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April 03, 1982 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-03

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Page 2-Sunday, April 4, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Computer registration an ongoing process

(Continued from Page 1)
"IN SEVEN YEARS we have had two
major breakdowns," Karunas said. In
December, 1979, registratin had to be
postponed one full day when a disc
drive failed. And last spring digging at
the new Law Library caused the
telephone lines used for the computer to
stretch, forcing a shutdown for about a
half day.
"But our biggest variable is the
student. We can never predict the
behavior of the student," Karunas said.
"We have a big problem getting
(them) here on time."
He said CRISP can handle 640 studen-
ts an hour but only half show up durin
g the 8 to 9 a.rm. hour. He also said it is
"impossible" to schedule a senior at 10

a.m. on a Monday or V4ednesday.
"CRISP ITSELF seldom fails,''
Karunas said. "The underlying
problem (with the system) is just
miscommunication."
The system has become "a model for
many other schools," including the
University of Iowa, Purdue University,
Ball State, and others, according to
Associate Registrar for Personnel and
Operations Douglas Woolley. Other
schools, including the Universityof
Minnesota, Northwestern, and
Michigan State University have looked
at CRISP.
Minnesota is in the process of conver-
ting to a similar "one-line" system, ac-
cording to Bruce Kendall, the director
of Twin Cities registration at the

University of Minnesota.
NORTHWESTERN will "probably"
implement a new system in the fall of
1983 or the winter of 1984, according to
that university's registrar, Donald
Gwinn.
While most University students use
the CRISP system to register, the
Medical School, the Art School, the Law
School, and a few other schools in the
University use different procedures.
Because the program for each
student in the Medical School is
predetermined for the first four years,
registration for Medical School studen-
ts is done manually, according to
Shirley Martin, the Medical School ad-

A LL JUNIORS
MUST BE SHOT
FOR APPEARANCE
IN THE
1983 MICHIGAN ENSIANI
All Juniors and grad. students at U-M have been summoned to appear in
their college yearbook, the '83 Ensian. If you will graduate during the next
year, you are sentenced to sit before the Delma professional photographer
for 6 painless minutes. SITTINGS BEGIN MARCH 29. FOR APPOINTMENTS,
CALL 764-9425 or stop by the NCN office at 420 Maynard NOW.

mimnistrator for student affairs. Ex-
cept for completing information for
their Student Verification Forms,
Medical School students have almost no
work to do on their own for registration.
LAW STUDENTS also have a dif-
ferent registration procedure, accor-
ding to Law School Recorder Chris
Monroe. Law students fill out election
worksheets for their seminars and
clinics before requesting other courses.
Those forms are sent to Karunas'' office
for processing. The course lists are then
returned to the Law School, Monroe
said.
But Monroe added that students are
dropped randomly from courses that
are too full. Students dropped from
courses must pick other courses during
a special registration period.
Art School students are able to
register early solely for art courses by
taking part in "an archaic gymnasium
registration," according to Ann
Savage, the director of student services
for the Art School.,
In the gymnasium registration,
students must obtain a card that reser-
ves their place in any particular cour-
se; the system is similar to the way in
which all University students
registered before the introduction of
CRISP.
Most of the other schools and colleges
in the University have students register
the same way LSA students do,
although some, like the School of Social
Work, do not require that students go to
Lorch Hall in person.
Tuesday's article will examine the
scheduling office and Checkpoint.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
GM workers to vote on pact
DETROIT- By the end of the coming week, the United Auto Workers
likely will have new contracts with the Big Two automakers which may
delay but not in the final analysis stop the decline of the American auto in-
dustry.
More than 300,000 workers at General Motors Corp. are voting this week on
a concessionary agreement which mirrors the pact reached in February at
Ford Motor Co. Union leaders predict the GM workers will join their Ford
colleagues and approve the pact on a comfortable margin.
Despite all the concessions by the unions however, despite all the promises
by the companies, the contracts do nothing to directly solve the basic
problem facing the industry-slumping sales.
Justice Dept. defends
civil rights policies
WASHINGTQN- The Justice Department, stung by criticism of its civil
rights policies, yesterday issued a point-by-point defense of its enforcement
activities in battling discrimination.
The 55-page report took issue with a study by the Leadership Conference
on Civil Rights, which charged the Reagan Justice Department had failed to
enforce the law of the land and was swayed by political influence.
Reagan works on vacation
WASHINGTON- President Reagan is flying to Jamaica and Barbados
this week for a working vacation.
"To say he is going down to deliver an Easter basket full of goodies would
be misleading," an official said, "but he is demonstrating a commitment to
Jamaica, which has a tradition of democracy."
In what the officials say is the first presidential visit to the two islands,
Reagan will fly to Jamaica on Wednesday, meet with Prime Minister Ed-
ward Seaga and then attend a state dinner.
On Thursday, he will go to Barbados for meetings with Eastern Caribbean
leaders and two days of rest with his wife, Nancy.
Welfare director dead at 57
LANSING- Welfare Director John Dempsey, a durable and influential
figure in state government, died of lung cancer Friday. He was 57.
Dempsey joined the Milliken administration in 1969, as the governor's
special assistant for urban affairs. He has served as chief of the budget in
Milliken's executive office and state Budget Director, but is best known for
his operation of the social services department, beginning in 1975.
Dempsey weathered a number of controversies which rocked the troubled
agency, including allegations of abuse and neglect in foster care homes,
charges of indifference to widespread chiseling and complaints from
recipients over administrative changes.
Dempsey, a native of Detroit who held a Ph.D. in political science from the
University of Michigan, is survived by his wife and three sons.
Soviets' diet reflects
country's poor agriculture
WASHINGTON- Dieticians are telling Soviet- citizens to eat more
potatoes and sugar and less meat, dairy products and fruit in what U.S. ex-
perts say is a reflection of the country's inability'to produce enough high-
quality foods.
"It's back to potatoes and other high-calorie foodstuffs for Soviet citizens
in the coming years . . .," according to an analysis by Yuri Markish, an
economist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
"The recentsizeable reductions in the norms for -meat vegetables and
fruit-to a level lower than any published in the 1970s-and the compen-
satory increases in potatoes contrast sharply with past trends," he said.
U.S. agriculture economists specdlate that one reason for the recent
changes in dietary norms published by Moscow is the realization by Soviet
experts that the food production targets in the latest Five-Year Plan are too
ambitious.

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hiw 1Mid-gzrn 1autt
Vol. XCII, No. 146
Sunday, April 4, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
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6

Editor-in-Chief....................DAVID MEYER
Managing Editor ...............P.PAMELA KRAMER
Executive Editor.............. CHARLES THOMSON
Student Affairs Editor.......ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor .................... MARK GINDIN
Opinion Page Editors.........ANDREW CHAPMAN
JULIE HINDS
Arts Editors..................RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
Sports Editor .. .... BOB WOJNOWSKI
Associate Sports Editors . BARB BARKER
MARTHA CRALL
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK
Photography Editor ................. BRIAN MASCK
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill. Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Jeff Schrier.
ASSISTANT PHOTOGRAPHERS: Linda Kelley, Doug
McMahon,.Avi Pelosoff. Elizabeth Scott, Jon Snow.
Diane Williams.
ARTISTS: Norm Christiansen Robert Lence. Jonathan
Stewart. Richard Wolk.
LIBRARIANS: Bonnie Hawkins, Gary Schmitz.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, George Adams, Jason
Adkins. Beth Allen, Perry Clark, Poe Coughlan, Lisa
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Jenny Miller. Amy Moon, Anne Mytych, Dan
Oberrotman, Stacy Powell, Janet Roe, Chris Solata,
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Sparks. Lisa Spector. Bill Spindle, Krisin Stapleton,
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,I
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ARTS STAFF: Tonic Blonich, Jane Carl, James Clinton,
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