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April 02, 1982 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-02

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t

ARTS

4

The Michigan Daily

Friday, April 2, 1982

Page6:

N. .

V"

'Portraits'
mixes
music with
pantomime

4

By Walt Owen

- \
.lirector Jean-Jacques Annaud explains the next scene to an actor portraying early man, in the movie, 'Quest for Fire.'
Annaudsdea n fim

.y Richard Camp bell fantasy adventure detailing the
___ R___rdCapbe__ struggle for man's survival 80,000years
ago. As Annaud conceived the film,
IRECTOR Jean-Jacques Annaud based in part on a book, the story con-
D has a very pragmatic view of his centrates on the "emergence of
craft. "My job is to make a dream come man ... the emergence of emotion."
true. But a dream is a dream; and you Nameer El-Kadi, an actor who por-
can never get it right." trays a member of the Ulam tribe, said
The analogy of a dream is very apt, of Annaud, "He is a special kind of
fqr his latest film, Quest for Fire, is a director. You would read the scene and
then he would let us go." That kind of
ann give and take attitude forms the basis
on his directing style. "If the essential
(to a scene) is there, then you're a good
director. A good director copes with
;DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR reality. The essential is coping with
reality.
ROOMS STILL AVAILABLE "It is more important to respect the
FOR GRADUATION guts of the picture than a specific
element. If you can find an equivalent
" 200 Rooms situation, you can have it as well."
&e Cooms Of 'tourse some elements of the film
" Color T.V.'s could not be changed. The makeup that
S, Cocktail Lounge the actors wear, consisting of
u Direct Dial Phones prosthetic pieces about one quarter in-
* Near U of M ch thick, took over two hours to apply.
" Group Rates Available El-Kadi said that Annaud told him,
"It was going to be a very difficult
* Major Credit Cards Honored shoot." But Everett McGill, another
" Call for Reservations member of the Ulams, added, "Not
"-10 * ;Fourth Av. e . '799J00 evey day do you find aharacter that
y.requires that much transformuation It's-
a special role that doesn't come around
r mrr vgn.very often."

For all its assumed realism, the film
has come under attack for portraying
the development of emotions as an
event that might have taken place in
the not so distant past. Annaud
remarked, "The mistake is not that it
comes at the end (of the movie), but
that it was a discovery of the men of
that time. It was probably developed by
that time, but I used it symbolically to
tell a story."
One of the cinematic devices used to
tell that story was the film's music.
Phillippe Sarde's score covers the en-
tire spectrum of rhythm and tone. "I
had a very restricted choice. I found
that Prokofiev, Stravinsky, and Pen-
derrecki worked well and also
Japanese percussion music," Annaud
said. Phillippe Sarde's resulting score,
based on Annaud's comments, covers
all tones, from non-melodic, barbaric
wind instruments, to very sentimental,
strictly melodic flute and string music.

THOSE AMONG us who regularly
complain of the "same old thing"
will have no excuse come Saturday
night. For the cost of a first-run movie
($3.50) the University Mime Troupe will
present the one-night debut performan-
ce of "Portraits of Artists" at the
Michigan Theatre. Director Perry
Perrault and producer Thomas Drotar
have prepared a four sequence pan-
tomime play with an inventive mixture
of dance, drama, mime, and music.
Kids and adults alike (your choice)
may enjoy the storyline of four dif-
ferent artists: "The Sculptor," "The
Dancer," "The Writer," and "The
Starving Musician." The human and
emotional struggles of an artistic life
will be on view in this unique presen-
tation. Attention to the stage is the only
key to entertainment.
Producer Drotar also wrote "Por-
traits of Artists," and hopes for :an
open-minded audience. "People
are not going to come and see only the
pure white-face used by mime masters
like Marcel Marceau," say Drotar.
"We used that pre illusionary technique
last year." Though trained in
illusionary mime, the performers are
also trained in the diverse technique
used in Saturday's show.
Drotar and director Perrault, whose
European mime background was an
encouragement to the rest of the
troupe, each perform two major
character roles in "Portraits of Ar-
tists."

t

6

Gemini performs tonight a
Clubs/Bars
The Ark (1421 Hill Street; 761-1451)
Gemini, twin brothers who play a
variety of instruments including
guitars, mandolin, violin, pen-
nywhistle, and bones, perform
tonight and tomorrow. They per-
form their own songs as well as folk
music from the British Isles, Israel,
and hungary.

nd tomorrow at the Ark
reggae's premier groups along
the Mighty Diamonds, perfor
Hill Auditorium on Saturdayi
Influenced by the great Ame
soul singers, Toots Hibber
delved in Jamaican rhythm
blues, ska, soul, bluebeat
reggae. Opening for Toots wi
Human Switchboard from Ohi
2071 for more information.

