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April 15, 1982 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-15

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Thursday, April 15, 1982

Page 5

A selection ofcampus film highli
Barbarella

ights

II

Roger Vadim, 1968)
The year was 1968. America was
being torn by a war of dissension at
home, and a war of ineptitude in the
jungles. No one expected that a cute,
rich, and decidedly untalented ac-
tress named Jane Fonda would solve
the problems of a planet far, far
away while wearing only the scan-
tiest of clothes. You've come a long
way, baby. (Thursday, April 15;
Nat. Sci. 7:00).

Straw Dogs
(Sam Peckinpah, 1971)
In a quiet English town, physics
professor Dustin Hoffman and
wife, Susan George, have taken a
sabbatical from the wild American
college life. But all is not as peaceful
as it seems: several of the town-
speople - your basic sociopath-
types - bear a grudge against the
little yankee nerd. (Thursday, April
15; Michigan theatre,. 4:00, 7:00,
9:00).
The Maltese Falcon
(John Huston, 1941)
They've been making movies for 80
Syears,but very, very few of them
can match The Maltese Falcon for
grace, style, economy, and ex-
citement. The inimitable Humphrey
Bogart stars in his best role as Sam
Spade, detective, on the lookout for a
bejeweled statue of a falcon. Peter
Lorre is. the crybaby Joel Cairo;
Sidney Greenstreet is the enormous
fatman Caspar Gutman. But they
are almost all done in by the wiles of
Mary Astor. (Thursday, April 15;
Lorch Hall, 7:00, 10:30).
The Marx Brothers
Three of the funniest Marx Brothers
movies, Duck Soup, The Cocanuts,
" and A Night At The Opera, will be
featured.. Groucho, Chico, Harpo,
.and even Zeppo all try to dupe each
other, various law enforcement of-
ficials, lots of high society types, and
especially the audience in each of
these outrageous, classic comedies.
(Friday, April 16; Lorch Hall -
Duck Soup 7:00; The Cocoanuts
8:30; A Night At The Opera 10:15).
C

Cabaret
(Bob Fosse, 1972)
If you missed the neo-Nazi rally last
month, you can catch the same
flavor of subliminal fear and naive
hatred in this musical drama set in
pre-war Nazi Germany. Liza Minnelli
is the star of a decadent nightclub
show, masterfully emceed by Joel
Grey. Her love affair with Michael
York sets the stage for a song and
dance explanation of the beginnings
of WWII. (Friday, April 16; MLB 4,
7:00,9:15).
Life of Brian
(Terry Jones, 1979)
After the phenomenol success of
Month Python and the Holy Grail,
the Python team waited a while
before hitting the screen again. The
wait was apparently a little too long,
because Life of Brian has none of the
non-sequiter style of plotting and
comedy that distinguished Holy
Grail from a host of imitations. But
even though Brian is a more conven-
tional film, it still has that special
brand of British humor that in in-
comprehensibly funny. (Saturday,
April 17; Lorch Hall, 7:00, 8:40,
10:20).
Gallipoli
(Peter Wier, 1981)
Unfortunately not even nominated
for an Academy Award, this
Australian feature deserves a lot
more attention. Peter Wier
originally set out to film the story of
the Gallipoli landings in Turkey
during WWI, but soon found that the
material was turning into a
documentary. So he stepped back
from that subject and wrote a story
of two friends, who just happen to be
among the soldiers at that ill-fated
landing. Instead of a fact filled docu-
drama, Wier ended up with a
beautiful, vivid story of life and
death. (Saturday, April 17; MLB 4,
7:00,9:30).
Philadelphia Story
(George Cukor, 1940)
A major triumph of the studio
system was the ability to put
together a couple of stars in one
movie. Philadelphia Story boasts the
talents of Katherine Hepburn, Cary
Grant, and Jimmy '-Stewart in a
hilarious. comedy of errors. The
wedding of a divorced socialite sets
the stage for one of the funniest films
of the '40s. (Tuesday, April 20;
Michigan Theatre, 4:00, 7:00, 9:00).
ompiled by Richard Campbell

