigan currently ranks last in the
conference in rebounding differential.
For Frieder to get different results
than the previous four times on the
court, he will have to overcome two
handicaps: depth and an angry Knight.
The Hoosiers have two experienced
players coming off the bench in Jim
Thomas and Steve Bouchie, while
Frieder has a relatively lean bench led
by Leslie Rockymore, who scored a
career-high 21 points in his last outing.

I

-.Michigan Basketball Statistics

I

I

Plyer
Turner ..............................
Garner .............................
'lockymore............................
Peron ..............................
Hopson ............. .... .........
James ..................... ...
Pelekondas......... ..........
4"ar ............................
Hall......... ...............
HWauidhngton...............
Brown........... ............
Rudy ............................
TOTALS
MICHIGAN.................. ...
Goponents.....................
*No longer with team.
GRAPPLER GI

G-S
10-10
10-10
10-3
10-10
10-7
7.4
10-
10-0
5-0
3-0
5-0
10
10
10'

FG/A
54/124,
53/121
44/80
39/81
30/59
23/50
18/35
14/33
1/3
0/2
0/0
0/1

Pct
.435
.438
.550
.481
.508
.460
.514
.424
.8333
.000
.000
.000

FT/A
20/41
19/28
10/14
10/18
10/20
8/11
14/16
2/4
0/0
0/0
0/0
0/0

Pct Reb.-Avg.
.488 19-1.9
.679 73-7.3
.714 28-2.8
.556 66-.6
.500 52-5.2
.727 17-2.4
.875 11-1.1
.500 16-1.6
.000 2-0.4
.000 2.0.7
.000 1-0.2
.000 0-0.0

A
48
11
6
10
7
5
35
1
0
0
0
0

Pts.
128
125
98
88
70
54
50
30
2
0
0
0

Avg.
12.8
12.5
9.8
8.8
7.0
7.7
5.0
3.0
0.4
0.0
0.0
0.0

LINEUPS

MICHIGAN (1-9)

INDIANA (6-5)

(23)
(45)'
(52):
(25)
(32)

Dean Hopson (6-7).... .
Thad Garner (6-7) ..... .
Ike Person (6-7) ........
Eric Turner (6-3)..... .
Dan Pelekoudas (6-1) ..

F
F
C
G
G

..... (6-9) John Flowers
........(6-8) Ted Kitchel
..........(7-2) Uwe Blab
....... (6-5) Dan Dakich
... (6-6) Randy Wittman

(42)
(30)
(33)
(11)
(24)

276/589 .469 93/152 .612 316-31.6 123 645 64.5
268/520 .515 152/223 .682 326-32.6 135 688 68.8

GAME TIME & SITE: 7:35 p.m., Assembly Hall, Bloomington.
RADIO: WAAM-AM 1600, WWJ-AM 95, WUOM-FM 91.7.

VES 'M' UPPER WEIGHT EDGE

McKay rebounds from accident

By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
As a recent wrestling practice came
to a close, Michigan grapplers Pat
McKay and Kirk Trost were in the mid-
de of the mat battling each other with
great intensity. McKay was in control,
moving the freshman Trost around at
will.
Yetthe fact that McKay can wrestle,
much less wrestle with prowess, is a
miracle. "I am very lucky to be alive,"
said McKay.
M"CKAY, A 190-pound senior from
Warren, was nearly killed last April 29,
when he was hit by an automobile just
outside his house. "It was about 11:00
p.m. and I had just left my house with a
friend," he explained,, "As. we were
crossing the street the car hit me. The
car was going 40 miles an hour and I
was thrown fifteen feet into the air.
When I came down, my right shoulder
Sbit the windshield.
"Fortunately, the car hit only my left
leg; if it had hit both legs, I would have
gone under the car and been killed," he
said. "The driver was drunk."
The accident left McKay with a shat-

tered fibula, a tibia cracked in two
pieces, and a broken right shoulder. He
was in a wheel chair for two months,
and a full leg cast for six and a half
months. Rehabilitation on the leg star-
ted the day the cast was removed, while
the shoulder healed nicely. And today,
McKay is training hard, aiming at a
successful Big Ten season.
"I KNOW what to expect in the Big
Ten and there shouldn't be any sur-
prises," he said. "My only real worry is
of Pete Bush at Iowa. Right now I'm
only at 65 percent, but I'm feeling
stronger every day, and my confidence
has returned."
McKay has proven himself to be a
valuable member of the Wolverine
wrestlingmteam, as evidenced by
Michigan's recent dual meets. "Most of
the meets are going to come down to our
two matches (McKay and heavyweight
Eric Kiasson)," he said. "It is impor-
tant that I win because Eric is a great
competitor who always comes
through."
Winning is certainly nothing new to
McKay. Last year he was an All-

American at 190 pounds, compiling a 22- "Everyone has been super," said

d

10-1 record along with a third-place
finish in the Big Ten. This season,
McKay has won two of three matches,
with both of his wins coming in crucial
times in close wins over Penn State and
Northwestern.

