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April 08, 1982 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I-

'U' student testifies on federal aid

By FANNIE WEINSTEIN
A University student testified on the
effects of proposed cuts to aid to higher
education before a congressional sub-
committee in Washington last week.
Rackham Student Government
Director Carla Dearing spoke to the
House Appropriations Subcommittee
on Labor, Health, Human Services, and
Education March 30. She voiced her
opposition to cuts in the Guaranteed
Student Loan Program and in the Pell
and State Student Incentive grant
allocations.
ACCORDING to Dearing many
legislators weren't aware of oppostion
to the cutbacks. "They said . . . that
students weren't speaking up and they,
didn't know everyone was so riled up,"
she said.
Dearing, originally from Battle

Creek, said Rep. Carl Pursell (R-Ann
Arbor and a member of the subcommit-
tee) had been seeking a; Michigan
resident to testify who depended on
financial aid and aware of the situation.
In addition to presenting the sub-
committee with written and verbal
testimony about her personal financial
situation, she also read a series of
quotes from other University students.
The quotes were obtained by the
University Student Aid Task Force.
While in Washington, Dearing said
she also met with Rep. Jim Dunn (R-
Lansing) and Rep. Howard Wolpe
(D-Kalamazoo).
Several legislators are currently con-
centrating on getting full congressional
approval on the supplemental bill
passed by the House Appropriatons
Committee last month. The suplemen-
tal bill calls for an additional $1.3 billion

In funds for the GSL program, accor-
ding to Dearing.;
IF THAT BILL is passed without any
changes, graduate students will main-
tain their eligibility in the program for
the 1982-83 academic year.
"Everybody was very positive and
everybody was geared up to get the
Senate to pass it," Dearing said.
Thomas Butts, assistant to the
Univeristy's vice president for
academic affairs, also attended the
hearing. He said he felt Dearing's
testimony was effective.
"SHE HAD HER facts together and
was able to relate a personal situation
to publicpolicy," he said.
"The members who were there were
impressed. The room was full. It was
standing room only," he added.
Accoding to Butts, Congress will con-
tinue to debate the supplemental bill
once it returns from recess and will
probably not act on it before early May.
BUTTS SAID there is a strong
possibility that the bill may be passed
with a number of amendments.
Congress has up to seven or eight op-
tions, Butts noted, ranging from the ex-
cluding graduate students to main-
taining current guidelines.
"There's very little support for ex-
cluding graduate students from the
GSL Program," he said. "The mem-
bers (of Congress) have come torealize
the importance of graduate eduation .

The argument is that graduate
education is essential."
Butts said there have been other en-
couraging developments in Washington
for graduate students, including a bill
recently introduced in the House,
which recommends that all administr-
ation proposals be approved - except
for the elimination of graduate students
from the program.
," I LIKE TO remain optimistic that
the GSL Program will not be changed in
fiscal 1982," Butts said. "This coming
school year would begin the way it did
this year. We would know the ground
rules."
There will also be a major debate
over proposed cutbacks in the 1983
budget, Butts said. "There clearly will
be some attempt to put some constrain-
ts on the GSL program," he said.
In the meantime, according to
Dearing, the fight against cutbacks in
aid will continue. "Bandaid the 'M'
Day" was postponed because of the
weather, she said, but an
organizational meeting will take place
on April 12 at 8 p.m., in the Michigan
Student Assembly office in the
Michigan Union.
In addition, Dearing added, she and
other members of the Student Aid Task
Force will be taping a panel discussin
on financial aid for KV31, a Toledo
television station. An air date for the
show has not yet been set.

The Michigan Daily--Friday, April 9, 1982-Page 3
HOUSING DIVISION
FOR 1982-83 ACADEMIC YEAR
Resident Advisor and Graduate Student
Teaching Positions Available
.in.tbe
PILOT PROGRAM/ALIlCE LLOYD HALL
Individuals must come to 1500 S.A.B. to update application
presently on file.
New applicants may pick up an application in the Housing
Off ice, 1500 S.A.B. from 8:00 A.M.-12:00 noon and from 12:30
P.M.-4:30 P.M., Wednesday, April 7 through Wednesday,
April 14, 1982.
For more Information, call Dr. David Schoem, Pilot Di-
rector, 100 Observatory Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
(313) 764-7521.
Application Deadline: 4 p.m., Wed., April 14, 1982
A NON-DISCRIMINATORY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER

-APENING-
HIGHLIGHT
The Michigan Citizens' Lobby will sponsor a benefit to promote a petition
against automatic rate increases tonight at 8 p.m. in the Michigan Union
Ballroom. The Cult Heroes, the Characters, and Bob will perform. Ad-
mission is $2, and there is a cash bar.
FILMS
Mediatrics - American Werewolf in London, 7 &:9 p.m., MLB 3.
Public Health a- Half Million Teenagers; VD: Handle With Care; & When
Love Needs Care, 12:05 p.m., Aud., SPH II.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - Kramer Vs. Kramer, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Alternative Action - Hearts of the West, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Cinema Guide - Strangers on a Train, 7 p.m., The Bride Wore Black, 9
p.m., Lorch Hall.
Cinema II - Hair, 7 & 9 p.m., Aud. A., Angell.
Classic Film Theater - Bedazzled, 5 & 9:15 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Classic Film Theater -110, 7 & 11:30 p.m., Michigan Theater.
PERFORMANCES
Ark - Spider John Koerner, 9p.m., 1421 Hill St.
Eclipse Jazz - Concert, Ronald Shannon Jackson and the Decoding
Society, 9 p.m., University Club, Michigan Union.
School of Music - Symphony Band, & Wind Ensemble, H. Robert
Reynolds, conductor, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.; Voice Recital, Mark Winkler,
baritone, $8p.m., Recital Hall.
Creative Ensemble- "The Wine and the Wilderness," 8 p.m., Canterbury
Loft, 332S. State.
Brass Ring - The Jeff Lorber Fusion, 7:30 p.m., Royal Oak Music
Theater.
SPEAKERS
Natural Resources - Laird Norton Distinguished Visitor Series Lecture,
John McMahon, "Japanese Trade," 3-5 p.m., 1040 Dana.
Guild House - Noon luncheon, Myra Fabian, "Women in Higher3
Education: Issues[& Options for the 80's," 802 Monroe.
Psychobiology Program - Lecture, Martin Daly, "The Sooi biology of
Homicide," 4 p.m., W. Conference Room, Rackham.
Human Growth and Development - An afternoon with seven visiting
scholars, "Child Developmnt in China," 1:30 - 4 p.m.; 7th floor, 300 N.
Ingalls,
South & Southwest Asian Studies - Lecture, Steve Markel, "A Pilgrimage
to the Ganges at Benares," (with slides), noon, Commons Room, Lane Hall.
Medieval & Renaissance Collegium - Lecture, Dolores Urquidi, "The
Two-Headed Dragon in Medieval Iconography," (with slides), 5 p.m., 4th
floor, Commons, MLB.
MEETINGS
Int'l. Student Fellowship Meeting open to all foreign students, 7 p.m.,
4100 Nixon Road.%
University Lowbrow Astronomers, open to anyone interested in amateur
astronomy, 7:30 p.m., 5006 Angell Hall.
MISCELLANEOUS
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class - For questions or rides, call 996-4297 or
769-1868, 7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
University Duplicate Bridge Club - Open Game. Inexperienced players
welcme, 7:30 p.m., League.
Folk Dance Club - Folk Dance Instruction, 8 - 9:30 p.m.; Request Dan-
cing, 9:30 - midnight, Union.
Recreational Sports - International recreation Program, 7 - 9 p.m.,
NCRB.
CEW - Information Clinic, "Financial Aid Information," 12 - 1:30 p.m.,
2nd floor of the Huron Valley Natl. Bank Bldg.
Hillel - Shabbat Services, 6:50p.m., Orthodox; 7p.m., Conservative.
Guild House Poetry Series - Bert Schierbeek and Kees Snoek, 3:30 p.m.,
802 Monroe.
Art Sclool - "Metals III, an Invitational Undergraduate Show." 7:30 -
9:30 p.m., Art and Architecture Building in corridor adjacent to Slusser
Gallery.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan-Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

