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April 16, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Minorities protest 'U'

By BETH ALLEN
In one of yesterday's three major campus rallies,
*more than 100 minority students gathered in Regents
Plaza to protest the conditions they face at the
University, and to suggest ways of changing those
conditions.
"The University is not going to help us, we have to
help ourselves," said LSA junior Dawn Moulton, as
she urged students at the noon rally to unite to sup-
port each other.
ORGANIZED BY the Minority Fightback Conimit-
tee, the protest was intended "to raise our level of
awareness" and to discuss how we can confront the
situation," according to speaker Antonio Carrasco, a
guest lecturer in the political science department.
Carrasco told the protesters they should not forget'

where they came from. The fights in earlier decades
for their rights and the communities looking to them
to make inroads for future students are very impor-
tant, he said.
Other speakers lashed out at University niinority
policy, accusing administrators of breaking promises
made after the 1970 Black Action Movement Strike.
MOULTON SAID University instructors may label
minority students as academically deficient, making
faculty/student relations more strained. "(The
University) is not sensitive to our needs and what we
need to learn," Moulton said.
Members of the Fightback Committee said they
are specifically concerned with the University's
failure to meet recruiting and retention goals; the
lack of minority faculty and graduate assistants; the

The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 16, 1982-Page 5
conditions
budget and programming problems at the William
Monroe Trotter House, a minority activity center;
the lack of minority support services and student in-
put into staff selection; investment in South Africa;
and the escalation of military research on campus
" which could ultimately be used against Third World
nations.
Later in the day, members of the Black Student
Union echoed these concerns to the Regents in the fir-
st day of their April meeting. BSU steering commit-
tee member Paul Fleuranges also cited impending
financial aid cuts as a problem which he said will
deeply hurt minority students.
BSU President Michael Sudarkasa proposed
raising the budget of Trotter House, which he said
now offers programs for all minorities, instead of
only black students.

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Regents hike health fee, approve hospital budget

(Continued from Page )
Health Service Director Caesar
Briefer told the Regents inflation male a
fee- increase necessary, and cited
several improvements, including a
decrease in administrative overhead
and smaller staffing which led to what
he described as a minor hike.
"Management improvements im-
plemented in the current fiscal year
have enabled Health Service, for the
second consecutive year, to request a
budget increase well below medical
care delivery cost increases," Vice
President for Student Services Henry
Johnson said.
PRESENTING to the Regents a

report from the Committee on the
Economic Status of the Faculty
(CESF) reflecting dissatisfaction with
last year's salary programs, economics
Prof. Ronald Teigen said the salary in-
creases were "inadequate."
In a prepared statement, Teigen cited
declining state appropriations to the
University as the central cause of, the
"salary problem.'
"It has become commonplace for a
faculty member here to discover that
comparable faculty elsewhere are
receiving salaries as much as 30 to 50
percent higher," he said.
ACCORDING to Teigen, dissatisfac-
tion with last year's "new strategy"

salary program generated "serious
consequences and implications" for
morale, productivity, teaching effort,
and future quality.
"By 'new strategy' I mean the ap-
parent redefinition, de facto, of merit
as marketability," Teigen said.
University President Harold Shapiro,
however, denied that the salary
program is based on marketability.
Such a program would be "suicide" and
a "disaster," Shapiro said.
IN CLOSING, Teigen suggested
several ways to improve the salary in-
crement program, including directing a
larger share of state appropriations
and private fund sources toward

faculty salaries.
In other business, the Regents ap-
proved a $211 million 1982-83 operating
budget for the University Hospital,
which features several cost contain-
ment programs including a 3 percent
payroll reduction andincreased use of
outpatient surgery.
Under the new budget, hospital ad-
ministrators will begin to use a new
Helicopter Emergency Medical Service
- also approved by the Regents -
which will become the first hospital-
based helicopter service in the state.
Administrators said they expect the
service to be operating by Aug. 1.

I

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'More than 250 pack Regents meeting

(Continued from Page 1)
sober.
Jon Feiger, the former president of
the Michigan Student Assembly, told
the crowd: "They (University ad-
ministrators) rant to turn this univer-
sity into a, massive think-tank for the
government, and especially the
military. We have to let them know we
don't support that."
Another student, Jamie Moeller, who
is a student member of the ad-
ministration's Budget Priorities Com-
mittee, echoed Feiger's concerns..
"This is not a corporation, we're a
university," said Moeller. "The con-
cern cannot be profits-the concern
must be with students and faculty."
AFTER THE rally in Regents' Plaza,
the students marched to the Union's
Anderson Room to protest, the ad-
ministration's policies in retrench-
ment, military research, and minority
affairs.
The protest was organized by a group
of student activists who hoped to im-
press the Regents with the large tur-
nout. They said the fact that so many
students showed up should prove to the
Regents that there is widespread
dissatisfaction with the University ad-
ministration.
Many of the students who spoke to the
Regents came to defend particular
University programs that have been
named for extensive budget reviews.
Psychology Prof. Raphael Ezekiel, a

recently elected Ann Arbor Cit3
cilmember, also had some wo:
the Regents. "Something funn
pened on the way to the form
said. "A year ago, the ge
department was eliminated,
were told that we faced financid
ction.
"That decision was palat
those grounds," he continued,"
survival has become redirec
would ask you elected officialst
back for a moment and look at
happening to the future. I wondi
sort of university I'll be teachir
years from now."
5

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PAUL FLEURANGES of the Black
Student Union said he was particularly
concerned about the nature of the
University's redirection. He cited
reports that 80 percent of minority
students receive financial aid, and
asked the Regents "Where will we be
When the axe comesdown?"
Fleuranges also criticized the
University for holding investments in
corporations that do business in South
Africa. "Eighty-two million dollars is
invested in the racist, apartheid South
Africa. If the University needs more
money, look in the investment portfolio
labeled South Africa," he said.
)py Hour
r of Stroh's $2.75
AfStroh's .50
h Fries .25
on.-Fri. 2pm-5pm
.-Wed. 8pm-Close
H S. University

University of Michigan -
University of Wisconsin
Academic Year in Florence, Italy
Applications for Fall Semester 1982
Winter Semester. 1983
Full Year 1982-1983
Available Now at
The Center for
Western European Studies
5208 Angell Hall

130

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