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April 07, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-07

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Page 2-Wednesday, April 7, 1982-The Michigan Daily

CRISP: A trend-setter in the Big Ten

(Continued from Page 1)
fieldhouse system now and we're not
proud of it. But some students like it.
because it is a social event."
"IT'S NOT our first attempt at
redesigning our registration," Cote
said. In 1974, Indiana tried to set up a
terminal-based system like the Univer-
sity's that "did everything for the
student." But they were never able to
work out the various problems with the
computer programs.
In developing their new system, Cote
said Indiana "wanted to eliminate
human error as much as possible." He
said he also felt that with a terminal-
based system there is too much interac-
tion between the terminal operator and
the student.
"The terminal operator is not a coun-
selor" and shouldn't have the chance to
be one, Cote said.
PURDUE presently uses an on-line
computer system, according to Camilla
Lawson, Purdue University's assistant
registrar for registration.
And unlike the University's system,
Purdue does not have one central
location for all of their computer ter-
minals. Instead, students send or bring
their information to an office at the
school or, in some cases, the depar-
tment they are enrolled in, Lawson
Laid.
She added that Purdue has been using
this system, with terminals in about 10
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Daily Photo by BRIAN 4MASC
JUNIOR ENGINEERING student Thomas Ward didn't have any problems at CRISP this term. Ward was one of the fir-
st students to register for classes, taking advantage of his early Monday afternoon appointment time. Programmer,

Tom Arner is entering Ward's requests
locations around campus, for only one
term.
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another of the many schools around the
nation phasing in a system very similar
to the University's, according to Bruce
Kendall, the Director of Twin Cities
registration for Minnesota. The school
presently uses the gymnasium method.
At Northwestern students use 'an old,
old IBM card system," Northwestern
University Registrar Donald Gwinn
said. And like many other universities
around the Big Ten and the rest of the
country, Northwestern is also thinking
of going to an on-line computer system.
"The biggest problem with our curent
system is that the car handling equip-
ment is very old and unreliable,"
Gwinn said.
GWINN SAID he liked the on-line
system the best because "the student is
there to resolve problems." He added
that Northwestern will probably im-
plement a new system in the fall of 1983
or the winter of 1984.
The other Big Ten schools either use a
gymnasium registration system
similar to the University's old system,
or a batch system. the batch system,
students send in their course request
forms to the registration office, which
processes a set of the requests at the
end of the day at one time, rather than
processing them continuously as an on-
line system does.
According to University of Wiscon-
sin's Associate Registrar Thomas
Johnson, Wisconsin is considering im-
plementing a registration system
similar to the Univerisity's. Wisconsin
now uses a "modified gymnasium"
form of registration, Johnson said.
JOHNSON said he did see some
drawbacks to using an "on-line"
registration system like the Univer-
sity's. "With a computer we would
have to hold registration for more than
the five days we currently use," he
said, "and' we would also have to
publish the time schedule sooner.''
Now, Wisconsin's time schedule comes
out four days before registration
begins.
Michigan State students use pencil-
actuated computer scan forms to make
course requests, according to Assistant
Registrar Virginia Angell. She said

students register alphabetically with
some emphasis given to class level and
school.
sMSU also has looked at a computer
system but that process is going very
slowly. And as with Wisconsin, MSU
students work more closely with in-
dividual departments during
registration than do University studen-
ts.
STUDENTS WHO register early at
the University of Illinois select classes
by section, as the University does, ac-
cording to Brian Wallen, the Assistant
director of admissions and records.
After students turn in their requests,
a batch is run and the computer checks
to see if those requests can be accom-
modated. If they can't however, the
computer wil automatically look for
another open section that fits the
student's schedule and enroll in in that
section.
Wallen said a copy of the schedule
then is mailed to the student along with
the tuition bill. Students can either
elect that schedule or change it by mail
or coming to the proper office to make
the change in person.
FOR STUDENTS who do not register
in advance there is also a two day gym-
nasium registration before classes each
term.
But Waller said although Illinois uses
computers to find open sections,
Illinois' registration system stil uses,
scan cards. He admitted they have
problems with students who do not
properly fill out the cards.
"That's one problem avoided at (the
University)," Wallen said. "The
student is right at the terminal to
correct those mistakes. We can't do
that."
HE ALSO pointed out that their "bat-
ch" system does not "mirror reality"
because course information is not con-
tinuely updated as in the University's
on-line system.
But Illinois does not plan to change
their registration process. "We looked
at (the University's) and Iowa's
system, but we're nervous about going
on-line," Wallen said. "Our computer
is in Chicago (about a four hour drive
from Champaign), not on campus.',