tdo well in

16m-year-old jailed
in Yale, mass murder

From AP and UPI
PORT HURON- Investigators kept
an unidentified 16-year-old boy jailed as
a suspect yesterday as they sought a
motive for the slaying of a woman and
her four adopted children.
The youth was arrested Wednesday,
about 10 hours after Betty Giuliani and
the children were found dead in their
rural home near Yale, about 55 miles
north of Detroit. All had been shot in the
head with a .22-caliber rifle, authorities
said.
ST. CLAIR County Prosec.utor Robert
Cleland said yesterday he would
\petition the county probate court today
to allow him to hold the youth, whom
authorities refused to identify.
If a judge agreed, Cleland said he
could hold the juvenile for up to two
weeks before filing charges or asking
the youth be waived to circuit court for
trial as an adult.
"The hearing will simply determine
whether the juvenile will be continued
in custody and I expect that a decision
will bemade within armatter of days
about the filing of formal charges,"
Cleland said.
AUTHORITIES said they had no
motive for the slaying. Cleland
described the boy, held in the St. Clair
County Jail, as a "friend of the family."
No others were being sought,
although investigators were analyzing
a "tremendous" amount of information
"and a substantial number of witnesses
and potential witnesses (were) to be in-
terviewed," the prosecutor said.
The victims were Betty Giuliani, 51,
and her four children Erick, 19;
Kathleen, 16; Cindy Joe, 13; and Dino,
9. Mrs. Giuliani's husband, Richard, 48,
was 60 miles away it work when their
bodies were found.
THE REV. Joseph Nosal, pastor of
Sacred Heart parish where the Giuliani
RIDE, HORSES
Hayrides and
Party Hall
Douglas Meadows
Ranch
Temperance, Mi.
313-856-3973

family worshipped, said he understood
that the 16-year-old boy and the elder
Giuliani son had been friends but had a
recent falling-out.
The suspect attended high school with
one of the victims and lives within a
mile of the home where the bodies were
found, police said.
Cleland said the youth was arrested
after authorities broadcast a police
alert "for a particular auto" which was
stopped about 6 p.m. Wednesday in
downtown Yale, some four miles from
the Giuliani house.
A neighbor who had planned to go
bowling Wednesday with Mrs. Giuliani
found the bodies shortly before 8 a.m.,
authorities- said. There was no in-
dication of forced entry or robbery, of-
ficials said.

Economy Clas4
Simple. Fly Capitol Air's Economy Class. Our
fares are the lowest of any scheduled airline so
you can use the money you save for lots of
other things. Like a Eurail-pass if you fly us to
Brussels, Frankfurt or Zurich. More time in the
sun if you're headed for Miami, $an Juan or
Puerto Plata. Or for even more fun in New York,
Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago or Boston.
And, if you are flying to Europe this summer,
make your reservation and buy your ticket
now. With our guaranteed fare policy you are
protected against any fare increases from now
until departure.
So if you want to do well in Economy Class,
fly Capitol's.
For reservations, call your Travel Agent or
Capitol at 312-347-0230 in Chicago, 800-572-
5788 in Illinois or 800-621-5330 outside Illinois.
No one makes Economy Class
as -economical as we do.
SCHEDULED AIRLINE SERVICE
THE LOWEST FARES

ss

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4th Smash .Week!
The trap is set...
For a wickedly funny
who'll-do-it.
DEATH
TRAP
MICHAEL CAINE
CHRISTOPHER REEVE
DYAN CANNON
FRI, MON-7:15, 9:25 (PG)
SAT, SUN-12:45, 2:55,' 5:05,
7:15,9:25

ac
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COUPON MUST A CCOMPANY PURCHASE j COUPON MUST A CCOMPANY PURCHASE f
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DINNER DINNER
I Served with " Baked Potato j Served with " Baked Potato
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.GOOD FOR ANY PARTY SIZE 1GOOD FOR ANY PARTY SIZE
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.
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MICHIGAN CITIZENS LOBBY

UTI L

I

TY

BASH

A Benefit
Automatic

To Help

Stop

Concert
Utility

Rate Increases

a
"
I
U
I

THE

CULT

HEROES

ANN ARBOR LATE SHOWS
FRI and SAT NIGHT
ALL SEATS $2.00

BOB

At MIDNIGHT (R)
"GANGS AT WAR".

- m - U

I

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