Richard Moore, director of
'Annile' o
By Richard Campbell.
YOU SAY YOU'VE got $40 million
to spend? Why don't you make a
musical? All you have to do is spend
$9.5 million for the story rights, hire
Albert Finney, Carol Burnett, Tim
Curry, audition thousands of adorable
ten-year-old girls, and hire John Huston
as your director.
At least that's how Ray Stark decided
to make Annie. It is becoming one of the
more talked about pictures of the year;
everyone from Jack Mathews to Shirley
Eder is writing about the production.
But unlike some other high-priced,
heavily publicized pictures, Annie looks
like it's not going to bomb on opening
day.
Tuesday night, Richard Moore, the
director of photography on the picture,
came to Ann Arbor with 30 minutes of
clips from the movie. On the basis of
that eidence, you can rest assured that
Annie is going to break all kinds of
records for a musical.That kind of suc-
cess might mean a resurgence of the
Hollywood musical.
"If this one makes it, it could very
well happen. Hollywood is like a herd of
cattle," Moore said.
Moore has been involved in making
films look good since his graduation
from USC in 1946. At one point he owned
the West coast sales rights for the then
unknown and now standard Ariflex
camera, but was unable to sell many
of them because of a prior business
commitment.
His break in the film industry came
when he helped a friend design a wider
angle lens for an underwater camera,
discovering the qualities of anamorphic
lenses. This marked the beginning of
Panavision, Superscope, and all those
other wide screen lenses.
Before Annie, however, neither
Moore nor Huston had worked on a
musical. Moore said, "I don't know how

Daily Photo by JACKIE BELL
photography on 'Annie.'
ok S good
these things happen. You've got a
situation where some people are being
paid a lot of money for their
jobs ... and it worked."
For the most part Moore enjoys the
anonimity of working on television
commercials, but having worked with
Huston on The Life and Times of Judge
Roy Bean and Myra Breckenridge, he
was persuaded to join the crew of An-
nie. Moore said of Huston: "He's an
economical director. If he sees
something he likes, even if it's the first
take, he'll use it."
"There's not too much chance to be
philosophical about the job. You just try
to get a good days work out of
everybody," Moore added.
It looks like Huston got that "good
day's work" out of his cast and crew.
Instead of another $40 million disaster,
Columbia Pictures might have a winner
on its hands.
769-1300
BARGAIN SNOWS $2.56 Before 6 PM

BtAKif OWARDS'

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Records

Joe Sun - I Ain't Honky
Tonkin' No More'
(Elektra/Asylum)
Most people I know have never heard
of Hoe Sun (results of an informal and
Very cursory poll); but then, most
people I know don't listen to honky tonk
much. They probably consider (as I
id) honky tonk a bit too repetitive or
-sappy or outdated or something to
warrant more than passing attention.
They might be surprised.
On the album cover Mr. Sun appears
to be a well-dressed (tuxedo), well-cut
young man (with a pert little earring
poking out from one lobe); don't let the
picture, or the title, fool you. This isn't
clean music, and it's not cute music -
but this is honty tonk.
If anything, this guy is simply gruff
(that's a good word; say it a few times
in a low voice, emphasizing the "f's",
and you may get something of an idea
ofh how Sun sings).' On the very first
song he establishes the bittersweet, en-
dearing loner image which pervades
the entire LP: "Well I've been known to
lie from time to time/ Then go drink
ANN ARBOR
2 INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ave of liberty 7019700
f WEOsAT.SUN
'only $1.50
snws before
6th and FINAL WEEK!
1ALL NEW
RICHARD
PRYOR
LIE ON THE
SUNSET STRIP
DAILY-6:55, 8:35, 10:15 (R)

myself right out of my mind/ There's a
rumor goin' round that I like to rip and
roar/ but I ain't honky tonkin' no
more."
Sun keeps his songs pretty slow, his
voice pretty low, and his topics limited
to the expected - the rambling life, dif-
ficult love affairs, drinking, and music.
Most of the time he's content to hide
behind covers (ranging from fairly
good to eminently forgettable). I don't
know why he stuck in yet another ver-
sion of "Will the Circle be Unbroken."
That one's getting quite tired by now.
Joe Sun doesn't make any terrifically
new moves on this album, and he's not
an especially "fun" or upbeat singer
(try Joe Ely, though, if you're looking
for some excellent, fast-moving coun-
try), but he does make things in-
teresting and enjoyable enough to
maybe change a lot of people's minds
about honky tonk. With a little en-
couragement, perhaps, he'll break the
title promise and change some more.
-Ben Ticho

i

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The Story of an Innocent Woman
AGAINST KATIE BLOOM
a new play by SCOTT T. CUMMINGS
April 14-18 8 pem.
TICKETS $2

R. C. AUDITORIUM

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TICKETS 5.00

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A WICKEDLY FUNNY

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