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
GM pact may pass-barely
DETROIT- The concessionary pact between the United Auto Workers
and General Motors Corp. appeared on the path to approval yesterday with
several key locals-including some loaded with dissidents-yet to vote on the
contract.
UAW officials are not releasing exact vote counts until all ballots have
been tabulated at the end of the week but informal tallies showed at least 35
locals had approved the contract while at least 12 have rejected it.
One count placed the margin of approval at about 65 percent-somewhat
less than the 76 percent approval a similar contract with Ford Motor Co.
received.
A local president whose members were voting on the pact Tuesday predic-
ted it would be rejected.
Anthony Fernandez, president of the UAW Local 595 representing workers
in Linden, N.J., claimed each employee would lose about $10,000 during the
course of the agreement, which calls for wage and benefit freezes.
Labor cheers Reagan critics
WASHINGTON- Construction union leaders cheered and whistled
yesterday as Democratic presidential hopefuls Edward Kennedy and Walter
Mondale attacked President Reagan's failure to cut high interest rates that
have paralyzed home building.
The thunderous reception by nearly 4,000 delegates to a legislative con-
ference of the AFL-CIO Building and Construction Trades Department was
in sharp contrast to the cold welcome, including some boos, accorded
Reagan by the same group Monday.
Enthusiastic applause often interrupted the anti-Reagan speeches by for-
mer Vice President Mondale and Senator Kennedy (D-Mass.), both potential
candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination, in comparison to
weak and infrequent applause during Reagan's speech.
A liberal Republican, Sen. Lowell Weicker of Connecticut, followed Kennedy
and Mondale, and stunned the audience with a blistering attack against
Reagan's policies.
Nicaraguan-Honduran feud
over 'kidnapping' heats up
MANAGUA, Nicaragua- The recall of Nicaragua's ambassador from
neighboring Honduras over the alleged "kidnapping" of six Nicaraguan
peasants by Honduran border guards could last indefinitely, Foreign
Ministry sources said yesterday.
Nicaragua's leftist Sandinista government filed a strong protest over the
kidnapping, calling it "another act of aggression by the Honduran army of
incalculable consequences. These provocations are premeditated plans to
take the countries to an armed confrontation with dire consequences for our
peoples."
The Sandinistas denied their forces had first captured six Honduran
citizens, as Honduras had charged, to justify its "reprisal" raid into
Nicaragua.
Nicaragua's ambassador in Tegucigalpa, Guillermo Suarez Rivas, was
recalled to Managua urgently Monday.
Avalanche survivor
may still lose feet
SQUAW VALLEY, Calif.- Anna Conrad, who miraculously survived five
days buried in an avalanche at a Sierra Nevada ski resort, has been told her
feet might be amputated because of frostbite, her doctor said yesterday.
Dr. Roger Mason made the announcement as searchers hoping to find only
empty cars and debris prepared to clear the last snow from the parking lot at
Alpine Meadows ski resort where an avalanche last Wednesday killed seven
persons.
Miss Conrad was found Monday under a row of lockers that had fallen
across a bench in an A-frame building at the bottom. of the ski mountain at
the popular Sierra Nevada resort. She had been missing for 115 hours.
Mason told a news conference at Tahoe Forest Hospital that surgery per-
formed Monday night to clear blood clots may not solve circulation problems
in the feet of the 22-year-old ski lift operator.

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Vol. XCII, No. 148
Wednesday, April 7, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109..Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street. Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109
The Michigan Doily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate
News room (313) 764-0552. 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 764-0562: Circulation, 764-0558: Classified Advertising.
764-0557: Display advertising, 764-0554: Billing, 764-0550.

! I

VOTE in the
MICHIGAN STUDENT
ASSEMBLY ELECTIONS
Aprn 6th & 7th

Thatcher refuses to resign
despite vocal opposition
t Anfn t ..rn .. u 1-,

POLLING HOURS
Tuesday, April 6th
12 DAY SITES
ART & ARCHITECTURE .................................
FISHBOWL ........................................
MEDICAL SCHOOL ...............................
NURSING SCHOOL ... . ............ . ...... . .........
LAW SCHOOL (Hutchins Hall) ................ . ......... .
BUSINESS SCHOOL ......................... . ....... .
DENTAL SCHOOL ... ....... .....
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION ...............................
ENGINEERING ARCH ........ ..................... .
WASHTENAW BUS STOP ...........................
UNION STEPS .......................................
10 NIGHT SITES
BURSLEY ......................................
COUZENS ........................................
ALICE LLOYD........................................
MARKLEY......................................
EAST QUAD...............................
MOSHER-JORDAN ...... . ................. .............
STOCKWELL .....................................
SOUTH QUAD ........................................
W EST QUAD .................................. ........
UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY .......................... .
Wednesday, April 7th
11 DAY SITESI
MUSIC SCHOOL..................................
FISHBOW L .......................... .................
MEDICAL SCHOOL .................................
LAW SCHOOL (Hutchins)...........................
PUBLIC HEALTH ..................................
BUSINESS SCHOOL ......... ........... .... ........
CRISP .... . . ..
CRIP.I .R..... ..................... ..............
NERIG ARC..............................
NATURAL RESOURCES .............................

Open-Close
8:40-2:40
8:45-3:30
9:00-3:00
9:00-3:00
9:00-3:00
9:15-3:15
9: 15-4: 15
9:20-3:15
9:30-3:25
9:40-5:45
9:55-6:30
10:05-5:05
4:45-6:30
4:45-6:45
4:45-6:45
5:00-7:00
5:00-7:00
5:15-7:15
5:20-7:20
5:30-7:30
5:30-7:30
7:00-11:00
Open-Close
8:30-2:30
8:45-3:30
9:00-3:00
9:00-3:00
9: 15-3: 15
9:15-3:15
9:15-4:20
9:30-5:30
9:30-5: 10
9:45-5:4

(continued from Pae 1)il
midnight yesterday and her gover-
nment asked the European Common
Market to impose economic sanctions
against Argentina.
She said U.N. sanctions "would be
rather difficult to obtain."
LONDON'S stock market plunged for
the second straight day in reaction to
the government crisis. Some $3.36
billion was wiped off share prices in
only a few hours of trading and the
pound dropped from $1.7605.

As Thatcher tried to ride out the
parliamentary storm, the assault ship
HMS Fearless set out from Portsmouth
to join the largest war fleet assembled
by Britain since the 1956 Suez crisis.
On Monday, Britain advised its 17,000
citizens in Argentina to leave the coun-
try if they had no urgent business there.
The Fearless will link up with a 40
ship armada - nearly two thirds of the
Royal Navy - and sail 8,000 miles for a
possible showdown with the Argentine
navy over the isolated island chain 450
miles east of Argentina in the South
Atlantic.

Editor-in-Chief .. DAVID MEYER
Managing Editor PAMELA KRAMER
Executive Editor........ CHARLES THOMSON
Student Affairs Editor. ...ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor....MARK GINDiN
Opinion Poge Editors ..... ANDREW CHAPMAN
JULIE HINDS
Arts Editors..-....------- RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
Sports Editor IsOB WOJNOWSKI
Assoc tote Sports Editors BARB BARKER
MARTHA CRAML
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACt.
Photography Editor...............BRIAN MASCK
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill. Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Jeff Schrier.
ASSISTANT PHOTOGRAPHERS: Linda Kelley, Doug
McMahon, Avi Pelosoff. Elizabeth Scott. Jon Snow,
Diane Williams.
ARTISTS: Norm Christiansen. Robertlence Jonathon
Stewart, Richard Wolk
LIBRARIANS: Bonnie Hawkins, Gory Schmitz.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, George Adams. Jason
Adkins, Beth Allen, Perry Clark, Poe Coughlon, Liso
Crumrine. Pam Fickinger, Lou Fintor, Rob Frank, Steve
Hook, Kothlyn Hoover, Harlan Kohn, Nancy Molich,
Jenny Miller, Amy Moon, Anne Mytych, Dan
Oberrotman, Stacy Powell, Janet Roe, Chris Soloto,
Jim Schreitmueller, Susan Sharon. David Spak, Jim
Sparks. Lisa Spector, Bill Spindle, Kristin Stapleton.
Scott Stuckol, Fannie Weinstein. Barry Witt.
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Don Aronoff. Linda Bolkin,
Kent Redding, Nathaniel Warshoy.8

ARTS STAFF: Tonio Blanich, Jane Carl, James Clinton,
Mark Dighton, Elliott Jackson, Adom Knee, Walt
Owen, Carol Ponemon, Ben Ticho.
SPORTS STAFF: Jesse Barkin. Tom Bentley. Jeff
Bergida. Randy Berger. Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle
Laura Clark. Richard Demok. Jim Dworman. Louri
Fainblott. Mark Fischer. David Formon. Chris Gerbosi
Paul selgren. Mat Henehon, Chuck Joffe, Steve
Kamen. Josh Kaplan. Robin Kopilnick. Doug Levy,
Mike McGraw, Lorry Mishki- non Newman. Andrew
Oakes. Jeff Quicksilver. Sarah Sherber. George
Tonasijevich. James Thompson. Karl Wheatley Chris
Wilson. Chuck Whittmon
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager .................JOSEPH BRODA
Sales Manager ................ KATHRYN HENDRICK
Operations Manager ............ SUSAN RABUSHKA
Display Manager ................... ANN SACHAR
Classified Manoager...........MICHAEL SELTZER
Finance Manager ................. SAM SLAUGHTER
Assistant Display Manager ........,PAMELA GOULD
Nationals Manager ................ LINDSAY BRAY
Circulation Manager.................KIMWOODS
Sales Coordinator ........... E. ANDREW PETERSON
SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Wendy Fox, Mark Freeman,
Nancy Joslin, Beth Kovinsky, Caryn Notiss, Felice
Oper, Tim Pryor, Joe Trulik, Jeff Voight.
BUSINESS STAFF: Ruth Bard, Hope Barron, Fran Bell,
Molly Benson, Beth Bowman, Denise Burke, Becki
Chottiner, Marcia Eisen, Louro Forrell, Sandy Fricka,
Meg Gibson, Pom Gillery, Morci Gittleman, Jamie
Goldsmith, Mark Horito, Laurie Iczkovitz, Karen John-
son, Ado Kusnetz. Gito Pillai, Chantelle Porter, Don
Quandt, Pete Rowley, Leah Stanley. Tracy Summerwill

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