Dance

University
Department

of Michigan

The end, to this influx of ideas is the
only prehistoric caveman movie worth The gathering of talent for
seeing twice. And although some of the "Portraits of Artists" hints at this
plotting might be simple-minded, "a novel blend. The company of mime per-
standard plot" ir jkE ~t-1di, the formers are all rembers of the Univer-
discipline ihdqjiality W tlt Which the sity community with tested theater ex-
movie was carried out are extremely perienee; the Ann Arbor Chamber Or-
admirable. chestra will perform the original music
of masters student Paul Hodgins during
two of the pieces; six University dan-
cers will highlight "The Dancer;" and
SUthe U-M Theatre Department supplied
the entire production with an extensive
lighting arrangement designed to
gan Gilbert and Sullivan enhance the visual experience.

The Blind Pig (208 S. First; 996-
8555)
Delta blues with John Mooney.
Joe's Star Lounge (109 N. Main;
665-JOES)
Friday and Saturday Sailcruz is
featured. Monday and Tuesday, the
Madcat/Brubeck band return.
Rick's American Cafe (611 Church;
996-2747)
Hot, danceable rhythm and blues
with the Urbations. Tonight and
tomorrow.
Second Chance (516 E. Liberty; 994-
5350)
Moriah (some kind of disease?) per-
forms top 40 rock through Sunday.
University Club (Michigan Union,-
530 S. State; 763-5911)
For a change of pace the U-Club has
rock 'n' roll with.Bounty Hunter.
Concerts
Michigan Community Theatre Foun-
dation
The Mclain family, Kentucky's
premier blue grass musicians, per-
form Sunday at the Michigan
Theatre. Coming from Eastern Ken-
tuck'y Appalachian Mountains, the
Mclain Family Band is known and
appreciated internationally as one of
the most spontaneous, spirited, and
exciting groups performing
traditional bluegrass music. Their
repertoire includes familar
favorites and original material. 668-
8480 for more information.

"Free the Virtual Nine," a
concert featuring the wor
University Graduate student
be presented in Studio A Thea
the Dance building. 763-546
more information.
Canterbury Loft
Former Mirage Dance Coll
member Joan Derry pre
"Choreography, Improvisation
Tap," with vocal accompanimi
Julie Fink and Betsy Cook. Als
tist Joan Weiss, abstract pair
and drawings will be featured
lobby. 665-0606 for more
mation.
Theater
UAC Musket
Musket is presenting another
aimed-to-sell-out productions,
Christ Superstar, the wild
irreverent '70s musical. For
information, call 763-1107.
Department of Theatre and Dr
Getting Out, Marsha Nor
award winning drama about ti
pact of prison life on a young w
trying to cope with the day-t
pressures on living on the outs
its last week at the True
Theatre. This is one of the c
tment's best productions this
764-0450 for more information.

.
-I
g with
ms at
night.
erican q
t has
nand
tand
ill. be ,p
o.763-
KO
Dace
dance
ks of
s will
tre of
0 -for
ective
sents.U
n, and
ent by
o, ar- _
ntings
in the
infor-
f
4y.0
of its
Jesus
3 and
more
ama
man's
he im-
oman
to-day
ide in
~blooda
depar-
year. f
Mime
rrault
tists" }
urday
r. For
article
nd/or
Ay
y

A
-=-loll 4

DIRECTOR
The University of Michic

Society seeks a dramatics director, music director,
scenic designer, and costume designer for its fall
1982 production. Shows under consideration are
Gondoliers, Princess Ida, and Sorcerer.
CANDIDATES SHOULD CALL 761-4622 AFTER 5:00 P.M.
Messages can be left at 761-7855 any time of day or night.

This combination of local talents is
bound to result in some of the more in-
teresting entertainment this weekend.
Whether or not you enjoy mime,
whether or not you ever seen a mime
show, "Portraits of Artists" is going to
offer a fresh expression of creativity.

i

Miscellaneous

D EiiK

University of MichiganP
Troupe
Tom Drotar and Perry Pe
have created "Portraits of Ar
and it will be performed Sat
night at the Michigan Theater
more information see the a
somewhere else on this page a
call 668-8480.

Major Events
Toots and the Maytals,

one of

I

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1 !

ANN ARBOR LATE SHOWS
FRI and SAT NIGHT!I
AT MIDNIGHT (X)
ALL SEATS $3.00
UNEDITED

Right now, Republic is offering two tickets
for the price of one on a spring ski trip. To
some of the best skiing of the year.
Spring skiing! Lift tickets and accommo-
dations are reduced up to 60% at some

and a round trip ticket (Y or Y63 fare) to
Denver, Salt Lake City, Boise, Reno, Twin
Falls/Sun Valley, Idaho Falls or Kalispell.
They must fly together with at least two
nights between outgoing and return

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
FEA TURING
BOUNTY HUNTER
$2.00 Cover Charge-8:30 P.M.
DRINK SPECIALS

iii

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