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March 26, 1982 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-26

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0

F FALL HOUSING
I in
RESIDENCE HALLS
(Baits, Oxford, Cambridge and Fletcher only)
Applications will be available to all students
(including those who lost in the drawing)
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31, 1982
THE HOUSING INFORMATION OFFICE
1011 STUDENT ACIVIIES 6UILDING
A drawing will be used toM
establish priority for assignment
Apply anytime between
8:00 AM and 4:00 PM
March 31, 1982
k Do NOT Line Up Early!
Do NOT Camp Overnight!

Page 10-Friday, March 26, 1982-The Michigan Daily
HEDLUND RIDING INTO NCAAS
M gymnas always in the saddle

By JESSE BARKIN
"If you do one thing, and one thing
only, you can be the best."
-Andrea Jeager,
Kentucky Fried Chicken eater
Michigan's Nevin Hedlund sub-
scribes to the above theory. The junior
gymnast is a "specialist." His exper-
tise is on the pommel horse, the only
event that Hedlund competes in. Con-
sequently, in accordance with Jaeger's
theory, he has becomeone of the best.
Hedlund will be one of five Michigan
gymnasts who will compete at the
NCAA championships, next weekend in

Action Sports V~ar
F ACTORY
CLOSEOUTS

Nebraska, as he qualified on the horse
on the basis of his 9.43 average.
"HE IS ONE of the leading stylists
(in the Big Ten) on the pommel horse,"
said Wolverine coach Newt Loken,
"and his selection for NCAA com-
petition verifies this."
Making nationals was a big accom-
plishment for Hedlund. "I've always
wanted to go. It's been a goal of mine
since I've been in college," he said.
Hedlund's goal at the meet is to finish
in the top 15, but he acknowledged that
the competition will be very tough.
About 65 competitors will be vying for
the pommel horse crown, including last
year's co-champions Mike Bergman'
from California and Steve Jennings of
New Mexico. Tough competition will
also come from his* own region as
Hedlund said Tim Olsen and Doug
Keiso, both from Northern Illinois, are
very strong.
BUT DESPITE the high-caliber
competition, Hedlund said that he will
feel less press#-re than if it were a dual
meet in the middle of the season.
"It (the NCAA championship) won't
be as much pressure because it won't
be a team meet," he said, explaining
that he feels more pressure when his
score is critical to the team's score. If
he was ever nervous, though, it would
be hard to prove since it was his high
level of consistent excellence on the
horse that earned him his NCAA bid. In
.fact, four out of his five qualifying
scores were 9.45, which is his career
best.
In addition to his expertise on the hor-
se, Hedlund carries a high level of ex-
cellence in his schoolwork. As a major
in the school of Architecture and Urban
Planning, Hedlund has a 3.40 gpa.
"HE REALLY represents the model

of what we coaches like at Michigan
and that is being an outstanding
student-athlete," said Loken. "And in
spite of a very arduous academic
schedule of late afternoon labs, he has
always structured a good daily workout
even though it may go into the
evenings."
Because of his schedule, Hedlund has
been working out each weekday after-
noon from 4:30-6:30 at the IM Building.
"It'sworking out O.K. Since I only work
one event I don't have to work as much
as the other guys who do all-around,
he said.
But those "other guys" don't worry
about the number of hours he puts in,
they just care about what he gets out of
them and gives back to the team. And

because of their respect for him, they
voted Hedlund team captain-gnly the
third time in the team's history that a
junior has been elected. Loken
acknowledged that he has been a "fine
captain of our team."
As for Hedlund's career-related
goals, after he graduates architecture
is in and gymnastics is out. "I enjoy the
sport a lot but there's nothing left to do
after college," he explained. Hedlund
said that he would like to get a job as an
architect when he graduates next year,
and later come back for grad school.
Eventually, he said, he wants to own his
own architecture firm.
But for now he'll just have to worry
about designing a winning performance
in Nebraska.

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Doily Photo by BRIAN MAST
JUNIOR NEVIN HEDLUND, shown here working out on the pommel horse,
does not-attempt to participate in any other gymnastics events. Instead, he
has devoted all his efforts towards the horse. His work has earned him the
honor of being elected team captain by his teammates.

Michigan basebal has___

0

Major League.

By RANDY BERGER
The quality of a college baseball
program is often judged by its
record, its level of competition, and
the number of players it sends to the
pros. While it is obvious that the
Michigan baseball program meets
the first two requirements, people
tend to overlook the fact that
Michigan is one of the biggest
training grounds for professional
baseball players. Lary Sorenson of
the Cleveland Indians, Steve Howe
of the Los Angeles Dodgers, and
Rick Leach of the Detroit Tigers
head the list of Michigan alumni
presently in the pro ranks.
How can Michigan, a school
located in the northern part of the
country, turn out such talented
players? Coaches, players, and
scouts all agree that one of
Michigan's strengths lies in
recruiting.
"THEY DO just a good job
recruiting," said Toronto Blue Jay
scout Don Welke, who was respon-
sible for drafting Scott Elam and
Gerry Hool from last year's
Wolverine team. "They get players
with talent and further develop
them. Sometimes by the player's
junior year he has progressed well
enough to be able to play in the
pros."
Because of Michigan's ability to
recruit top-rated players, scouts an-,
nually put Ann Arbor on their list of
campuses to visit in the spring. "As
long as they continue recruiting well
I'll be back there every year," said
Dodger scout Dale McRenolds.
The main reason coaches and

players feel Michigan is able to lure
talent away from southern schools
and the minor leagues is its
academic standing.
"THERE'S NO other school I
think that combines athletics with
academics, as well as Michigan,"
said- Sorenson, who donned a
Michigan uniform from 1973-76.
"I think college baseball has got-
ten better overall mainly because
more high school players are in-
terested in getting degrees," added
Middaugh. "More people are
coming to Michigan because of
academics and the great athletic
tradition."
Once the player decides to attend
Michigan his chances of making the
pros don't seem to be inhibited by
the fact that the Wolverine's
schedule is shorter and the Michigan
climate worse than at southern
schools.
"THE IDEA that all the good
players play in the south is a myth,"

appeal
said fornier coach Moby Benedict.
"Southern players may mature
faster but Midwestern players are
just as good. They just take a little
-longer to develop."
By looking at the number of
Michigan players drafted in the
past, it is apparent that the Major.
League teams are willing to wait. In
fact, in 1976 Michigan had three
players-Howe, Leach and Steve
Perry-drafted in the first round-a
feat unprecedented in college
baseball.
"In my area it is the premier
college," added McRenolds. "They
seem to have the money, resources,
and a great schedule. I don't mind to
see players go to Michigan at all."
BESIDES'. being able to recruit
quality players, the baseball
program is also praised for
developing players into pro prospec-
t*. The complimentary remarks not
only are generated from pro,coaches
and , scouts but from former
Michigan players.
"The main thing that I think he
(former Michigan coach) Moby
Benedict) was excellent in teaching,
was fundamentals," said current
Detroit Tiger Rick Leach. "We
worked everyday on them and I
think that's what separated us from
other teams."
' "Going to Michigan gave me a
chance to make it in a good
program," added Sorenson.
"Everything is organized and goal-
oriented."
You can be sure that one of those
goals is turning out professional
baseball players.

I

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Sorenson
...former M' hurler

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Great Gre&rky hits'
200-point mark

CALGARY, Alberta (AP) - Edmon-
ton Oilers center Wayne Gretzky
became the first player in National
Hockey League history to get 200 points
in a season last nightwhen he assisted
on a goal in the first period of al game
against Calgary. The 21-year-old super
star reached the 200-point mark by
assisting on a goal by Pat Hughes.
Gretsky won a face-off in Calgary's
zone and pushed the puck into a corner
where he dug it out against Flames
rookie defenseman Steve Konroyd.
Astros 10, Tigers 3
COCOA, Fla. (AP) - Jose Cruz and
Phil Garner combined for five hits and
five runs batted in yesterday as the

Astros beat the Detroit Tigers, 10-3, in
an exhibition baseball game.i
The Astros broke a scoreless game in
the fourth when Cruz singled home
Craig Reynolds, who had singled and
advanced to third on an error.
The Astros tapped Detroit starter
Jack Morris for four runs and five hits
in the sixth. Tony.Scott led off with a.
single, Cruz tripled to make it 2-0, and
Garner singled home Cruz before adan-
cing to second on an infield out. Art
Howe, who also had two hits, singled
home Garner, and Alan Ashby's triple
brought home Howe to make it 5-0.
The Tigers scored all three runs in
the seventh off Astros starter Vern
Ruhle, who pitched seven innings in the
longest outing for any Astros pitcher
this spring.

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