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April 13, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-13

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Page 2-Tuesday April 13, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Battle brews over auto emissions bill

IN BRIEF

(Continued from Page 1)
costly, while the 1980 level was an appr-
opriate balance between environmental
and economic considerations.
BUT, SOME environmentalists doubt
that the auto industry really cares
about the environment and is solely
concerned with cuttings costs. "The
justifications the industry has used for
most of their stances (in favor of the
bill) have seen economic justifications
- none of them hold any water (for en-
vironmental concerns) and they know
it," said Jim McCarger, coordinator of
the Ecology Center of Ann Arbor's
Clean Air Committee.
McCarger and Jeff Alson, of the EPA,
say they don't buy the industrys,
argument that air quality is already
improving and that tighter standards
are not necessary.
THE AUTO industry, and par-
ticularly General Motors, have claimed
that almost every region of the country
has air quality that meets or surpasses
standards set by the National Ambient
Air Quality Act. Therefore, industry
leaders say, such strict emissions stan-
dards are needless.
If the government rolled back its
emissions requiements to 1980 levels,
said Werner of GM, "it should continue
to improve air quality as new cars
(with better pollution controls) replace
old cars," on the road.
But the EPA's Alson said that

although newer cards do create less
pollution, there are so many more cars
on the road now than there were 10 or 15
years ago that pollution continues to
worsen. "The growth (in the number of
cars and new industrial plants) will just
start to overcome that (progress
already made) and they (pollution
levels) will go up again."
BESIDES, POINTS out McCarger, if
the emissions standards are eased "as
many as 20 or 30" regions of the United
States would become so polluted that
they would no longer meet the air
quality goals defined by the National
Ambient Air Quality Act.
Health problems resulting from auto
exhaust crop up most often in urban
centers,- McCarger said. "It's
primarily a respiratory problem. It
can nail people with emphysema, bron-
chial problems, andasthma."
McCarger also challenged Werner's
contention that atuo emissions con-
tribute very little to the pollution that
causes acid rain. Werner said that they
primary contributer to acid rain is
sulfur dioxide and that nitrogen dioxide
(produced in car exhaust) is only a
secondary contributor. Further, Wer-
ner said, cars produce only 4.5 percent
of the material that causes acid rain.
BUT MCCARGER claimed Werner
was dead wrong. 'This is again one
issue that the industry tends to twist
around," he said of Werner's statistics.
McCarger claimed that Werner did not
take into account the fact that nitrogen
dioxide has a more profund effect on
acid rain because it has a build-up ef-
fect throughout the winter.
The pollutants from car exhaust are
stored up during the winter in snowfall.
During spring, as the snow melts, all
the nitrogen dioxide built up through
the winter is released at once. This sud-
den release has a more significant ef-
fect than the sulfur dioxide, which is
released steadily throughout the year.
Besides relaxing the emissions stan-
dards on their new cars, GM would also
like to change the way these emissions

Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
EARL WERNER, MANAGER of federal activities for General Motors, ex-
plains his arguments in support of a House bill to ease federal auto emissions

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
PLO 'expects' Israeli attack
BEIRUT, Lebanon- The Palestine Liberation Organization said yester-
day that it was expecting an Israeli attack on Lebanon "at any moment"
despite reports from Israel that no decision to act had been made.
In Washington, the White House announced that President -Reagan was
sending Undersecretary of State Walter Stoessel to the Middle East to head
off fighting between Israel and Palestinians. Deputy press secretary Larry
Speakes said "the situation still remains tense"-
He said the trip would begin in mid-week but added that it was uncertain
which countries Stoessel would visit.
Palestinian guerrillas in southern Lebanon, the PLO's main power base,
were on full alert as the clock ticked past the deadline that PLO chief Yasser
Arafat predicted would bring an Israeli strike.
Financier to serve remainder
of Abscam senator's terms
TRENTON, N.J.- Republican financier Nicholas Brady was appointed to
the U.S. Senate yesterday to serve the seven months remaining in the term
of Democrat Harrison Williams, who resigned because of Abscam.
After the announcement by Gov. Thomas Kean, Brady, 52, immediately
ruled out any possibility.he would be a candidate in the November election
for a full six-year term.
Brady, an adviser and contributor to Kean's campaign last year, will by
the 54th Republican in the Senate. This extra GOP vote could be crucial on.
many issues, including President Reagan's controversial fiscal 1983 budget.
Kean's appointment does not need confirmation by any other body.
Walesa reunited with family
OTWOCK WIELKI, Poland- Solidarity leader Lech Walesa was secluded
yesterday under military guard in an 18th-century palace south of Warsaw
where he was reunited with his family on Easter for the first time since his
arrest four months ago.
Walesa had seen his wife twice since he was interned when martial law
was imposed last Dec. 13 but saw his new daughter Victoria for the first time
only late last month.
In Rarczew, a nearby village, the parish vicar confirmed Walesa was in
the palace.
Soviet father granted visa
to battle for son in U.S.
CHICAGO- The father of Walter Polovehak, a Soviet boy fighting to
remain in the United States, has been given permission to return to this
country to join the legal battle over his son, the State Department said
yesterday.
Department spokeswoman Elee Roeder said in Washington that Michael
Polovchak, father of the 14-year-old boy, has been granted a visa. She had no
immediate information on terms of the visa.
Walter's lawyer, Julian Kulas, has asked for the father's return to obtain
depositions from him in the custody battle. A tentative hearing date has been
set for April 15.
U.S. retail sales decline
WASHINGTON- U.S. retail sales declined 0.5 percent in March, cutting
short a sales recovery that now appears to have lasted only one month, the
Commerce Department reported yesterday.
Rebounding from a January plagued by bad weather, retailers had rolled
up a 2.6 percent gain in sales during February after suffering substantial
declines in the two previous months.
If anything, first-quarter sales were better than might haveibeer expected
with the economy in the throes of a recession, according to private analst
Sandra Shaber.
Consumer spending has stayed as high as it has-helping keep the
economy from sliding even lower--only because Americans have been put-
ting less money into savings, she said. And that trend is unlikely to continue
much longer, she added.
0he 3idjtgun 39atIl
Vol. XCII, No. 153
Tuesday, April 13. 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters) ,$13by mail out-
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Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International
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- News room (313) 764-0552. 76.DAILY. Sports desk. 764-0562: Circulation 7640558; Classified Advertising.
764.0557: Display advertising. 764.0554: Billing. 7640550.

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an average emission standard.
"Each car has an inherent emission
level, but they're all within a range-
the thing that's important is the whole
fleet," Werner said. If the fleet, or
"bubble" concept was put into effect,
"it gives me a whole lot more
flexibility, and it would also reduce the
cost and reduce the regulatory risk of
non-compliance," he added.
According to McCarger, the actual
effect of this would be to increase the
emissions beyond the specified level.
This, he claims, is the real reason the
industry wants the change.
"IT ALLOWS the industry to shift the'
curve up so that the average vehicle is
meeting the standard rather than every
vehicle-your total emissions are
significantly higher," he said.
"I can't imagine anybody questioning
that reasoning," concurred Alson of
Ann Arbor's EPA unit. Alson said that
currently auto companies have
emissions that are below the average as
a safety margin, but if the "bubble"
concept for measurement was in-
stituted, "I don't think 'there's any
question that there would be increasing
emissions.
The key to measuring these
emissions is not in the factory, though,
Alson said, but once the car has been on
the road.

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