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April 01, 1982 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DESIRE PAYS OFF FOR HARDY

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, April 1, 1982-Page 9

Ex-M
By PAUL HELGREN
Just two years ago it seemed that1
Alan Hardy didn't have a chance to
make it as a professional basketball
player. Admittedly, the former

eager proves the sk

Michigan forward's road to the NBA
has hardly been conventional. But he
has made it as a reserve for the Detroit
Pistons nonetheless.
Never a star in college, the 6-7 Hardy

was not chosen in the NBA draft after
his senior year with the Wolverines in
1979. And in a league where even third
and fourth round draft picks have
trouble landing a spot on a team, Har-
dy's chances to make the pros were
slim, to say the least. But he had two
things working in his favor-confidence
in his own ability and a desire for a
"real chance" to play and prove him-
self.
"I DIDN'T want to give up," the
Detroit native said. "I wanted to give
myself a real chance ... a fair chance."

signed with the semi-pro Alberta
Dusters of the Continental Basketball
Association before being signed by the
Pistons in November.
Whereas Hardy did not join the
Pistons amidst a great deal of fanfare,
he did come to Michigan from Detroit
Northwestern high school in 1975,
touted by former basketball coach
Johnny Orr as "one of the best forward
prospects in the nation." Hardy
averaged 22 points a game and earned
MVP honors while leading North-
western to the city championship. He
was also selected to most All-State
teams that year.
Despite his impressive background,
Hardy saw little playing time in his first
two years at Michigan. As a freshman,
though, Hardy got to play in the last
minute of the NCAA championship
game in Philadelphia, something he
calls his "greatest thrill in basketball,
without a doubt." Michigan lost that
game to Indiana, 86-68.
AS A JUNIOR, Hardy started all 27
games at forward for the Wolverines,
scoring 11.8 points and grabbing 6.3
rebounds per game. But as a senior he
didn't break into the starting lineup un-
til mid-season and his overall playing
time was reduced. During his four
seasons at Michigan, Hardy said he
wasn't given a real chance to prove his
ability. "Johnny Orr never gave me a
fair chance," he said. "I thought I
deserved a chance to really prove
myself." Hardy did manage to score
over 10 points a game as a senior, but it
wasn't enough to get him picked in the
NBA draft.
The fact that he made the pros
without being drafted or being a college
star gives Hardy a great deal of
satisfaction. "Making the pros," said
Hardy, "makes me feel I was right
(about his ability) all along."
Although he is only averaging eight
minutes of playing time per game this
year, Hardy is pleased with his con-
tribution to the Pistons' battle for a

eptics
playoff berth. "I've helped in whatever
way I could in the little time I've had (to
play)," he commented. He is currently
averaging 3.7 points and slightly under
one rebound per game. He has been in
double figures in scoring three times,
with 13 points being his personal high.
HARDY, WHO is unmarried, owns a
house in Detroit and plans to per-
manently reside there. He is not sure
what his future role with the Pist6ns
will be, but said he will talk to the club
about it at the end of the season.
He enjoys most of the aspects of NBA

wrong
life, even traveling, which many
players don't like. "The hardest part
about the NBA," he said, "is the
realization that it's a business. There's
a lot more to it than just the game.
Players can get treated unfairly."
During the off-season Hardy spends
his time improving his game in NBA
summer leagues or working with kids
in basketball camps.
When his basketball career is over,
Hardy, who has a degree in com-
munications, would like to begin a new
career in broadcasting.

'"STOTO.Ti-10 -. - -

Hardy tried out with the Pistons
before and after the 1979 season, but
was cut both times. He played no
basketball that winter, but went west in
the summer to play for the Adidas Pros
in the California Summer Basketball
League. It was there that Hardy turned
his career around. He led the league in
scoring (33.5) and finished second in
rebounding (10.8), while shooting 55
percent from the field.
These statistics did not go unnoticed,
as the then world champion Los
Angeles Lakers were impressed enough
to sign Hardy. Hardy commented on
the ordeal of NBA tryouts, "You can get
a bad deal in a lot of tryout camps. I
wanted to make sure I got a good chan-
ce in a camp."
HARDY WAS used sparingly by the
Lakers, playing in only 22 games and
averaging a little over two points a
game. He was cut by L.A. shortly
before the start of this season and had

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I

Sports Information Photo
SHOWN HERE in a game against Alabama, former Wolverine forwaiu,
Alan Hardy (42), displays the talent that led him to the NBA. After a brief
stint with the Los Angeles Lakers, Hardy landed a job as a reserve for the
Detroit Pistons.

Former 'M' hurler Adams named

eassistant coach at Ben

Special to the Daily
WALTHAM, Mass.-Former University
of Michigan baseball star Arthur "Ace"
Adams has been named assistant
baseball coach at Bentley College in
Massachusetts.
Adams, who served as a Bentley
assistant for three years before leaving
to become head coach at Framingham
,tate College last year. The 29-year-old
rmer pitcher earned All-Big Ten
honors at Michigan before playing
professionally in the Pittsburgh
Pirates' organization.
Phillies 8, Tigers 1
CLEARWATER, Fla. (AP) - Larry
Christenson held the Detroit Tigers to
two hits and struck out eight in six in-
nings yesterday as the Philadelphia
Phillies powered their way to an 8-1
exhibition victory.
Christenson also contributed to the
Phillies' offense, singling in the first
Phillies run and stealing second base in

his first at-bat.
IN HIS LAST two starts, Christenson
has given up just five hits, one run and
one walk while striking out 15 in 12 in-
nings.
Bo Diaz doubled in three
Philadelphia runs in the sixth inning
and Pete Rose added two singles and a
walk in four trips to the plate.
Detroit's Milt Wilcox walked five and
gave up 11 hits in six innings. The
Tigers' sole run came on rookie Howard
Johnson's fourth-inning homer.
The Phillies are now 11-10 in spring
training play, while Detroit is 8-15.
Oliver traded to Expos
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) -
Al Oliver, one of the premier left-
handed batters in the American League
was dealt by the Texas Rangers to the
Montreal Expos fo the National League
yesterday for third baseman Larry
Parrish and first baseman Dave
Hostetler.
The teams jointly announced the trade
moments before they were to meet in
an exhibition game.-
"We've have working to get Oliver
for 10 years," said Expos' General
Manager John McHale of the 35-year-old
player. "It looks like a deal made in
heaven because both clubs are going to
be helped.
"I KNOW IT gives us good balance
from the left side of the plate."
Oliver has batted over .300 for the last
five seasons, including a .309 mark in
421 at bats in 1981.
The 28-year-old Parrish, the Expos'
regular third baseman since 1975, has a
.269 career average. After batting .307
in 1979, his best season, Parrish slum-
ped to .254 and .244 in 1980 and 1981
respectively.
Hostetler, 26, is a power-hitting first
baseman who had 27 home runs and 103
RBIs in 1981 with the Denver Bears,
Montreal's Class AAA affiliate.

ley College
belted aAhree-run home run and a run-
scoring single and Randy Johnson
homered to power the Atlanta Braves to
a 7-3 exhibition baseball win over
the Houston Astros yesterday.
The Astros took a 1-0 lead in the
second inning as Alan Ashby scored on
a single by Terry Puhl.
But Horner's home runin the fourth
inning put the Braves ahead to stay.
Orioles 4, White Sox 3
SARASOTA, Fla. , (AP)- Gary
Roenicke's ninth-inning home run gave
the Baltimore Orioles a 4-3 exhibition
baseball victory yesterday over the
Chicago White Sox.
The third Baltimore homer of the
game came with two outs against loser
Lamarr Hoyt.
EARLIER Bob Bonner had homered
off Dennis Lamp in the third inning and
Ken Singleton had hit one in the sixth
against Reggie Patterson. Singleton
also had a run-scoring double off Lamp
in the first inning.
The White Sox, trailing 3-1, tied the
game in the seventh against Tim Stod-
dard, who had to leave the game with
an apparent arm injury.
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1

NEIL

Ouer
...traded to Expos

Braves 7, Astros 3
COCOA, Fla. (AP)- Bob Horner

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