McKay. "The coaches, the training
staff, no one ever let me get down.
When I was looking for excuses, they
kept pushing me harder and harder.
I've gotten back to the point where I'm
feeling super mentally and physically."

Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROMA
MICHIGAN'S THAD GARNER (45) shoots over Wisconsin's Brad Sellers
(32) as Scott Roth (31) looks on in last Thursday's 65-63 defeat to the
Badgers. Tonight, Garner will lead the 1-9 Wolverines into Bloomington for a

contest against the Indiana Hoosiers.

Hammerin'Hank and Robinson

in Hall, of
NEW YORK (AP) - Hank Aaron, t
baseball's all-time home run king, a
Frank Robinson, the game's first bla
manager, were elected to- the Hall
Fame yesterday in their first year
eligibility.
Aaron, who hammered 755 care
home runs, shattering the record of 7
held by Babe Ruth, received 406 vot
of the 415 cast by 10-year members
the Baseball Writers Association
America. No player ever has been;
unanimous choice to the Hall.
AARON, WHOSE arrival from Atla
ta was delayed several hours by sno
said he was not disappointed by r
receiving a unanimous vote.
"I certainly wanted to be
unanimous choice, but I realized that
other player has ever received all of t]
votes," he said, adding that he w
happy to have received a higher pe
centage of votes than anybody besid
Ty Cobb.
Aaron said his biggest thrill
baseball was not breaking Babe Ruth
home run record but rather winning t
Most Valuable Player award in t
National League in 1957, when he 14
the Milwaukee Braves to victory in t
World Series.
ROBINSON, THE only man to -w
the Most Valuable Player Award
both the National and Americi
Leagues, and like Aaron, one
baseball's most feared sluggers for tv
decades, received 370 votes. A play
needed 312 for election, or 75 percent
the voting board.
Aaron and Robinson became the 1
and 13th members to win election to 1

Fame oftr
he Hall of Fame in their first year on the
nd ballot. Both retired following the 1975
ck season.
of Aaron and Robinson will be inducted
of into the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown,
N.Y. Aug. 1.
er AARON'S 406 votes represented the
14
e ~

ballot

cher Juan Marichal, who missed election
by only seven votes. He received 305 in
his second year on the ballot, 72 more
than he got last year. But his percen-
tage of 73.4 fell just short of the 75 per-
cent required.
No other candidate came close,
althoughtseveral made important gains
in the vote.
Fourth in the balloting was slugger
Harmon Killebrew with 246, followed by
relief ace Hoyt Wilhelm with 236.

All South Quad Alumni
are welcome to attend
The Quads
S Oth ANNIVERSARY
CELESRATION
Jan. 14: Movie Night, 9 p.m.
Jan. 16: Alumni Reception
Zp.m.
Jan. 16: Dance, 9 p.m.

PUBLIC HEARING
Future of the
Economics Building
2-4 pm Friday, January 15
Regents Room, Fleming Administration Building
The principal issue at this time is whether to attempt to
reserve the old building. To do so would involve costs of (a)
between $25,000-$50,000 to shore up the wall until that
decision can be made; (b) a "premium" of at least $500,000 for
restoration in comparison, with construction of equivalent
space.
Anyone who wishes to present comments should call
La Reine Stevens, 764-3402.

Aaron
... nearly unanimous pick
second highest vote total ever and the
second best election percentage. Only
Willie Mays, with 409 of a possible 432 in
1979, received more votes. Only Ty
Cobb, with a percentage of 98.2 in 1936,
had a higher percentage than Aaron's
97.8 Cobb missed being unanimous by
only four ballots, receiving 222 of the
226 cast in 1936, the first year of the Hall
of Fame vote.
Close behind Aaron and Robinson
were former San Francisco Giants' pit-

TU-.

_

IL

)
J)

Sports Information Photo
WOLVERINE WRESTLER Pat McKay is once again on top of his opponent.
The fifth-year senior earned All-America status last year in the 190-pound
weight class. He and heavyweight Eric Klasson combine to give Michigan a
strong duo in the upper weight divisions.
GMAT
Preparation Seminar

14a1

$

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
FEATURING
THE FLEXIBLES
. -a. -........7 *. tAD

have traveled to all of them, to work witti people in over

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan